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Vertical jitter from vhs analog capture

Discussion in 'Video capturing from analog sources' started by darktree, Aug 23, 2015.

  1. darktree

    darktree Newbie

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    Hello all, I have captured some old home movies to my hard drive, and now need to clean them up (hopefully with a filter or two in virtualdub or after fx).

    The problem is the video has an inconsistent vertical jitter that wraps the top of the video down to the bottom about every half second to full second. I was wondering if there were any filters you guys use for virtualdub that can recognize these jittery/vertically wrapped frames and move them into place.

    It is a 1 hour video, and this happens for about half of it, so scrubbing through 100,000 frames just isn't going to happen. I tried to do what I could with the VCR tracking, but it didn't improve the vertical jitter.

    Please see uploaded video sample I put on youtube:
    and also I attached a screenshot of the troublesome vertically wrapping jitter.

    Additional notes:
    • I deinterlaced the video in virtualdub so that we could just highlight the issue at hand that I cannot fix.
    • Showbiz 2 is the software used to capture (directly to mpg)
    • sometimes use Movivo if Showbiz 2 gives me problems
    • virtualdub used to convert to avi using x264 codec
    • Magnavox MWD2206 DVD VCR Combo is the VHS player I am using
    • The VHS in question is a homemade VHS made in 1989 comprised of 8mm footage shot in the '60s to the '80s
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Aug 24, 2015
  2. attar

    attar Senior member

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    Have you tried another capture from a different deck?

    I would seriously suggest that you post this at the VideoHelp site.
    List the name of the deck, the name of the capture device and the capture software.
    The format that it was captured in (mpeg, avi etc).
    Upload a short sample of the captured footage showing the problem (i.e not re-encoded for YouTube) to a sharing site like MediaFire.
    AviDemux can be used to open the video: set the Video and Audio to Copy and the output the same as the input.

    http://forum.videohelp.com/
     
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  3. darktree

    darktree Newbie

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    Updated the original post to include more information, but not at home at the moment, but I also unmarked the video as private so it should be viewable now. When I get home I'll upload a more raw rip, but even then It will be reencoded as the raw file is like 45GB.
     
  4. darktree

    darktree Newbie

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  5. dp70

    dp70 Member

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    A video tape plays back best on the machine that recorded it. There are differences in head gap design over the life of the video tape recorder. It is a tracking error, where part of an adjacent field is picked-up by the video head.
     
  6. ps355528

    ps355528 Regular member

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    It's the old story with analog sources.. crap in crap out :) .. if it doesn't play properly on the initial playback you can't do much afterwards except to go through frame by frame.. and as you say "not going to happen"..

    The best way is to get a decent pro of 4 head vhs machine.. cheap as chips these days.. get it professionally aligned and set up (pro machines need this every 6 months or so.. but won't have been done now for a decade or more.. which will cost, even if you can find somebody with the alignment tapes still in business) and then try to grab the best possible initial content..

    One other thought.. it could be the field sync pulses into the capture card are too strong.. now then.. inside on the main board there might be a little control labelled up "F sync amp" or something to that effect.. as old tv's used to generate their own field sync (flywheel) from their own oscillator and only triggered to the incoming pulses.. the level seen by the tv was usually more stable (tied to a set peak level) .. in fact this was so well understood back in the day that a lot of manufacturers used to use an excessive sync level in the video signal (it's in the blanking area) to make copying from one machine to another virtually impossible.. long before macrovision protection etc. I would be prepared to put money on this machine/tape combination working flawlessly on a 1980's tv ;)
     
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