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Transfering VHS to DVD

Discussion in 'Video to DVD' started by mle56, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. mle56

    mle56 Member

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    For those of you more experienced users, let me pick your brain. I would like to convert some VHS tapes to DVD's and transfer some digital video tape to DVD. I have some basic programs like Nero, Ulead Studio 9, Pinnacle Quick Start and Windows Movie Maker. I run Windows XP but my system is a Celeron with 667Mhz. Is this too slow to work with video? Do those table top combination VCR/DVD burners work well for putting VCR tapes and DV directly onto a DVD? Please share your expertise with me as I know many of you in the forum are very knowledgable. Thank you for your patience with us newbies.

    mle56
     
  2. robguy

    robguy Member

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    DVD burner/VCR combos won't let you record copy-protected VHS tapes. Otherwise, you shouldn't have a problem. As for DV-handling, it will depend on the model you buy. Also, be sure you use rewritable DVDs to record on the combo -- it'll save you some pesos. If you're going to buy such a unit, shop around, study the specs, ask questions.

    Your Celeron system should be able to handle the video OK, but it'll strain under the load; and it'll take awhile to process video. Probably QUITE a while. As Martha Stewart would say, "A faster computer is a good thing."

    Another thing that will affect how your system handles videos will be the amount of memory you have, and your operating system. It's always best to use a newer version of Windows rather than the much-maligned Windows 98, a.k.a. crash-o-rama. And Windows ME is a joke from Bill Gates to the computer world, and a way to make a quick buck from an unsuspecting public.

    You'll also need a program (Nerovision is good) to convert the DVD videos you've recorded on the combo to MPEG-2 so you can edit them/add menus, add chapters, etc. and burn back to a blank DVD on your PC when your project is done.

    You must determine if your hard drive is capable of storing video. If your hard drive is too small, processing video won't be possible. It can take up to 10GB to STORE and PROCESS a single dvd and to burn it. Does your hard drive measure up?

    Finally, you need a good DVD burner on your PC if you don't already have one (you didn't mention it in your post).

    If buying a newer, faster computer with more memory and hard drive space is an option for you, exercise the option.
     
  3. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

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    Agreed. A faster computer (CPU Power) is a necessity when doing video.
    Pinnacle Studio 9 will do your captures, with the right hardware.
    If you have a LOT of VHS, then something like the Canopus ADVC-100 would be a good investment, and would capture on your current system.
    If you can't justify spending that much on a good TBC, then a $25 capture card will work, but you'll need to spend a bunch of money on a computer that can run it.
     
  4. Doc409

    Doc409 Active member

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    The Canopus ADVC-100, or the ADVC-50 card is most likely the best approach for a VHS of any length. The Canopus is the only product I know of that has a codec that locks the video with the audio. I have tried a couple of other methods, and neither was reliable when it came to synch problems.

    Your PC is on the slow side for this project, but I think you could get by if your have at least 512 MB of RAM.
     
  5. Videopro1

    Videopro1 Guest

    For a little more money the Canopus ADVC-300 does a great job cleaning up & stabilizing old vhs video
     
  6. Doc409

    Doc409 Active member

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    About $300 more!!! :)

    Have you used both? I'm wondering what the 300 can clean up or stabilize?
     
  7. Videopro1

    Videopro1 Guest

    The ADVC300 has digital noise reduction and image stabilization using Line Time Base Correction (LTBC), ADVC300 instantly cleans, stabilizes and preserves old VHS video. I've used both & have been very impressed with the results of the ADVC300. The colors of captured video are much more vivid also. It comes with Picture control 300 software also but from my experiences, the boxes' default settings give the best results.
     
  8. Doc409

    Doc409 Active member

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    Does "noise" refer to only visual items like white specs and other video distortions, or does it also include actual audio noise like the tell-tale background hum?

    I am also wondering if the 300 lets you increase the audio gain for difficult-to-hear recordings?
     
  9. Videopro1

    Videopro1 Guest

    In the picture control software there are level settings for volume, high, low and AGC
     
  10. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

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    Do all these settings apply to the recording portion (prefiltering), or just the playback onscreen?
     
  11. Videopro1

    Videopro1 Guest

    It applies to the recording or prefiltering. It's best to adjust the settings by having one of the outputs of the advc300 going to a regular tv monitor since it is hard to adjust settings by looking at it on a computer monitor.
     
  12. Doc409

    Doc409 Active member

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    Thanks for the info on the 300. Quality is a major issue with some upcoming projects I have, so I'm going to try to find some room in my budget for this purchase.

    Concerning ways to increase the Gain, is there any user-friendly software that will let you do this with an AVI or MPEG-2 file?
     
  13. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

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    Any audio program, even Audacity (free) will do lots with audio files. Goldwave has even more options.
     
  14. flabob

    flabob Regular member

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    hi Ya'll...iv'e been rrading this thread,and it is interesting.....you guys sound like you know your stuff :O)....cna you look at my question i posted to other sites, but havent gotten anything back that makes sense..here is my question...thx for any help..should i still get the AD-100?

    am looking to know exactly what i need to convert vhs to dvd.(especially copy righted holly wood vsh).....i have 2 puters that should have all i need,here are the specs http://members.tripod.com/flabob237/index-video.html
    ..any recommendations as to what i can do

    i am new to converting vhs to dvd...thx for anyhelp
     
  15. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

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    You can't go wrong with the ADVC-100.
     
  16. Doc409

    Doc409 Active member

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    flabob...I've been researching this for some time now, and I have spent some good money on non-workable solutions. I recently got the ADVC-100 based upon users comments, which make sense in light of what I have encountered with other solutions. These other solutions, which are mostly PCI cards, tend to drop frames, and have problems with the audio-video synch. I would also point out that Canopus is a leader in the video area, and makes a professional grade encoder called ProCoder which has worked magic for me. All in all, I would say the Canopus folks know what they are doing. I'm starting my VHS backup project this next week, and will be sure to post my results.

    I believe the 100 has been replaced by the 110. However, the 100 is available on ebay for under $150. As rebootjim pointed out earlier in the thread, it also unlocks Macrovision.

     
  17. flabob

    flabob Regular member

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    ok cool :O))thx reboot...is it pretty easy to hook up
     
  18. Videopro1

    Videopro1 Guest

    All you do is plug it into a firewire port on your computer & you are ready
     
  19. flabob

    flabob Regular member

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    that sounds nice...this may sound like a dunm question, but i really dont know...

    so, i have to hook a cable to a vsh player..then a fire wire to my computer
     
  20. Videopro1

    Videopro1 Guest

    You simply run from your audio & video outputs from your vcr into the ADVC100 and from the ADVC100 you run a firewire cable into your computer.
     

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