1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Wav & Cue files conversion

Discussion in 'Audio' started by butchr, Aug 21, 2004.

  1. butchr

    butchr Guest

    Hey everyone, pulling my freak'n hair out. Or what's left of it. I've got an audio file that contains a large Wav file and a Cue file. I've tried Nero 6 and ISO Buster both and the result is nothing but static. I've never done this particular type of file conversion before so I don't know if the file is corrupt or I'm doing something wrong or using the wrong application. I use WMP to view or listen to my files and wav is enabled. Anyone have any suggestions?

    Thanks everyone,
    Butchr
     
  2. matinzen

    matinzen Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2003
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2004
  3. butchr

    butchr Guest

    I reread my post and it does sound confusing, I'm sorry. I unzipped a audio file and the result was a large WAV file and a Cue file. Trying to listen the the Wav file the result was static (no audio). So my thought was that it had to be recoded since it came with a cue file. I've never seen this before. Thanks for the reply.

    Butchr
     
  4. matinzen

    matinzen Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2003
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
  5. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    5,735
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    118
    butchr

    The wav file should play on its own, i'm not sure why it included a cue file as well. Have you checked Windows Volume control? You get to it by going to start, programs, accessories, entertainment and then volume control. When its opened check to see wav/mp2 mute isn't checked.
     
  6. babelfish

    babelfish Regular member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Messages:
    491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    SOMETIMES cue files are used to show where the breals should be in one long track... for example a lot of dance mixes are one long file that spand 80mins etc - but the cue tells you where each track starts and ends.. - by the looks of it the wav is corrupt maybe...

    how about importing into a wav editor such as soundforge to see the sound waves?
     
  7. maconvert

    maconvert Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2004
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    It sounds like a dts encoded wav file. The cue does and should reveal the song lengths. It will only play if you have a dts decoder. So to burn it on a mac use Jam, and drag the one wav file in Jam as many times as there are distinct songs. Then simply edit the start and end times and burn. Play it on a DVD player with DTS and voila, a 5.1 surround audio disc.
     
  8. butchr

    butchr Guest

    Thanks guys for your responses. Hey Maconvert, you wouldn't pull my leg would you? What is DTS? I guess if I did know I still don't have a Mac. Will do a search on it and see. I almost feel like I'm getting sent on a snipe hunt. LOL Take care and thanks.

    Butchr
     
  9. babelfish

    babelfish Regular member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Messages:
    491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    Digital Theater Systems - its like 5.1 with attitude... you see it on a lot of blockbuster-type DVDs
     
  10. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2003
    Messages:
    954
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    It is one of 2 things.
    A/. As already posted, a DTS-WAV file. What does it look like if you open it up in a wave editor? If it looks like a solid block & not a usual WAV file, it is indeed a DTS-WAV file.
    B/. A different sample rate.

    The DTS version is the most likely answer.
    What you must do if this is the case is burn to a normal Audio CD, by loading the cue file, and play back through a DTS decoder, or all you will get is static.
    You will NOT be abl;e to play this file in any WAV editor, but if you have either the latest version of Power DVD or WinDVD installed, it should play back okay.

    This will almost certainly be a 5.1 Surround CD, home made from a stereo upmix into Surround.

     
  11. butchr

    butchr Guest

    Thanks everyone for your replies. I do have 5.0 Power DVD but I don't have the upgrade version which supports DTS. Meanwhile I picked up a replacement file encoded with APE before coming here. Learn something new everyday. Is there a standalone dts converter? Perhaps a pluggin for WMP? I will start goggle'n. Once again thanks.

    Butchr
     
  12. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2003
    Messages:
    954
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    Answer to both questions is no and no.
    You can try looking for VideoLAn player though, as with the correct codecs that may well be okay.

    You'll be better off with the extension to your existing DVD player though, as installing multiple players can easily lead to conflicts.
     
  13. butchr

    butchr Guest

    Sorry to take so long get'n back. Thanks Wilkes and everyone else for your generous help. I will get the DTS add-on for power DVD. I'm starting to see quite a few files encoded DTS. I bet they sound freak'n great.

    Butchr

     
  14. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2003
    Messages:
    954
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    Done well, they do indeed sound great.
    Much better than MP3, that's for certain.
    DTS only "throws away" around 3/4 of your original audio, but it's big advantage is that due to some clever encoding, you can use it to put 24 bit audio onto a regular CD. In Surround.

    Okay - it must be played back through a DTS decoder, but for my money it's a viable alternative to full blown DVD-Audio, although not as good in terms of quality. It is definitely a lot easier than DVD-Video to author. No messing around with graphics or menus - just encode to DTS-WAV, and burn the resulting file to an Audio CD as you usually do.
     

Share This Page