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home built project

Discussion in 'All other topics' started by rtrg, May 26, 2018.

  1. rtrg

    rtrg Regular member

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    I built a open reel tape deck transport for NAB tape reels using parts from other decks as well as new parts. I would like to post details as to how I built it but I have no idea of where, either here or another forum. Any ideas welcome.
     
  2. aldan

    aldan Active member

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    unless anyone else has a better idea,this sounds like as good a place as any to post this.
     
  3. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    Just post it here, because I can't think of a better forum. I realize it's been a couple of months since your post but I hope you do drop in and share your experience with us. I'm still using an on old Akai 4000DS MKII.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2018
  4. aldan

    aldan Active member

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    yeah,times a wastin.post the details man.
     
  5. rtrg

    rtrg Regular member

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    thanks for your interest. I used the following parts from various decks. A pair of OTARI mx5050 reel motors, a TEAC capstan motor, flywheel, capstan, and belt, AKAI tape tension arms, 24 volt dc power supply, 110/50 transformer, 4 4pdt relays and sockets, 6 dpdt latching switches, roller solenoid with a 110 volt coil and a full wave bridge rectifier attached. All built on a aluminum plate 16x12x.250 thick. Various hand and power tools of course. Took a number of weeks. Next is to find a TEAC deck to use for the preamp. To do this the entire deck needs to be disassembled down to the harness. The three motors are discarded. EVERYTHING else is used as connected, Switches, harness,resistor network, any pcb's, solenoids, and preamp. All these parts are enclosed in a "box/chassis" which is attached to the preamp creating a larger self contained unit. The heads are mounted on the transport. The unit is attached to the transport at the front. If done correctly the unit is similar to the TEAC A7010 in overall design minus the interconnecting cables. Take your time and check things twice. The wiring is fairly easy and there are many common connections at the relays. Both 110 line 1 and 2, 50 volt AC from the transformer, and the 24 volt DC power supply. Teac reel motors can be used subbing a 12 volt supply for the 24. This is not a project for the faint hearted. A drill press would make things easier. PS--- Create sketches and a wiring diagram. The relays are 110AC coiles. All 4 coiles are common to L1 and are controled from the 4 function switches which in turn are common to L2. Both the "wiper" and "NO" contacts have a combination of 110 and 50 volt connections. The reel motor caps have a combination of both 110(1) and 50(2) connections coming from the "NO" contacts. The "NC" contacts are NOT used. The roller solenoid is 110 dc with a simple full wave rectifier soldered to it. Eliminates a second power supply. Good luck!
     
  6. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    @RTG

    So what are you going to use the end result for? Which deck did you pull the heads from? If you're not already looking there are loads of legacy products that you can grab on Ebay little if you keep an eye, but for the most part they ask far too much for non working units. I've assembled a completely retro stereo system because in my view they're better sounding than all the modern stuff. Yes there's a bit of thermal hiss but it's mostly inaudible so keep us apprised. Take some photos and post so that others can see what you're doing. Thanks for the info!
     

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