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Port forwarding noob in need of help

Discussion in 'Windows - P2P software' started by chevman, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. chevman

    chevman Member

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    Ok so I have watched a million port forwarding videos and I cannot for the life of me port forward on our downstiars computer that runs on wifi. I have the program simple port forwarding but nothing works except when I hook up the pc to the router. I have a d-link wbr 1310 v4 router and it seems odd that only when directly plugged into the router does port forwarding.
     
  2. Deadrum33

    Deadrum33 Active member

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    Did you only FORWARD the port or did you ROUTE that port traffic to a specific machine?
    Did you allow TCP and UDP traffic on that port in Windows firewall?
     
  3. Mez

    Mez Active member

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    1)At one time I saw a big advantage to port forwarding. The robot things that block you port couldn't touch your port up to a year ago (at least on my computer). Then I started getting blocked even with my port forwarded. So it isn't all it used to be.

    If you are still interested, go back a year or 2 in this forum when forwarding was real helpful. There will be lots of great info, much better than videos.

    The biggest problem is your technology is much older than theirs and the hunter prey ratios have changed greatly.

    A brief history of blocking as I remember it.
    4 yrs ago there was no blocking
    3.5 yrs ago a few ISPs started to block but your could reset your router and the problem cleared. The ISPs started buying Sandvines a system that monitored and logged all flows. Later was used to block ports then later throttled as band with shaping.
    3 yrs ago ISPs figured out how to throttle you and robot apps started to appear that would block your port. Throttling can't be gotten around. Spy apps that hunt the torrent networks and harvested your total upload and down load stats became a problem. Those in the know started blocking the intruders. The apps probably made their debut 6 months before but no one was the wiser about them.
    For the next 2 yrs large sums of money were pumper into anti - P2P. 3 yrs ago you might get 10 blocked attacks in 24 hrs on a busy day. A yr later you might get more than 1 ping every second.
    About 1.5 years ago the attacks and pinging got so intense, people started to leave Torrents. Then, instead of relaxing, they pushed more money into the effort because they realized they finally had torrent users on the run. As users leave that arena the anti-P2P have more time to beat on who is left. I have had my blocker 'killed' by he robots on several occasions. You check your computer in the morning and you see that the blocker had died so all the robots were able to come in and inventory my computer. I usually didn't get pings for weeks after that.
    1 year ago my port was getting blocked with it forwarded. It would unblock on its own. I am guessing the robots just sent massive amounts of packets at my port disrupting it.

    The latest anti-P2P tactic is agents for a client check for torrents that will allow you to down load something on their list. They log all the IPs that gave them data. Later that information is given to the legal team which will allow you to settle out of court for a grand or 2. If not they will take you to court and sue you for a huge sum of money. It takes about a year from when you downloaded the torrent till you get the letter. I expect millions to be sued this year. I dropped out of the game, quitting while I was ahead. They were working on games them movies but I bet they are protecting music as well by now. Probably only new releases. They have only been going after new releases but that will change because there is huge money to be made! That will quickly become the business to be in.
     
  4. mrpete

    mrpete Member

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    When other p2p clients cannot initiate a connection to you then you are said to be firewalled. You can "start a conversation" with other p2p users who are NOT firewalled, but you cannot talk at all to p2p users who are firewalled (like yourself). Two firewalled p2p users simply cannot talk to each other (unless they are both using uTorrent 2.2 ... more on that later).

    Something like 50% of all p2p users are firewalled. BUMMER! (for everybody)

    So, you're firewalled and you want to correct the situation, eh?

    Probably the best way to remedy the problem is to go to portforward.com and follow the instructions there. On the main page you will pick out (click on) your router model. Get that router model # and have it handy.

    Next they will show an advertising page (hey, they gotta make a living). Click on "Click here to skip this advertisement" in the upper right corner of the screen.

    On the next page you click on the p2p program that you are using. For example ... BitComet, Vuze, whatever.

    After that you will get a page of instructions. Follow the directions.

    I just looked at the page for BitTorrent on a Linksys WRT54G router. I was very surprised to see that they had left out the firewall instructions. So ...

    When you get to the bottom of the page of instructions on portforward.com they tell you to test to see if you can get incoming connections (with their "Port Checker tool"). Well, at that point, right before the test you should open a new browser tab and do a google search for the name of your firewall and [open port]. For example ...

    windows firewall open port
    zonealarm open port
    comodo open port

    The results that come back from such a search will show you how to open your p2p port(s) in your firewall ... that means to let the connections come in.

    OK. Now that you have done the firewall bit return to the test at the bottom of the page on portforward.com .

    Do the test that they (portforward) tells you to do. The test should be a success.

    If the test is not a success then another option is to use the p2p client program uTorrent version 2.2 ... why should I do that you ask? Well ...

    #1 - anyone using that client (and version [or later]) can connect to anyone using uT 2.2 - nobody is firewalled if both people have uT 2.2
    #2 - uTorrent is the most popular torrent client

    In terms of network connectivity uTorrent 2.2 is THE MOST ADVANCED p2p client. It does not have all the features/bells/whistles that some other p2p programs have, but it will get you un-firewalled much of the time. Un-firewalled = better/faster downloading AND uploading ... everyone benefits.

    You can use any p2p client that you want, but if you are firewalled you are like a fish 1/2 out of water. You can manage to get some things done, but not very well.

    YOU'RE NOT GOING TO JUST SIT THERE AND CONTINUE TO BE FIREWALLED, ARE YOU?

    Do something about it!!!
     
  5. mrpete

    mrpete Member

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    Deadrum33 has it exactly right. Those are the exact things you want to do to get un-firewalled.

    As for what Mez said ... I guess he must be primarily downloading/uploading stuff that the MPAA / RIAA / BREIN / etc. are actively combating.

    I guess I must be downloading "unpopular" stuff, but I haven't generally run into the types of packet storms that Mez has described. YMMV.
     
  6. Mez

    Mez Active member

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    mrpete I had been on their naughty list for a very long time. I started before the anti p2p movement. In the good old days you could down load massive amounts of material. You could average 750 kb over 24 hrs every day if you had enough to down load. I down loaded more my first year than all the next 4 years combined. The next year I was cut in half then each yr after that I only could do 25% of the previous year. Still that was fine since I could still down load all I wanted. I rarely did movies so finding music I liked and didn't have was hard.

    I concur, utorrent is the best client out there.
     
  7. Deadrum33

    Deadrum33 Active member

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    Port forwarding isnt really meant to hide your traffic from the ISP, the traffic is on their network no matter the port, they know how much bandwidth you use and where the traffic comes from.
    Port forwarding is even MORE important now than 3-4 years ago due to many people ugprading to and past Windows XP SP2, the first Windows with built in firewall. Then the laptop boom, everyone has a wireless router in their house. A router itself is a hardware firewall of sorts because you don't receive traffic that isnt asked for. If you add software + hardware firewalls together, that could be a combination that novices might need a guide for.
     
  8. mrpete

    mrpete Member

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    This is a slight tweak to what I said above about firewalled/un-firewalled.

    If you use uTorrent 2.x you will be un-firewalled much of the time.

    However, if you surf to any of the many web sites on the net (or use the portforward.com program PFPortChecker.exe) that will test whether you are firewalled you will likely be told that you are firewalled. From the point of view of the web site you ARE firewalled.

    It will only be from the point of view of other uTorrent 2.x users that you will be un-firewalled. That is because there is a "NAT traversal" mechanism built into the most recent versions of uTorrent.

    Besides the normal internet protocols (TCP,IP) uTorrent 2.x also "speaks" a new protocol called uTP that will get you un-firewalled when talking to other people/peers who are using uTorrent 2.x (a recent version). uTorrent typically is the most popular torrent client. There are many other good torrent clients.

    http://www.utorrent.com/documentation/utp

    ---

    About decreases in download ability ...

    I haven't experienced any periods where I could only download 25% of what I had downloaded the month/etc. before. Keep in mind that I typically download "unpopular"/obscure stuff, so I may be "falling through the cracks."
     
  9. mrpete

    mrpete Member

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    Hello chevman! You still out there?

    I went to simpleportforwarding.com and looked around. I couldn't find a PDF user manual or even a CHM file in their zip archive download. What the program does is [1] configure your router via http and [2] (I believe) help you to configure your Windows firewall. The change log for the program says one of the changes was "Added new item under the Advanced menu, 'Open Windows Firewall.'" [[1 HOUR LATER]] Now I see that the main difference between the free and "Pro" version of the simpleportforwarding program is that the so called "Pro" version [1] "Easily Add/Remove/View The Ports You Have Forwarded To The Windows Built-in Firewall" and [2] "Quick Access to the Windows Firewall with 1 click."

    Without integrated updating of the firewall the program will only do 1/2 of the job. That could be the situation you are in. On the other hand I think it is more likely that DHCP is messing up your port forwarding.

    To use the simpleportforwarding program to do the whole job you must pay $12.95 for the so called "Pro" version (which is merely adequate). The free version is inadequate / does only 1/2 of the job. I will give the program this ... the free version does the more difficult 1/2 of the job.

    I looked at the user manual for the WBR-1310. I only looked over the manual for a short time, but it appears that the router is generally pretty normal.

    BTW - The simpleportforwarding program has a forum at ...
    http://forums.pcwintech.com/index.php/board,4.0.html

    OK ... back to us ... here ...

    From what you said I believe that you are trying to do port forwarding on a router that normally has multiple computers connected to it. This can be a tricky setup. DHCP can screw things up for you in this sort of situation. Also, if you are trying to do port forwarding to two different computers from the same router then that also needs special configuration.

    How are you handling IP address assignments? If you do things the "normal"/default way DHCP from within the router will assign an IP address (local to your home = 192.168.0.#) to each computer as each computer boots up. This sort of arrangement can make port forwarding not work. Instead configure the machines that will be doing P2P to have static (local) IP addresses. The "outside" address that your router gets assigned by the ISP will still be dynamic and will be assigned by the ISP's DHCP process.

    On the "basement" computer (while it is in the basement and connected by wifi) do the following ...

    Check that you can surf the net or that ping returns replies from internet domains (ping google.com). If all is well proceed to the steps below. If (for some reason) you cannot access the internet then correct the situation before proceeding.

    The simpleportforwarding program has a "tool to set your IP to static or back to DHCP." If you have already set your "basement" computer to have a static (local) IP address then skip down to the "Now we want to change the ports" section.

    If you have not yet set up a static (local) IP address for the "basement" computer then do so by using the instructions below. Do not use the simpleportforwarding program to do it. That program will not know that you also need a static (local) IP for your "upstairs" computer.

    If the instructions below for setting up a static IP don't work for you then surf to the web page below and select your OS. You will get good instructions with nice images.

    http://portforward.com/networking/staticip.htm

    Stop any programs that may be running.

    Open a DOS window and enter the command "ipconfig /all" (no quotes). One or two of the lines returned will be DNS servers. Write down the address(es) or copy them to notepad/etc.

    Open Control Panel -> Network -> Local Area Connection -> Properties (right-click option -OR- button) -> highlight (click on) Internet Protocol -> Properties (button)

    When you click on that last properties button a dialog box appears that lists:
    IP address
    Subnet mask
    Default gateway
    Preferred DNS server(s)

    Actually entering the #.#.#.# numbers below into the dialog box is a bit different than you might think. You do not actually type "." (period). Each of the above properties has four fields to the right of it. It looks like it is 1 field, but it is actually 4 fields. You can hit the Tab key to go to the next field. If you enter 3 digits (192) you will automatically move to the next field.

    Click on "Use the following IP address."

    Set IP address to 192.168.0.200 .
    Set subnet mask to 255.255.255.0 .
    Set default gateway to 192.168.0.1 .

    Click on "Use the following DNS server addresses:".

    Set preferred DNS server(s) to the address(es) that came from the ipconfig command.

    Click on the OK button and then on the OK button in the previous dialog box. In general close all the dialog boxes, etc.

    Reboot the computer. You probably do not need to do this, but let's be safe.

    OK, the computer is up and you have logged in. Check that you can surf the net or that ping returns replies from internet domains (ping google.com). If all is well proceed to the steps below. If (for some reason) you cannot access the internet then undo the IP changes made above (re-select the two automatic options [IP address/DNS address]) and then reboot. Post what happened on afterdawn.

    OK, the computer is up and you have logged in and you can access the net with your new static (local) IP address of 192.168.0.200 .

    [[Now we want to change the ports.]]

    Now we want to change the ports that your torrent client/program uses. I do not know what torrent client/program you are using so I am going to give very general instructions.

    If you are using two different torrent clients on your two computers AND the clients use different ports then you do not need to change your ports. Ignore the next paragraph and leave your ports as they are.

    Configure your torrent client to use different port(s) than it did previously. Either add 1000 or subtract 1000 from all port numbers. Write down the new port number(s) or copy them to notepad/etc. Exit the torrent client/program.

    Now run the simpleportforwarding program and let it configure the router (open the port and forward to your new IP). Somewhere in here the router will likely reboot. Because of that I suggest waiting for 1 minute after you exit the simpleportforwarding program.

    If that friggin' simpleportforwarding program just looks up in its database what port your torrent client uses and does not take into account the port changes you just made then it is not a very good program. If that is the case and you want to continue using that program you will need to use different torrent clients on your upstairs/downstairs system and you must use the normal ports for each of those clients.

    If you have the "Pro" (adequate) version of the simpleportforwarding program use it to modify your firewall to open the port(s) that your torrent client uses. If not then you must configure your firewall now ... open the firewall port(s) manually now. I would give you more detailed instructions, but I do now know what firewall you are using.

    If you have no idea how to open the ports in the firewall then do a Google search for the terms below. Type your firewall name and then [open port].

    windows open port
    zonealarm open port
    comodo open port

    If, like many people, you have the Windows firewall and no other firewall then the links below will help you open the necessary port(s) in your Windows firewall.

    - - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Huubpawy38 (sound=low / turn up volume!)

    - - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJCehTa1R7U (this Win7 vid is silent)

    - - http://maximumpcguides.com/windows-7/open-a-port-in-windows-7s-firewall/

    - - http://www.proposedsolution.com/howto/open-port-windows-7-firewall/

    - - http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-manually-add-a-port-exception-to-the-window.html

    Open the firewall port(s) manually now.

    Start the torrent client/program. Hopefully now the "basement" computer is now un-firewalled.

    I assume you have an "upstairs" computer that also does P2P and probably uses the same torrent client as on the "basement" computer.

    Repeat all of the steps above on the "upstairs" computer EXCEPT MAKE THESE CHANGES:

    - change the IP address to 192.168.0.201 instead of 192.168.0.200

    - use different port(s) in the torrent client ... if you subtracted 1000 then add 1000, etc.

    - about subtract/add - the main thing is to change the port(s) to different number(s) than are used on the other computer

    If you are still having problems then ...

    Post on afterdawn and let us know what your ISP is (this affects the DNS settings).

    Please also let us know (on both P2P computers):
    - What is the OS?
    - What program(s) are you using as your torrent client(s)?
    - What ports are the torrent clients set to use?
    - what are you doing about your firewall
    ---If your OS is Win XP/Vista/7 then do use Windows firewall or disable it?
    ---Do you use another firewall?
    ---What is the anti-virus (the full name "on the box")? Sometimes AV comes with a firewall.
    - What are the brands of the 2 computers? (just so we will have names to refer to them by in future posts)
     
  10. chevman

    chevman Member

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    i have opened my port 25565 for minecraft earlier before this thread was posted but it works just when i have an ethernet cable not on wifi.........k so i went to my firewall yesterday and i just went to my advanced firewall and created anti-blocks so to speak in my firewall and now im on wifi and its comin in clear as day...now i just gotta fix my minecraft so it works
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
  11. mrpete

    mrpete Member

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    Below is what I believe likely happened. I certainly could be wrong.

    The basement computer was brought upstairs. It was assigned the IP 192.168.0.2 by the DHCP in the router when you plugged in the cat5 cable from the basement computer and booted the OS. You forwarded port 25565 to IP 192.168.0.2 and opened up port 25565 in the firewall of the basement computer. Minecraft played just fine and was un-firewalled.

    You carried the basement computer back down to the basement.

    While you were doing that someone booted up the upstairs computer or connected via wifi and got assigned the IP 192.168.0.2 by the DHCP in the router. Or maybe the router just "hung on" to the IP address 192.168.0.2 because its DHCP lease had not yet expired.

    You then booted the basement computer and via wifi it was assigned the IP 192.168.0.3 by the DHCP in the router. You tried to play Minecraft but the program was firewalled.

    My prior post is still applicable and could be a way to fix your problem of being firewalled ... simply jigger around the instructions provided based on the info you gave and also add some common sense.

    If the problem is unrelated to port forwarding to a DHCP IP address then I'm stumped. Good luck and adios!
     
  12. chevman

    chevman Member

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    k i will tell you what happened.

    -I have a 50ft cat5e ethernet cable
    -i took it ran it up the stairs plugged it into the router (d-link wbr 1310)
    -then did my port forwarding
    -it worked
    -i unplugged my ethernet and plugged in my wifi and it didnt work
    -so i finally, thanks to this thread, went to my advanced firewall in vista and put mc as an exception
    -it now works on wifi :D
     

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