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Why so many types of programs?

Discussion in 'DVDR' started by hctr3, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. hctr3

    hctr3 Member

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    I have read alot of posts about burning / backing up DVD's. All of them have been helpfull, but at the same time a little confusing. Most posts suggest using Any DVD / DVD Shrink or DVD Decrypter then Nero. But from what I have also seen or read, it sounds like you can do the entire process with just DVD Decrypter. Is this correct? Or does that program do one part then you need another program to finish the process?

    Thanks
     
  2. saugmon

    saugmon Senior member

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    Dvd decrypter does not compress those larger movies "dvd-9" to fit the standard dvd-r/+r disc.It also has a burn engine. On those small dvd-5 movies where no compression occurs,it is a lot quicker using this program only.It's a more powerful ripper.


    Those larger movies will have to be compressed,aka dvd shrink, to fit the basic dvdr disc.Dvd shrink does not contain a burn engine,it automatically works with dvd decryptor or nero to do its burning.Since most of my movies are dvd-9's,I just use dvd shrink and nero only.

    With all the newer encryptions coming out, dvd shrink can't rip the movie by itself,enabling anydvd and having it run in the background allows dvd shrink to rip it.

    Dvd shrink,nero and anydvd are doing a great job for me,on 95% of my backups. I still keep dvd decryptor around for problematic encryptions and scratched discs.
     
  3. hctr3

    hctr3 Member

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    Ok, so if I just wanted to burn a movie without menus or anything like that, can I use DVD Decrypter by itself? Even if it is a longer movie? How can I tell if a movie will fit without shrinking it?

    Thanks for your help.
     
  4. squizzle

    squizzle Active member

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    You cannot take just the movie with Decrypter(unless someone knows something I don't). Decrypter alone will work if you're trying to burn from a DVD5 (single layer, less than 4.35 GB). A dual layer (DVD9) will require compression, or stripping off menus, features, etc.
     
  5. saugmon

    saugmon Senior member

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    dvd decrypter will tell you the size of those movies,look on the right side of screen when you insert the disc.example 8,120,526 : that size will have to be reduced unless using a dvd-9 blank disc.Even many main movie only backups will have to be shrunk,aka lord of the rings.


    I bypass all of that when I use dvd shrink,reauthor,main-movie only,backup-double check all my settings,click ok-whala- a high quality reproduction anywhere from 20 minutes to 2 hrs,depending how large it it and if using shrink's quality enhancements.Even easier now with anydvd running in the background.

    That's why shrink,nero,and anydvd are my main programs.I works for me, you'll have to find what works for you.
     
  6. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    Anydvd by slysoft OR DVD43 is required to bypass both the css (copy protections) which are encrypted into most commercially made dvds and the rce (region code).
    With out these programs running in the background you are unable to backup your discs.

    Nero , decrypter , clone work well with these programs.
    Shrink has it's own ripper built in.

    Heres some useless info on disc sizes and properties for you to browse through:
    All this info is readily available to read on afterdawn if you hunt for it .

    andmerr

    DVD-9 is single sided, dual layered.
    The numbering is down to storage capacity. DVD-9 (Single Sided souble layered) is 9GB



    While consumers around the world have enjoyed burning their own DVDs for a few years now, the inevitable question of “what’s next” is now upon the industry. Certainly, blue laser technologies such as Blu-Ray will one day become affordable and prevalent; however, consumers today are still very much in love with DVD. The DVD format is mature, high-quality content is widely available, and players are low cost and now installed in approximately 53 percent of U.S. households.

    Dual layer DVD technology is not new. Commonly called “DVD9,” Hollywood has been churning out major motion pictures on stamped dual layer DVD Discs for years. How else could they include the full length movie plus all the bonus materials commonly found on today’s DVDs? Because dual layer technology has always been part of the DVD specifications, dual layer DVD recording on the desktop is the natural progression of single layer 4.7GB recordable technology.

    Dual layer DVD recordable discs offer up to four hours of high quality MPEG-2 video, or up to 8.5GB of data on a single-sided disc with two individual recordable “layers.” Dual layer capable recorders will have the ability to record on the new dual layer DVD recordable discs, as well as on traditional single layer DVD discs and CDs too. Want more? Because a recorded dual layer DVD disc is compliant with the DVD9 specification, the discs are compatible with most consumer DVD players and computer DVD-ROM drives already installed in the market.

    How Are Dual Layer Discs Recorded?
    Single-sided dual layer recordable discs are constructed by one dummy polycarbonate platter base and the other one that contains a single organic recording layer. Dual layer recordable discs contain two organic dye recording layers (termed L0 and L1, respectively) between dual polycarbonate bases and semi-reflective metal layers separated by a transparent spacing layer. Single layer DVDs have a wobbled pre-groove molded into the polycarbonate base that controls the rotation speed of the disc and provide the addressing scheme for the disc. In a dual layer recordable DVD, each recording layer has its own wobbled pre-groove that controls rotation speed and addressing for that layer. However, the entire “table of contents” and system area of a dual layer recordable disc is contained only on the first recordable layer (L0).


    cgram7
    Newbie
    29. August 2004 @ 13:26 Report an offensive post
    Keep in mind that manufacturers quote the capacity of a writable DVD disc in decimal (base 10) rather than binary (base 2) notation so a 4.7 GB disc stores 4.7 billion bytes [4:700,000,000 bytes ÷ 1000 = 4,700,000 KB ÷ 1000 = 4,700 MB ÷ 1000 = 4.7 GB] . Expressed in binary notation (as is typical with CD-R, CD-RW and most operating systems) the same disc has a capacity of roughly 4.38 GB [4:700,000,000 bytes ÷ 1024 = 4,589,844 KB ÷ 1024 = 4,482.27 MB ÷ 1024 = 4.38 GB] .



    Capacities of DVD:
    For reference, a CD-ROM holds about 650 megabytes, which is 0.64 gigabytes or 0.68 billion bytes. In the list below, SS/DS means single-sided/double-sided, SL/DL/ML means single-layer/dual-layer/mixed-layer (mixed means single layer on one side, dual layer on the other side), gig means gigabytes (2^30), BB means billions of bytes (10^9). See note about giga vs. billion in section 7.2.

    DVD-5 (12 cm, SS/SL) 4.37 gig (4.70 BB) of data, over 2 hours of video
    DVD-9 (12 cm, SS/DL) 7.95 gig (8.54 BB), about 4 hours
    DVD-10 (12 cm, DS/SL) 8.74 gig (9.40 BB), about 4.5 hours
    DVD-14 (12 cm, DS/ML) 12.32 gig (13.24 BB), about 6.5 hours
    DVD-18 (12 cm, DS/DL) 15.90 gig (17.08 BB), over 8 hours
    DVD-1 (8 cm, SS/SL) 1.36 gig (1.46 BB), about half an hour
    DVD-2 (8 cm, SS/DL) 2.47 gig (2.66 BB), about 1.3 hours
    DVD-3 (8 cm, DS/SL) 2.72 gig (2.92 BB), about 1.4 hours
    DVD-4 (8 cm, DS/DL) 4.95 gig (5.32 BB), about 2.5 hours
    DVD-R 1.0 (12 cm, SS/SL) 3.68 gig (3.95 BB)
    DVD-R 2.0 (12 cm, SS/SL) 4.37 gig (4.70 BB)
    DVD-R 2.0 (12 cm, DS/SL) 8.75 gig (9.40 BB)
    DVD-RW 2.0 (12 cm, SS/SL) 4.37 gig (4.70 BB)
    DVD-RW 2.0 (12 cm, DS/SL) 8.75 gig (9.40 BB)
    DVD+R 2.0 (12 cm, SS/SL) 4.37 gig (4.70 BB)
    DVD+R 2.0 (12 cm, DS/SL) 8.75 gig (9.40 BB)
    DVD+RW 2.0 (12 cm, SS/SL) 4.37 gig (4.70 BB)
    DVD+RW 2.0 (12 cm, DS/SL) 8.75 gig (9.40 BB)
    DVD-RAM 1.0 (12 cm, SS/SL) 2.40 gig (2.58 BB)
    DVD-RAM 1.0 (12 cm, DS/SL) 4.80 gig (5.16 BB)
    DVD-RAM 2.0 (12 cm, SS/SL) 4.37 gig (4.70 BB)*
    DVD-RAM 2.0 (12 cm, DS/SL) 8.75 gig (9.40 BB)*
    DVD-RAM 2.0 (8 cm, SS/SL) 1.36 gig (1.46 BB)*
    DVD-RAM 2.0 (8 cm, DS/SL) 2.47 gig (2.65 BB)*
    CD-ROM (12 cm, SS/SL, 74 minutes) 0.635 gig (0.682 BB)
    CD-ROM (12 cm, SS/SL, 80 minutes) 0.687 gig (0.737 BB)
    CD-ROM (8 cm, SS/SL) 0.180 gig (0.194 BB)
    DDCD-ROM (12 cm, SS/SL) 1.270 gig (1.364 BB)
    DDCD-ROM (8 cm, SS/SL) 0.360 gig (0.387 BB)

    * Formatted DVD-RAM discs have slightly less than stated capacity. For example, the contents of a completely full DVD-R will not quite fit on a DVD-RAM.

    Tip: It takes about two gigabytes to store one hour of average video.

    The increase in capacity from CD-ROM is due to: 1) smaller pit length (~2.08x), 2) tighter tracks (~2.16x), 3) slightly larger data area (~1.02x), 4) more efficient channel bit modulation (~1.06x), 5) more efficient error correction (~1.32x), 6) less sector overhead (~1.06x). Total increase for a single layer is about 7 times a standard CD-ROM. There's a slightly different explanation at <www.mpeg.org/MPEG/DVD/General/Gain.html>.

    The capacity of a dual-layer disc is slightly less than double that of a single-layer disc. The laser has to read "through" the outer layer to the inner layer (a distance of 20 to 70 microns). To reduce inter-layer crosstalk, the minimum pit length of both layers is increased from 0.4 um to 0.44 um. To compensate, the reference scanning velocity is slightly faster, 3.84 m/s, as opposed to 3.49 m/s for single layer discs. Longer pits, spaced farther apart, are easier to read correctly and are less susceptible to jitter. The increased length means fewer pits per revolution, which results in reduced capacity per layer.

    Note: Older versions of Windows that use FAT16 instead of UDF, FAT32, or NTFS to read a DVD may run into problems with the 4 gigabyte volume size limit. FAT16 also has a 2 gigabyte file size limit, while FAT32 has a 4 gigabyte file size limit. (NTFS has a 2 terabyte limit, so we're ok there for a while.)

     

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