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whats the difference between +R and -R

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by degraw, Nov 11, 2004.

  1. degraw

    degraw Member

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    if one does not work, does that mean the other won't?
     
  2. catfreak

    catfreak Active member

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     ... The standard known as DVD-R/RW (this is a combination of DVD-R and DVD-RW-note the "dash" in the name) is supported by Pioneer and other manufacturers and had taken an early lead. The other competing standard, DVD+RW (note the "plus" in place of the dash), is being backed by HP and Sony and is becomming more popular ...

     ... The situation is similar to that of the competing VHS and Beta video standards decades ago. But unlike the video tapes of old, the two main competing DVD standards are designed to create discs that may be read by most consumer DVD movie players. And writers supporting either standard can read commercial Hollywood DVD movies, as well as work as CD readers and burners ...

     ... Both DVD-R and DVD+R let you write a single time to a DVD (similar to CD-R technology). Once you finalize a DVD-R or DVD+R disc, you can't write data to that disc again. Note that DVD+R capabilities were not available on the first DVD+RW drives from HP and Sony, and drives with this capability are just coming to market. On the other hand, DVD-RW and DVD+RW technologies let you write continually write to a DVD, just as you can to a CD-RW disc or a floppy ...

     ... A third DVD rewritable standard, DVD-RAM, runs a distant third. This technology is incompatible with commercial DVD players-data stored on a DVD-RAM disc can't be read by DVD movie players, or many other DVD drives. The only real use for DVD-RAM is as a high-capacity network backup medium. DVD-RAM discs are housed in cartridges and hold between 2.6 GB and 9.4 GB. DVD-RAM is pretty much confined to Panasonic machines ...

     ... DVD-R and DVD-RW media, as well as DVD+R and DVD+RW media, are generally compatible with newer DVD movie players and DVD-ROM drives on PCs. At the moment, there are differences between manufacturers of different DVD drives, but acceptance of DVD discs by different drives will improve over time. This evolution will probably resemble that of the early days of CD-R and CD-RW drives. You may recall that initially, older CD players couldn't read all the media that newer ones could ...

     ... As with Beta versus VHS, DVD standards will eventually iron themselves out. The difference is that whether you choose DVD-RW or DVD+RW, you should, in theory, be able to create DVD discs that can be read by most DVD-ROM drives and DVD movie players. And the more the standards evolve, the stronger this compatibility will become ...

     ... More recently there has been a trend for DVD Recorder manufacturers, notably Sony and Lite-On, to by-pass the whole "plus" and "dash" issue by producing machines that work equally well with both formats ...

     ... The crucial difference among the standards is based on which manufacturers adhere to which standards. Similar to the old VHS/Beta tape wars when VCRs first hit the markets, different manufacturers support different standards ...

     ...DVD+R and DVD+RW formats are supported by Philips, Sony, Hewlett-Packard, Dell, Ricoh, Yamaha and others ...

     ...DVD+R is a recordable DVD format similar to CD-R. A DVD+R can only record data once and then the data becomes permanent on the disc. The disc can not be re-recorded ...

     ... DVD+RW is a re-recordable format similar to CD-RW. The data on a DVD+RW disc can be erased and recorded over numerous times without damaging the medium ...

     ...DVDs created by a +R/+RW device can be read by most commercial DVD-ROM players ...

     ... DVD-R, DVD-RW and DVD-RAM are supported by Panasonic, Toshiba, Apple Computer, Hitachi, NEC, Pioneer, Samsung and Sharp.

     ... DVD-R is a recordable DVD format similar to CD-R and DVD+R. A DVD-R can only record data once and then the data becomes permanent on the disc. The disc can not be re-recorded. There also are two additional standards for DVD-R disks: DVD-RG for general use, and DVD-RA for authoring, which is used for mastering DVD video or data and is not typically available to the general public ...

     ... DVD-RW is a re-recordable format similar to CD-RW or DVD+RW. The data on a DVD-RW disc can be erased and recorded over numerous times without damaging the medium ...

     ... DVDs created by a -R/-RW device can be read by most commercial DVD-ROM players ...

     ... DVD-RAM discs can be recorded and erased repeatedly but are only compatible with devices manufactured by the companies (Panasonic) that support the DVD-RAM format. DVD-RAM discs are typically housed in cartridges ...

     ... DVD-ROM was the first DVD standard to hit the market and is a read-only format. The video or game content is pressed into the DVD once and the DVD will run on any DVD-ROM-equipped device ...



     ... If you have problems using one format, and you're using quality media, try the other format ...



     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2004
  3. degraw

    degraw Member

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    damn that was some serious info...thanks a bunch
     
  4. gx240

    gx240 Member

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    That was a very informative post, and it doesn't seem that there is a clear choice. Therefore I have a couple questions as well. Some of those companies you mentioned produce complete lines of computers, could there be a conflict with the opposing format? For example would a DVD-R burner have any conflict with my Sony PC? (I realize this is unlikely, but I have heard of situations where hardware makers prevent opposing products from functioning.)

    If I want to purchase a DVD burner to do nothing but back up files from my computer, is there really any reason to use one format over another? Is there a slight difference in reading/writing speed, reliability, or shelf life of the disk? Does one format's blank DVDs cost more? (I did look around for prices, and most sites seemed to sell both formats for approximately the same price. Is this generally true?)
     
  5. catfreak

    catfreak Active member

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     ... Computers don't seem to favor one format over another ... I recommend buying a DVD writer that writes to either format since they're very common and affordable ... As far as which format to use .. Hmmmm .. That's a good one .. Personally, I use RICOHJPNR01 coded RiDATA (+R) discs .. This is because for my purposes (video) I get maximum compatibility with other players in my house ...

     ... I do have several friends that swear by -R for data and +R for video ... (of course they never swear around children) ...
     
  6. popai

    popai Member

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    That was a very good information. But what is the real difference beyond the standard? Is the laser wave length? One record 1´s and the other 0´s? ...?

    Thanks anyway.
     

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