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Removing Labels From DVDR's & CD-R's

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by manestle, Nov 30, 2004.

  1. perealb

    perealb Member

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    Last night I went to BestBuy and got a 25-pack of Fuji printable DVD-R 8X. I've made a backup of Need for Speed Underground 2. I didn't have too much time to play with the copy but it worked fine. I noticed a slight delay at the beginning of loading but after that everything seemed OK.

    I am going to order the Taiyo Yuden DVDs. I've read you should get the ones made in Singapore. Does anyone know where to get them?
     
  2. yellows

    yellows Member

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    You can use Rosinol Lighter fluid. The same fluid used to refill zippo lighters. You can actually use the lighter fluid to clean the written surface of the disc without damaging it.
     
  3. gorec9897

    gorec9897 Regular member

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    Ouch, lighter fluid is way too strong of a solvent to get the job done. If you want to clean sharpie off the disk just use a little 70% isopyl alcohol on a kleenex, it works just as good.
     
  4. manestle

    manestle Member

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    I'm talking about removing sticky labels. I do use 70% Isopyl alcohol which remomes markers very well and is safe. I just haven't found an easy way to remove labels. I have a few DVD's that I can't get the originals that I made copies from. I have read errors with these labeled DVDR's and I know from experience that if I were to remove the labels everything would be fine. I've done this a few times. I no longer label DVDR's or even CDR's. Had a friend that had a labeled CDR in his car deck and liked the musicso he left that disc in his unit in the middle of Summer and the label came loose from the heat and we had to tear the whole unit out and open it up to get the disc out. Certainly not worth the headache. Just use a Sharpie marker!
     
  5. catfreak

    catfreak Active member

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     ... As I posted earlier, use Goo Gone ... I've removed about 50 labels this way with a 100% success rate ... (some were removed several years ago and the discs are still great) ...
     
  6. Jerry746

    Jerry746 Senior member

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    Like catfreak said, Goo Gone is the safest way to remove labels. We use it in our stores on appliances, tv's and computer equipment all the time. It will not hurt plastic of any kind. Whoever suggested lighter fluid was not made from oil better check again and WD 40 is ok on metal base sticker removal. Goo Gone is a citrus base product. It may take a little more time to soak in but is the best way to go. Its all up to your own choice.

    Jerry
     
  7. gorec9897

    gorec9897 Regular member

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    The written layer of the disc and the top layer are one in the same; if you use a strong solvent such as lighter fluid you [bold]can[/bold] damage the written layer(data layer).

    [bold]ps:[/bold]
    Goo gone is good' also ;-)
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2005
  8. ddp

    ddp Moderator Staff Member

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    yes as scratch the top of disc, scratch it goodbye as info is on top of disc not bottom
     
  9. Baguito

    Baguito Member

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    I also have been using labels on DVDs for a long time, and I found that paper labels are the worst things to use. If you can, find a label that won't curl when you peel it of before you stick it on the DVD. I have not yet found such paper label, so I'm "sticking" to the clear labels. They will print the same way, but won't curl up like paper dose. I also found that the DVD would curl as well, and the outside edges of the DVD would not play properly. Any ways, that's my experience with paper labels.
     
  10. yellows

    yellows Member

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    Lighter fluid does sound harsh, but it does indeed work and is safe as far as i can tell. I don't let the disc soak in a tub full of it, but I generously squirt it on the disc after I have scraped off most of the label. However, the only lighter fluid I use is Rosinol fluid which is for filling zippos. I even use it on the bottom of the disc to clean off any glue that gets on the bottom during the cleaning process. I have also read these disc in both a DVD player and my DVD writter(ripping it to an .ISO) and it works fine after, considering these same disc would not play or read properly before I took off the label.
     
  11. ddp

    ddp Moderator Staff Member

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    i've used wd40 with no ill effects on discs & computers so each to their own
     
  12. perealb

    perealb Member

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    Alternative to labels.
    I've also had problems with labels and tried to use inkjet printable DVDs writing at 4X. It improved a lot, it was playable with few delays on loading the game. I started to write my backups at 1X and now everything works really well. I tried the cheapest media I got (Princo, max 4X) and the best I have (Fuji, max 16X). All worked perfectly.
     
  13. luke35

    luke35 Member

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    Another take on the label question. I let a buddy borrow a labeled movie, big time playback problems. he put it on a flat surface and the outermost edge was warpped.
    when you apply the label you press down on the spring loaded thing in the middle, the edge of the disc floats till it makes contact with the label. By pressing down the disc is slightly warped, then the you stick the label to this warpped disc and it gets stuck warpped. Remove the label and it lays flat again. I'll never use labels again.
     
  14. manestle

    manestle Member

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    Hes very true about labeling DVDR's. It is a bad practice and I don't care what anyone say's about not having trouble with labeled disc's. I labeled my DVD backups when backing up DVD software first came out. I would have problems with some of the labeled discs as far as trying to make a copy of my copy (read errors all over the place) and even playing back on the same burner drive that created the backup with the same software used to create the original backup. I removed the label (had a heck of a time) and amazingly the disc worked fine. If that's not enough to convince someone not to label their discs than I don't know what will. Believe me, DO NOT LABEL DISCS with sticky labels!!!
     
  15. bcrandco

    bcrandco Member

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    I have the same problems with labels. I wanted to add that I have two dvd drives that have read problems with paper-labelled dvds, but my plextor dvd burner had no problems reading the dvd with labels. I could dedecrypt the dvd from the plextor but not from the others. Not quite sure what that infers.
    As for removing labels, I had luck with lamp oil - which wouldn't be that different from lighter fluid, WD-40, etc - they may be oil based, but suffficiently volatile to leave no residue. "Painted" the label with the fluid, let it sit 5-10 min and it came off beautifully and clean.
    MK
     
  16. hbraun

    hbraun Member

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    i would like to add another point to the problem of labeling CDs/DVDs. When I came across this problem at home with my midia, I asked the people that make CDs (lots of)at the company I work for, if they had this problem and how they solved it (because they have to label the CDs, handwritten is not acceptable).
    The answer was yes, they had problems to read the data, but they said they solved satisfactorily by FIRST applying the label AND THEN burning the CD (they dont burn DVDs yet).

    I have not seen any reference or comment about this "reverse" process, neither have tried myself yet, so I would like to have comments from you folks, the experts of this discussion group.

    Best regards.
     
  17. manestle

    manestle Member

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    Labeling first may solve some of the read problems but will not solve the peeling up effect caused by excessive heat that can be found inside a car during the hot summer months. As far as applying the label first, this may improve the read errors that occurr but if a label is applied a tiny wee bit off center this can cause unstable RPM issues and the end result is back to read errors. I would have to say DO NOT LABEL DISCS. I would like to thank bcrandco for his earlier advice. I wasn't letting the Zippo Lighter Fluid on long enough. I just did a label removal with leaving the fluid on for 5 minutes or so and the label came off very easy but still had a light glue film left over but Alcohol took care of this.
     
  18. vike

    vike Member

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    This is going to sound weird, but when we need to remove tags and labels at work and don't want to damage the surface of the item we use a handheld Vicks steam vaporizer (available at most pharmacies) to soften up the label before we remove it. Works like a champ, and leaves very little residue behind. Also, I NEVER use labels on my backups. You can buy TY printables for about $.70 each and they look and perform better than anything with a label on it. With a good scanner you just scan the original DVD and then print the jpg directly onto the backup.
     
  19. kbuegel

    kbuegel Member

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    In response to the guy who said that labels being a teeny bit off can cause problems- That's completely FALSE! Please test your assumptions before you spout them out.

    I've posted previously that nearly 100% of my DVD's with paper labels became unreadable after a few months (it takes a while for some reason). In attempting to fix the problem, I found that partially removing the label fixes most of the DVD's. So, for instance, you can tear off a chunk of the label, and usually that HELPS it to read more accurately. I've had unplayble DVD's become completely revived by removing half the label vertically (leaving the left half on and the right half removed). This would be the absolute worst-case scenario for an out-of-balance DVD and yet they play just fine. So, to those who claim that DVD balance is to blame, that is completely FALSE! Please, try it yourself. A DVD with half a label plays just fine, and may even play better than a DVD with a full label!

    FYI, I've been stripping my paper labels off just by soaking the DVD in warm water for a few minutes. Then I use a wooden or plastic spatula to scrape off the label. It usually pulls most of the gummy stuff with it, and the wooden spatula won't scratch the DVD itself. For the last bits of glue goo, I picked up some Goo-Be-Gone at the grocery store. Its orange citris based cleaner that seems to disolve the goo pretty well. I find that it can leave a residue behind, so you have to rinse it very thoroughly. I spend about 5 minutes at the sink for each DVD trying to get them clean.

    For a replacement label, I've been using clear plastic labels which I then overprint with white non-liquid ink using an ALPS printer. Then print a full color image over the white background on the clear plastic labels. These plastic labels do not use the same adhesive and don't hold heat the way the paper ones do. After about 6 months of using plastic labels, they seem to be working fine.
    As a finishing touch, lately I've been spraying a clear acrylic finish on the DVD's. This does a great job of sealing the printed surface of the DVD, and gives a semi-gloss surface which looks very professional. I picked up some clear acrylic finish spray at Lowe's. When applying it, I use a paper towel and a jewel case bottom. put the paper towel over the jewel case and stick the dvd onto the center holder of the jewel case. NEVER re-use a paper towel, always use a fresh one. The paper towel will prevent overspray from getting to the readable side of the DVD, and its absorbant enough that it soaks up any spray that builds up near the center hole. I tried using a brush once to paint the DVD with finish, but it was very time-consuming and you still got lots of finish around the center hole. So may as well just spray. So far I've made about 150 DVD's using plastic labels printed with an ALPS printer and sprayed with acryiic finish, and they all work and look great. I've got about another 150 to go to finally replace all my paper-labeled DVD's.

    BTW, I also have an epson R320 printer and printable DVD's, and I use that for most of the new stuff I'm burning. Printable DVD's are sooo nice. Only trouble is sometimes the printing gets screwed up and you have to toss the DVD, but they are cheap enough now that its no biggie. I'm using the Ridata G5's with printable hub area, as well as TDK's from Costco that I picked up for $25 for 50 DVD's, but these have the center hub area unprintable. I switch back and forth depending on whether I want to print down to the hub or not (depends on the image I'm printing).

    If anyone has any questions on any of my labeling techniques, feel free to ask. I spent about a year researching and testing various methods and I'm happy to share my results.
     
  20. rneffle

    rneffle Member

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    My DVD collection is now at 460, and almost all have disk labels on them. These are a little over a year old now, and I have started to experience playback problems on some that have the labels.
    I will not go into the discussion here about being pro or con labels, just that I recently bought a thermal printer to use instead of any labels. I did not want to make a lifelong career out of removing all the DVD labels, so I set out to find the best way to get them off, and then use the thermal printer to re-identify.
    I have tried using a heat gun to warm the label adheasive first, but this was cumbersome and had little effect on the older labels. I tried Goo Gone and this worked very well, but it seemed to take several application of the Goo Gone to get rid of all the label and adheasive. I also tried soaking the disk in soapy water overnight and this allowed the label to come off, but left all the adheasive.
    Yesterday I think I finally found a system that works, quickly, cheaply, and completely. I took a small corningware dish and put in a 50/50 mixture of regular household ammonia and water. I put in the disk to soak for only about 10 minutes, and using an old plastic credit card was able to just push off the old label along with the adheasive. The label came off remarkably easy with absolutely no adheasive left on the disk. I then rinsed the disk completely under running water and dried it with a lint free cloth. The finished disk looks really great, sparkling clean with no leftover adheasive residue anywhere.
     

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