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Video quality

Discussion in 'Other video questions' started by tthom, Oct 12, 2012.

  1. tthom

    tthom Member

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    Hi,

    I am having issues with .Avi files recently they seem very poor quality not sure if its my laptop but my laptop is only a few months old with onboard intel HD graphics

    does anyone else have issues with this
     
  2. aldan

    aldan Active member

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    where do the avi files come from and what are your laptop specs?
     
  3. tthom

    tthom Member

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    Just some of my dvd backups,

    Intel core i3 370M
    5Gb Ram
    Intel HD Graphics
    15.6" HD LED LCD screen
     
  4. scorpNZ

    scorpNZ Active member

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    Why do they seem poor quality what do they look like on what you were playing them on before,what settings were used to convert to avi & what size is the avi file

    install easy mediainfo then post the full info here however you can't expect much quality when a file is under 2gb or a video bitrate under say 2500


    EDIT: regarding laptop make & model with a link to its specs would be better

    try adjusting your graphics settings from performance to quality
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2012
  5. tthom

    tthom Member

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    I cant mind the settings was old avi's I had on a hard drive..

    They look slightly pixelated.. so you would recommend keeping the bitrate above 2500 and 2gb


    hxxp://www.gogodigital.co.uk/acer-aspire-5733-core-i3-370m-15-6-hd-laptop-5gb-500gb.html
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2012
  6. scorpNZ

    scorpNZ Active member

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    I Personally prefer to use the size setting in staxrip rather than constant bitrate as the file can come out larger than what i want depending on original input size of the video,so i set it to 2gb oddly enough the bitrate can come out as low as 1500 or high as 6000 (the lower being a movie the higher being an anime)

    i've recently started encoding all my dvd's with staxrip (would prefer to use vidcoder & mp4 x264 encde,but need output to be extremely compatible with many devices so am stuck with avi xvid mainly for playback on original modded xbox) quality wise the 77 i've done so far look pretty good on a hd 19" dell monitor next test will be on a friends widescreen 42" tv as i don't have a large lcd tv at this time,originally i did use vidcoder & set output to 2-3gb using x264 & a mate said they look real good on a large tv,unfortunately the xbox had issues with x264


    http://support.acer.com/acerpanam/notebook/2011/Acer/Aspire/Aspire5733/Aspire5733sp2.shtml
     
  7. tthom

    tthom Member

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    thanks for the advice mate
     
  8. hello_hello

    hello_hello Member

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    If these are "old" AVIs and they don't look at good as the used to using your new laptop then it's either a decoding issue (which player are you using?) or it simply that the new laptop has a better display and you're seeing stuff which was previously "hidden".

    When you're encoding video, forget file sizes and forget bitrates. You can't make generalisations regarding either in terms of quality. Both will change according to the resolution and how hard the video is to compress.
    You definitely don't want to encode using a fixed bitrate but picking a file size mightn't necessarily be the best method either because by picking a file size you're basically picking the quality, except you don't know what the quality will be. Xvid has a "target qualizer" method of encoding which runs a single pass encode aiming for a particular quality, depending on the quantiser you select (it's not "true" quality based encoding but it's pretty close). A target quantiser of 2 is maximum quality for Xvid. If you encode 5 different movies using the same target quantiser you'll end up with five different sized encodes but the quality of each will be pretty much the same relative to the source. You'll probably be surprised as to how much the average bitrate varies between encodes.

    When it comes to converting DVDs to AVI, AutoGK would be a program I'd still recommend. If file size isn't an issue try using AutoGK's quality based (single pass) encoding method after selecting your desired video width and audio type. The default quality setting of 75% is fine and you'll probably not see any difference between 75% and using 100% quality but the file sizes will be smaller. 75% quality is considered to be Xvid's optimum file size/quality ratio.
    If you prefer to pick a file size when converting using AutoGK leave the video and audio settings on "auto" until you know what you're doing. AutoGK will run a compression test and pick the best resizer, resolution and audio type accordingly, giving you the best quality encode it can.

    Converting DVDs using the x264 encoder (MKV or MP4) should give you better quality than converting using Xvid/AVI. x264 also has an option to encode using a "true" quality based encoding method rather than picking a file size. The default quality setting (CRF value) most programs use is 20. Higher values produce lower quality. CRF18 is generally as low as most people go, but anywhere between 18 and 22 should look very good. Unless you specifically want to output a particular file size, CRF encoding is the best method to use.
    Once again, when you pick a CRF value you're picking the quality but the final file size will be unknown. If you pick a file size the quality is then the unknown factor.
     
  9. scorpNZ

    scorpNZ Active member

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    The one thing you could try is change graphic card setting from performance to quality & or see if media player has a soften function it should smooth out any pixelation
     

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