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Question Questions DVD disc media

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by gamer1987, Jun 18, 2020.

  1. gamer1987

    gamer1987 Member

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    oxidizing agents present in the air, such as muriatic acid vapor and sodium hypochlorite 2,5% vapor, enter the DVD mdisc and start corrosion of the metal layer and the dye and the inner layers ang glue?
     
  2. wither 1

    wither 1 Member

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    In my opinion, I doubt they're present in air at a concentration high enough to ruin the discs unless you're in a country which has no air quality controls and you live next to a plant that produces those or you're storing them in the laundry room with a bleach bottle open (sodium hypochlorite).
     
  3. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    I know this is an old thread, but it's a worthy discussion that's worth restarting. I'm finding quite a few of my CD's and DVD (originals) are starting to experience disc rot. I've started ripping them and storing them on newer discs which should give them a few more years but they too in time will go bad. I have a number of home movies which I've uploaded to a cloud drive until I'm able to get them burned to M-Discs. It does seem that our old mantra of backing things up makes more sense now than ever.
     
  4. wither 1

    wither 1 Member

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    Out of curiosity, what is disc rot? Are you saying they're no longer playable?

    I'm not disagreeing with you or your plan. I haven't experienced the problem yet but maybe, given time.............
     
  5. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    Disc rot is when the aluminum reflective surface, the inside of the decorated portion of a CD, begins to deteriorate, oxidize. At it's early stages there might only be pinhole damage. I have some CDs that had several small pinholes in them. Check a few of your older discs. In a dimly lit room take a disc and shine a bright flashlight against the printed side while looking at it from the opposite side or lens side of the disc. If you see little pinholes of light coming through then it is either unreadable or will over time become unreadable. My standalone CD and DVD player couldn't read some of my discs, but I was able to successfully rip them with my PC BD-R drive, possibly because a system has better error correction or the rom has better lasers but I managed to recover them. Some of my older CDs going back more than 30 years are completely gone. For now I'm ripping them uncompressed and burning them as data discs to DVD media. I purchased a new BD-R rom which is optimized for burning M-Discs which can hold a good 30 CDs. M-discs are supposed to be able to last for up to a 1000 years.
     
  6. gamer1987

    gamer1987 Member

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    DVD MDisc is reliable?
    I burned files on the DVD and those files were on an HDD with some badblocks, those files were corrupted?
     
  7. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    I would research it to make certain you have the equipment and software to burn. I'm still in the learning stage so more later. Some newer BD burners are M-Disc rated as M-Disc capable, which could be hype. I just recently purchased a new LG OEM BD Burner and it is M-Disc rated. I will post more once I start burning.
     
  8. wither 1

    wither 1 Member

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    Have you tried to play the media files that you ripped from damaged discs and transferred to data discs?
     
  9. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    Yes I ripped them to wav files, and they play just fine, which means I can burn identical copies. On more than one I counted multiple small pinholes, and sadly there are a few that are unrecoverable, short of pirating them. I'm only going to use M-Discs for important family videos and photos. Then all I have to do is keep checking them over the next 1000 years to see how well they work. :)
     
  10. wither 1

    wither 1 Member

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    Nero has a feature called Rescue Agent which is intended to recover files from discs which are damaged, such as by scratches. Unfortunately, you have to buy a suite to get it and I don't know if it would work on the unrecoverable discs with pinholes.

    I'll check back with you in a couple hundred years. :)
     
  11. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    Scratched discs occur on the lens side and can be repaired, it's the printed side that's the problem. Once the data is gone the disc become useless. There is a degree of error correction for optical discs which is probably why I'm able to recover a fair share of the damaged discs. I know have a BD-R that's M-disc rated so all I have to do is order the 25GB discs and try and burn a few, and then watch my blood pressure rise for each coaster.
     

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