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tiny breaks in picture burnt to DVD

Discussion in 'Nero discussion' started by andker333, Mar 29, 2007.

  1. andker333

    andker333 Guest

    I am wondering whehther it is the small picture on the burn page (a kind of 'view' window) that shows the frames every 0.5 second or less - the window seems to view frames at about the same rate as the burnt DVD halts the DVD picture momentarily.

    Could anyone help? Hoe do I turn off the view window? Is my problem due to this window when burning? Or something else?

    Thanks
    Andrew
     
  2. club42

    club42 Regular member

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    Hey andker333 welcome to AD. You need to be a little more descriptive about what you are trying to do.
     
  3. andker333

    andker333 Guest

    Hi Thanks for the welcome Club42. I'll be as specific as I can - I am using Nero VisionExpress. I go through all the hoops to create a DVD from a movie file I have on hard disk. Then I come to the screen that says in the bottom right 'Burn'. When I push the button all the right things happen - the 2 green lines appear and the time taken/left is on screen. At the top right hand corner there is a box- like a TV - that shows frame by frame as (I presume) it is written to disk.
    I think that these frames corespond to breaks I am getting when I watch the DVD once completed. The picture seems to momentrily halt for a fraction of a second every few seconds!
    My query is - is it the little TV causing the problem, cause I know when you download films you should not have thumbnail on in Explorer as there might be conflict (or something like that) - so is this the same? If it is, can I close the little television when I am recording? Or if it is not related to the little TV when recording, do you have any idea what might cause these breaks?
    I have viewed the film from my hard file and it is not doing the fraction of a second halt thing, so it must be in the recording of the DVD.
    Thanks in anticipation.
    Andrew
     
  4. gwendolin

    gwendolin Senior member

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    The preview that you can see is no reflection on your final outcome, what brand of discs are you using and what is your burn speed.
     
  5. andker333

    andker333 Guest

    BENQ 16X - could it be the discs?
     
  6. gwendolin

    gwendolin Senior member

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    I would NOT recommend burning at 16X...no matter how good the discs are, I always recommend burning at 4X.
     
  7. andker333

    andker333 Guest

    Thanks for the advice, i'll take it, but could you explain a little about why the slower speed?

    Andrew
     
  8. fasfrank

    fasfrank Active member

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    We have found out over many hundreds of posts that a slower burn speed eliminates many picture/playback quality problems. When someone is posting with these type problems, the very first step is to suggest a slower burn speed. That eliminates the problem in most cases. If the problem persists, we can go on from there.

    A bit about the burn process:

    All recordable DVD media types feature a microscopic wobbled groove embedded in the plastic substrate, covered by a layer of heat-sensitive organic dye. This wobble provides the recorder with the timing information needed to place data accurately on the disc. A virtual pit is recorded by heating a tiny pinpoint of dye with a tightly focused laser. This permanently changes the dye's physical characteristics at that point, giving it optical properties similar to those of a stamped pit.

    [​IMG]

    This is occuring many thousands of times per second. A slower burn speed reduces the amount of laser power needed as well as the frequency of the laser pulse. While all of this is occuring, a "running optimum power check" is performed which allows laser power as well as disc rotation speed to be adjusted.
     
  9. andker333

    andker333 Guest

    Thanks that's very helpful. Kind of you to take the trouble. Regards Andrew
     

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