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Correct way to test PS2 Fuses?

Discussion in 'PS2 - Hardware boot discussion' started by DiscipleX, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. DiscipleX

    DiscipleX Member

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    I just signed up with afterdawn and I was in hurry to get this question answered... so I did not search to forums for a similar subject yet.

    My slim PS2 Does not power on anymore. I plugged the AC adapter in and the red light does not even show up. This happened when I was trying to add a fan mod to the same power source as the slim embedded PS2 fan. Shortly after installing the fan, I was plugging in the small power/reset ribbon cable into the ps2 main switch and I forgot that I still had the unit plugged in. I heard that a powerless slim PS2 can be a fuse related issue, so I found a picture diagram that showed the location of all slim PS2 fuses. I tested the fuses with a volt-meter, they seemed fine. I then thought that maybe you are supposed to de-solder the fuses from the board to test them, as them being connected to the board may cause the volt-meter to read inaccurately. Should I desolder the fuses to test them?
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2006
  2. dan168

    dan168 Regular member

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    no point desoldering the fuses - they are either live or they are not, desoldering them wouldn't make a difference, unless there's another connection that connects the two ends of the fuse together, in which case the fuse is pretty useless in the first place
     
  3. aaur4

    aaur4 Regular member

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    where did you get the diagram? and how are the readings supposed to be?
     
  4. dan168

    dan168 Regular member

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    Try a search in google: http://www.cyber-mag.com/station/fuses/

    Don't quite understand your question... you mean the resistance? Or just whether the fuses are alive or not? It's the same as how you test a normal fuse if that's what you are trying to ask?
     
  5. aaur4

    aaur4 Regular member

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    yea im not sure whether im supposed to measure current, resistance or voltage to check whether its working, and how i should go about measuring each fuse.

    also, the link you gave does not have v14, though i think they might probably be similar.
     
  6. DiscipleX

    DiscipleX Member

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    Alright, sorry it took me so long to reply. I did test the fuses while they were on the board using the reistance option on the volt-meter. When I touched both points of the fuses with the volt-meter, It would report back that the fuses still had continuity, as well as a little bit of reistance. I was just worried that a reverse connection was part of the equation, as the fuses still being connected to the board may cause the volt-meter to read other random connections on the slim ps2 mainboard. So far, with the fuses soldered on, all the fuses seem ok, but I still have no power whatsoever going to my PS2 switch/reset button (no red light).

    Also, the thread above provided by Dan168 seems to list more fuse locations that I have not tried. The diagram that I had highlighted the fuse locations in Green, but I can not seem to find the link to it anymore.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2006
  7. Q4i

    Q4i Guest

    There are specific fuses for the eject/reset buttons. There should also be one in the power supply unit, that one should be checked also. Plugging the switch ribbon in while the unit is powered up shouldn't cause a problem in itself, perhaps the ribbon is installed incorrectly.
     
  8. waleedwc

    waleedwc Regular member

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    You have a slimline ps2, so you will have to crank open the ac adaptor, and see if there is a fuse in there, if there is, you will have to test it, and have you removed the fan that you installed yourself?
     
  9. DiscipleX

    DiscipleX Member

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    Alright, i broke open the slim ps2 ac adapter, but i am not seeing a single "obvious" fuse in there. I unplugged my fan mod as well. Aside from that, the ribbon cable is plugged in correctly. It is most likely not a bad reset/power button fuse, as I have the old one and a brand-new one. Neither work, so i hope richspsxparts.com did not sell me a bad part.

    Now, i did test the PSU output before opening it. The volt-meter said that the output was 8.35ish, where as the PSU unit specifically says 8.5 output on the sticker. I figure that no PSU rates 100% according to specification, but maybe the smaller voltage has something to do with my problem?
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2006
  10. waleedwc

    waleedwc Regular member

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    It must be your AC Adapter then, because i have a few slimlines, and around 3 spare adapters lying around and they all read 8.80V. You are right that the rating is not 100% accurate, but the voltage that you are getting from the adapter should either be exactly 8.5 or slightly above, and anything more then 0.1 lower, can cause the system to not power, use computers for example, if the PSU voltage gets 0.1 low, then the system hooks up, its the same with the ps2, get another AC Adapter and see what happens.
     
  11. DiscipleX

    DiscipleX Member

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    I am sorry, I quoted the AC adapter reading from memory (bad memory). I was wrong to state that the reading was 8.3ish, it is actually reading 8.75 after re-testing it. However, the AC adapter is one of the models that are mentioned in the sony recall. Still, I feel that if the unit is getting 8.75 volts, then why is it still not able to power on? I notice that as soon as I plug the AC adapter into the back of the unit, I can hear a brief "whistley" hum for about 2 seconds. Almost sounds like it is trying to draw power, but cant. The solder points for the AC adapter connection look fine, so it does not seem to be a lost connection.
     
  12. waleedwc

    waleedwc Regular member

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    Ok, the next thing you should do, is open up your ps2, plug the as adapter in, and use your multimeter at the socket solder points to see how much voltage is getting to the ps2, you must do this while the ac adapter is connected, and be careful not to bridge anything.
     
  13. DiscipleX

    DiscipleX Member

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    Alright, will do. The volt-meter I use is at work, so I will have to snag it when I get the chance to. I will again post my results once I obtain the volt-meter and re-rest the unit.
     
  14. DiscipleX

    DiscipleX Member

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    Alright, I just tested the 2 + - points near the 6.3a fuse with the power adapter plugged in. I got 8.74 volts. The fuse itself had no voltage going through it though. I am guessing that means the fuse is blown. If this is the case, where do I get such a small fuse? Do they make large 6.3a amp fuses? if so, I could just rout wires out of the back of the unit for a standard fuse replacement? I tested the continuity of the fuse while the unit was off, and the voltmeter reported something, but I have a feeling it is reporting other connections and not the fuse.

    I just found out that you are supposed to touch one of the points with the positive connector, and then use the board common ground. When I did that, I got 8.74 volts like I should've from the fuse. Obviously I am new to actual electronic diagnosis. What other compnents on the board work with power supply regulation?

    The components near the front of the board where the power/reset button plugs in seem ok, but the actual power button itself does not seem to be drawing any power, both power/reset switches that i have here for that matter
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2006
  15. waleedwc

    waleedwc Regular member

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    Ok, just make sure that you are testing the fuse correctly, to test any fuse just put your multi-meter on the diode setting, and touch one terminal of the fuse with one lead, and the other terminal with the other. When on the diode setting, the display normally reads: 1, then when you connect the leads to both ends of the fuse, the reading should change.
     
  16. DiscipleX

    DiscipleX Member

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    Ok, tested the main power fuse near the ac adapter connection using the Diode setting. When on the diode setting, my VM reads "0.L," and when i touch both terminals, I get a reading of 00.00. However, when I touch the positive lead to the either fuse terminal, and then the ground lead to the common ground on the ps2 board, I get a reading of 1.xxx (not actually xxx's, just used that as a reference to say that I got varying numbers after 1, such as 1.437-1.5xx, etc). This was while the power adapter was plugged in. What now?
     
  17. lilg_06

    lilg_06 Regular member

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    I want you to test the voltage coming through the ac adapter when its plugged into the ps2.
     
  18. DiscipleX

    DiscipleX Member

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    As stated earlier, that was one of the first things I did. I get 8.74-8.75ish. The AC adaptor seems ok. I am starting to be convinced that it is something on the actual PS2 mainboard. I also tested the solder points that hold the ac adapter connector in, 8.74-8.75ish then as well.

    On another note, there seems to be a lot of resin (or is that rosin?) covering the back areas of the board. My original Playstation (as in the PSX) had a lot of this on it as well, but it never seemed to bother anything. I do beleive that resin/rosin leaks all over the board are a clear sign of something getting hot, however.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2006
  19. lilg_06

    lilg_06 Regular member

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    Yes, it normally is due to heat. You probably have a fried motherboard. You say that you can hear a whistling sound when you connect the ac adapter, does that come from the system itself?
     
  20. DiscipleX

    DiscipleX Member

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    the sound is made at the rear corner where the adapter plugs into the system, but this sound is very faint, not even audible if other backround noises are going such as a computer or a TV, or your ear needs to be right up to it.
     

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