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Which Media Lasts The Longest

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by mini_mod, Mar 20, 2005.

  1. mini_mod

    mini_mod Member

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    Just wondering if anyone knew of any reference material or some actual data that showed which media (manufacturer) stood up the best and longest with time.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2005
  2. rayboy

    rayboy Regular member

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    It's too early to ask this questions, because according the Dvd spec the data on dvd preserve up to 100 years, so I can assure you that the data can preserve at least 50 years only if you are using a good dvd media, if you not using a good media, just after burn, you play back you will get some block/bad mosaic/loosing data right away.
     
  3. mini_mod

    mini_mod Member

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    Just wondering cause lately I have read a lot of posts where people are claiming that some media is only lasting 8 - 12 months. I am having luck with the media I use, but I don't want to run into the situation where all my backups are degraded within a year.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2005
  4. movies27

    movies27 Regular member

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    Fuji is the best to me.
     
  5. Higgsbsun

    Higgsbsun Regular member

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    The projected longevity figures for DVD media are based on accelerated testing (very high light, heat and moisture levels), and the actual real-world figures for CD's which have been around quite a while now. DVD's are too new to have much "real-world" longevity data, so the quoted figures are guesstimates.

    The best you can do at present is to buy quality media such as TY or MCC and try to get the best possible burn you can and then store the disks carefully.

    Only a small amount of degradation due to ageing or environmental factors is needed to push a marginal burn over the edge into unreadability, whereas a good burn will be able to take far more punishment before failing.
     
  6. Nuke_m

    Nuke_m Member

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    Storage method is vital.

    quote:
    Wayne Arvidson, Iomega Storage: "CDs and DVDs in their writeable format do have a shelf life. They will, over a period of time, after exposure to light and ultraviolet, deteriorate. One quick way to do it is leave on on the dashboard of your car and it'll be gone by the time you're done with lunch."
     
  7. Higgsbsun

    Higgsbsun Regular member

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    In the UK your disk would be safe for at least a month ;o)
     
  8. squizzle

    squizzle Active member

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    I think some of that might depend on how often you watch the movie too. Example: I have all the Family Guy discs burned and these were the first to not play in my player. I watch these all the time, which is why I think that's the reason.
     
  9. Higgsbsun

    Higgsbsun Regular member

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    Squizzle, this is something I've wondered about for a while. The main killer for DVDR media seems to be exposure to strong light. If the burned disks are stored out of strong light, then the most intense light they will ever see will be the reading laser of drive when you play them.

    I have never been able to find any info on dye bleaching by the reading laser. It may be that the wavelength of the reading beam does not cause problems, but I've never seen this confirmed.

    Anyone want to volunteer to leave a disk on constant repeat play for a week or two as a test?
     
  10. squizzle

    squizzle Active member

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    The light may be it, but I think it may also be the heat. Actually, any extreme temps, being hot or cold. Light probably could do it too. I have experienced a lot of "media rot" on CD-R's, once I switched to the black CD-R's I haven't had a problem with that once. Usually the CD-R's in my car go the fastest, due to weather conditions the car goes through. I went on a road trip once and listened to the same CD like 3 times in a row without a problem, once I tried a 4th time, it just stopped. I took it out, and there was a bubble in the dye (I think that's where it was) and the CD was wrecked. I've seen this on about 5-10% of my non-black CD-R's.

    As far as DVDR's go, I don't keep them in my car so I don't know about the media rot issue there. But, I still believe that after watching the same movie so many times, your disc will degrade somewhat. Maybe my DVD player just gets hotter than others. They say the media will last 20 years or 100 years or whatever, but that's probably only if you put it in a case and never touch it again.
     

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