1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

WinMPG vs. TMPGEnc?

Discussion in 'DVDR' started by crysania, Aug 20, 2003.

  1. crysania

    crysania Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Just got my first DVD writer and have been perusing the user guides to figure out how to put my divx-encoded home movies on DVD.
    I started encoding to MPEG2 yesterday using WinMPG, and my 400MB avi file (a half-hour fairly high-quality video) became a 3GB mpg file. Is this normal?
    Would there be any advantage to using TMPGEnc instead?

    Assuming all goes well and I successfully convert, say, an hour’s worth of my avi files to mpeg2 and then create the vob files, can I then use something like DVDShrink to fit them on one DVD?
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2003
  2. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2003
    Messages:
    6,011
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    116
    The half hour movie encoded to 3GB is completely normal. I use TMPGEnc myslef, but either will do. It can take anywhere between 5-10 hours for encoding a DivX to mpeg2.
     
  3. Yuriv

    Yuriv Regular member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2003
    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    If a 30min DivX file yielded a 3GB file, you must have used a bitrate of almost 13,000Kbits/sec. I don't even think this would be compatible with a set-top DVD player, as the DVD standard allows for up 9.8Mbits/sec (including audio).
    Try lowering the bitrate to yield a smaller file - a little over 8,000kbits/sec should be the max for DVD video (but you can push a little more if you use a low audio bitrate). 30 mins at this bitrate would yield a file of about 1.8GB.
    Also, since you are starting from a highly compressed source, there is not a lot of use using an extremely high bitrate, it won't improve quality as you are limited by the original.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2003
  4. crysania

    crysania Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Here's the info for that particular file:
    File : 387 Mb (387 Mb), duration 0:30:03, type AVI, 1 audio stream(s), quality 68 %
    Video : 57 Mb, 267 Kbps, 29.970 fps, res. 720*480 (4:3), DIV3 = DivX v3 ;-) MPEG-4 (Low-Motion), Supported
    Audio : 330 Mb, 1536 Kbps, 48000 Hz, 2 chan., 0x1 = PCM, Supported
    So what makes it so huge in mpeg2? Is it just that the audio is uncompressed? (This particular "video" is actually a slide show of pictures, just fyi.)
     
  5. Yuriv

    Yuriv Regular member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2003
    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    When you convert the file from AVI to MPEG2, you are re-encoding it. The size of the resulting MPEG2 file has no relation to the original except for the file length.
    Rather, the size of the re-encoded MPEG2 file is dictated by the bitrate that is used by the re-encoding program.
    Now the decompressed audio is a factor here, since a 30 min wav file can be about 500MB in size. For this reason, it is best to use AC3 (dolby digital) when converting to DVD, especially as using AC3 greatly increases the compatibility with standalone players. Depending on the bitrate, a 30min AC3 file can be anywhere from 60MB and up.
    The primary factor in your case, however, is the video bitrate. As I said above, the lower the bitrate (the amount of bits allocated to each second of video) the smaller the resulting file.
    I have never heard of WinMPG, but in TMPGEnc Plus the project wizard allows you to adjust your bitrate on the final setup screen, and tells you exactly what size the resulting file will be. Alternatively, you can set your destination media to DVD-R, and tell the program what percentage of the disc you want the file to fill.
    I recommend you give TMPGEnc Plus a try, as the wizard is very straight forward, and you will know exactly what you are getting. The program has a 30-day trial that should be enought time to let you know whether you like it or not. This is one of the most widely used and highly praised encoding applications available, I don't think you will regret it (and I am not affiliated with it in any way).
     
  6. crysania

    crysania Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Thanks, I found TMPGEnc much more useful!
    I created my first successful DVD of an avi file I encoded from an Adobe Premiere slideshow and re-encoded in TMPEGEnc! But I haven't had any luck yet with my captured home videos.... More on that in another thread! Thanks for your help.
     

Share This Page