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Upgrade win 95 to 98

Discussion in 'Windows - General discussion' started by rev, Apr 7, 2007.

  1. rev

    rev Guest

    Hello, help how do i put win 98 over 95.I have been given a 98 disk which when i run it it starts to run and then says that i need to get a upgrade disk to go over win 95.I know the disk is ok as i had a friend instal it on my wifes laptop.Do i have to wipe win95 off and then insert 98, but how do i do that please.Thank You Reverend Peter Burdon
     
  2. Morph416

    Morph416 Active member

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    Back in the day of 98, you had two completely different disks. Upgrade, and Full. Not interchangeable as XP or Vista.

    So...to answer ya question, yes....you'll need to wipe the drive. Full installs cannot perform an upgrade. You wouldn't want to do that from 95 to 98 anyways...would be a disaster.

     
  3. rev

    rev Guest

    ,thanks but how do i do it,or will it be easier to install xp then. Thank You Rev Peter
     
  4. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    Upgrading From Windows 95 To Windows 98 using a upgrade 98 disk


    Upgrading From Windows 95: The 5 Step Process

    Windows 98 Setup will run differently depending upon whether you are upgrading from Windows 95, or another operating system. This article is specific to an upgrade from the Windows 95 operating system.

    Very little user input is required to upgrade an existing Windows 95 installation to Windows 98. Setup is divided up into 5 distinct steps:

    STEP 1:preparing To Run The Setup Wizard

    1 - When you first insert the Windows 98 Upgrade CD into your CD-ROM drive, if Autorun is enabled on your PC, the Windows 98 Setup Splash screen appears to welcome you to the Windows 98 Setup program. Click the "Continue" button. Setup will then perform a few internal housekeeping items, such as creating a "Setuplog.txt" file on your C:\ drive that will record all the steps that the program performs. You can use this log to troubleshoot setup problems should they occur. Another operation that is performed at this time is a check to make sure all virus scanning software is disabled. If Windows 98 Setup detects a virus checking software program running, it will advise you to disable it before continuing with the setup.

    2 - Next, you will see a dialog box with a progress bar informing you that Windows 98 is loading the "Setup Wizard" that will guide you through the rest of the installation process.

    STEP 2: Collecting Information About Your Computer

    1 - When the Setup Wizard has completed loading, you will be presented with a standard Microsoft License agreement. Take the time to read this agreement, since by clicking the "I agree" radio button, you become legally bound to that contract.

    2 - Setup then requires you to enter the 20 character Product ID code. This ID can be found on the back of the CD sleeve.

    3 - After entering the Product ID code, you will see a "Checking System" dialog box. Behind the scenes, Setup is running Scandisk to detect any disk problems with your hard drive.

    4 - The next dialog box displayed is "Initializing Your System." Setup is initializing your system registry, checking the current settings for all hardware devices attached to your system.

    5 - The "Preparing Directory" dialog box lets you know that Setup is preparing the directory (usually C:\Windows) where it will install Windows 98 to, and also validating that enough disk space is available to complete the installation.

    6 - Setup will then give you the opportunity to save your existing Windows 95 system files. Choose "Yes" for this option, if you need the ability to uninstall Windows 98 and revert back to your current Windows 95 system. Choosing "No" will install Windows 98 without the option of uninstalling it at a later date, and will not preserve your existing Windows 95 settings.

    7 - The "Regional Settings" dialog box let's you choose your geographic area.

    8 - The "Create Startup Disk" dialog box prompts you to label a formatted 3.5" diskette into the diskette drive, so that Setup can create and Emergency Startup Disk for you. This used to be optional during Windows 95 setup, however, Windows 98 setup requires you to create a diskette.

    9 - After the creation of the startup diskette, Windows 98 Setup prepare to load all the source files onto your computer.



    STEP 3: Copying Windows 98 Files To Your Computer

    1 - After Setup has collected the information it needs from you and your computer, it starts transferring the Windows 98 files to your computer. During this phase, Windows 98 Setup does not require any user input. A progress bar is displayed to show you the percentage of the task completed, and the approximate time remaining to complete the setup operation.

    CAUTION: Do not interrupt file copying. If Setup is interrupted during the file-copying phase, Windows 98 may not run when you restart your computer because Windows 98 will not have all of the necessary files to start. If you interrupt Setup during this phase, you must run Setup again.

    STEP 4: Restarting Your Computer

    1 - After Setup finishes transferring the needed Windows 98 system files to your system, you are prompted to restart your computer. You do not have to reply to this dialog box, since the restart will automatically occur in 15 seconds.

    2 - When the computer restarts, you'll see a splash screen that says "Getting ready to start Windows 98 for the first time." During this operation, Windows 98 is validating that the files it installed are correct.

    STEP 5: Setting Up Hardware and Finalizing Settings

    1- After Setup restarts your computer for the first time, Windows 98 then detects the hardware you have installed on your computer. This is very different from the Windows 95 Setup, where detecting your computer's devices occurred prior to the file copy phase of Setup. Performing hardware detection after restarting your computer is more reliable and less likely to create problems that cause the computer to stop responding.

    2 - After hardware detection, Windows 98 configures the Control Panel, Programs on the Start menu, the Windows Help System, MS-DOS program settings, adjusts installed programs so they launch faster, sets your time zone and saves the new system configuration.

    3 - When Setup finishes setting up hardware and adjusting your system configuration settings, Setup restarts your computer for the second time. When the computer restarts, it builds a driver information database, and sets up personalized settings for the Internet Explorer 4 browsing software, Start menu, Online services, Volume Control, and Channels.

    4 - When you see the "Welcome to Windows 98" dialog box congratulate yourself on a successful upgrade.
     
  5. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    Installing Windows 98 from Windows 95

    You need to have your bootdisk with cd rom drivers installed on it. You'll need to fdisk and format the drive as well as setup the drive to your liking. I still use partitions in my systems just to stay organized. Your installation should be to your liking but, if you want one big partition (up to 8.4gb), you will need Windows 95b or Windows 98 bootdisk with the FAT32 option to do this. This article will deal with FAT16 and the Dos fdisk program.

    NOTE: You will need approximately 220 MBytes on your hard drive for this operation. Remember, these instructions are for a "bare" drive with just system files (command.com) and your cd rom drive support. There is no need to put the autoexec.bat and config.sys files on your hard drive. These files can be on your DOS bootdisk and the commands can be given from there.

    After setting up your drive and being able to access your CD Rom drive, you'll need to do the following:

    *

    Go to the C:\> prompt and make a directory/folder named Win98 by typing in the command: md Win98 and press enter.
    *

    Insert your Windows 98 cd rom into the CD Rom drive and access the Win98 folder on it by changing the directory with the cd Win98 command. Type in the command: copy *.* c:\win98 (making sure there are spaces between the commands) and press enter. This will copy the Win98 setup files to your hard drive. When finished, remove the cd rom from the drive.

    From the C:\> prompt, type in cd win98 and press enter. This takes you to the setup files for Windows98. Type setup at the C:\>win98 prompt and press enter. This will start the Windows98 installation. The program will analyze your system and ask you for you're CD KEY number. Don't lose this 25 character number. You'll be prompted for the Upgrade Compliance Check. To locate the verifying copy of Windows, insert the Windows95 cd and use the Browse button and point it to the Win95 folder, or you can type in the path statement in the box.. You will look for: D:\win95. Click Next and continue the installation.

    As with my directions on installing Windows 95, you won't need to dig out your Windows 98 cd rom when making changes to the system after completing the Windows 98 installation. The setup (.cab) files will be permanently installed on your hard drive and this will allow you to make changes, when and if needed, to the operating system. If you don't have the extra 120mb's needed for the folder to keep on your hard drive, you can run the installation from the cd rom drive.

    NOTE: If you install Windows 98 Upgrade from the cd, you will be able to remove it during the verification process. You will remove the Windows 98 cd and install the Windows 95 cd and "point" the command line to the D:\win95 folder. When completed, Windows 98 wizard will inform you to reinstall the Windows 98 cd and continue the installation.

    The only other folder you need from the Windows 98 cd rom is the Tools folder. This contains some useful utilities like TweakUI and RegClean. This folder can be installed after your completion of installing Windows 98. If you choose to, you can copy this folder to the hard drive just like you copied the .cab files in the instructions above.

    more info here
    http://members.aol.com/weendoggy/win9x.htm
     
  6. rev

    rev Guest

    Thank you but i can not understand any of it.It seems so easy just to put a win 98 disk in and overite it but it refuses to accept it after the wizard.Is there a easy way to do it as i do not understand most of it.Manny Thanks Rev Peter
     
  7. colw

    colw Active member

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    Hey Rev

    Does the Lord know that what you are attempting to do is possibly illegal as you do not appear to own the original disk?

    Read the MS licensing EULA - does not appear to be any dispentations for religions or charities.
     
  8. rev

    rev Guest

    Hello, thank you for that, but my faith says to do what is right and as i am not hurting anyone i think i am ok.You know what it says in the book about the rich man getting into heaven.Still not being able to figure it out so it might not have ment to be. Thank You Rev Peter
     
  9. janrocks

    janrocks Guest

    98 is discontinued.. phone M$ service and they will give you a product key.. They don't care about it any more.

    If this pc was running 95 you have to ask yourself why it has lasted 10 years without being upgraded.

    The wizard is probably failing because it only has something like 8-12 MB of ram to work with. It could be only a 486.. so 98 will struggle. And it's a real possibility the system is still running FAT16. 95 works in a very similar way to 98, most things are in the same place.. device manager works, but isn't so good at detecting hardware.

    95 can tell us lots about the hardware fitted, and whether it is actually worth upgrading. 95 is still a perfectly viable OS for basic word processing apps, and the old office apps seem to be basic but nice.
    Hardware support was never very good, and antique drivers are very hard to find (believe)

    Unless it's at least a pentium133 with more than 32 MB ram fitted I'd be more tempted to leave it as 95 and consider it a museum piece..

    If you want to try upgrading then before anything else post the sysrem specs.. CPU, amount of physical memory and make of the MOBO..
     
  10. pc55

    pc55 Guest

    YOU SHOULD GET WINDOWS XP!!#
    WIN XP

    **annoying extra rubbish removed from post**
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 10, 2007
  11. creaky

    creaky Moderator Staff Member

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    @pc55 - less than half a dozen posts on your first day here and they're all, well, not good.
     
  12. janrocks

    janrocks Guest

    Hi creaky.. again?. That's 3 times in 3 threads so far, one after the other.
    You know I roam looking for people with older hardware because like me they are probably not in a position to cough up lots of cash on all singing all dancing hardware (unlike some spoiled little brats)..

    I hope rev comes back, as I have been given an old 486 which is still running 95 well. I may be able to help him/her get the best out of it.

    Seeing as the troll obviously has nothing of any worth to contribute I'd respectfully suggest that he returns to doing his school homework.. With the assistance of the AD moderators in freeing up the needed time it could be quite profitable.
    Then again.. the Disney forums are in need of another kicking dog.....
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 10, 2007
  13. creaky

    creaky Moderator Staff Member

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    i've still got a Windows 98SE machine here somewhere, rarely gets used but does the job. Win95 is/was ok but as we all know, only in the OSR2 variant. Oh the joy of messing about with the winsock.dll etc way back (ok i mean what a pain in the backside). Anyway, I've long forgotten most of the Win95/98 tweaks, even used to have multiple boot options (himem.sys etc) in Win95 for games/normal use etc so as to make best use of my..wait for it....4MB of RAM, shock horror..(started out with 1MB but it couldn't play Doom! so i bought 4MB which at the time cost me an extortionate £120).
    I've still got all my original Win95 disks (all versions), WinMe (don't tell anyone!) 98/98SE etc etc but there's just no point using them anymore since XP came along as i only have 3 machines old enough to warrant running ancient OSes and 2 of them are in bits
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2007
  14. janrocks

    janrocks Guest

    Know that so well.. Still have all my 95 disks too, from upgrading from 3.1 (I'm getting old.. need to lay off the coffee), and the books (still sealed) and loads and loads of other software..

    Why I'm interested in helping out here is I have been given a really nice old Compaq presario 486sx which is still fully working. I wanted to use it as a printer server because of it's small size, but it has the system partition on the hdd, and I don't want to make a brick of something that has lasted so long. A plus. I shoved 98MB of ram in it and you should see how fast 95 is with a stack of memory.

    The downside for my intended use is the only piece which doesn't seem to want to work is the network card... 95 doesn't know what device it is, and refuses to detect it. tried some live linux..but the graphics capabilities are poor so it's going to stay on 95 and be tinkered with. Should be good for dusting off all those old dos games and the early windows ones.. like doom2 and Unreal.
     

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