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Removing Labels From DVDR's & CD-R's

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by manestle, Nov 30, 2004.

  1. kbuegel

    kbuegel Member

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    Thats a great tip on removing the labels. I appreciate that because it does take forever to remove the goo on those labels. How did you attain some "household ammonia" ? Did you use windex, or some sort of cleaner you can purchase?
     
  2. rneffle

    rneffle Member

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    The "household ammonia" is just the normal stuff you can buy at any grocery store that is normally used for cleaning kitchens and bathrooms. What I bought at WalMart was called Parsons' Lemon Fresh, and I think cost about $1.50 for 56 Fl. Oz.
     
  3. beefer1

    beefer1 Member

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    I have a theory on why the paper labels seem to take months before they become problematic. The glue they use is hygroscopic, i.e. it absorbs water from the air. I noticed the problems with the labels during the winter when the air is much dryer. So the water that the glue absorbed when I put them on must be evaporating out of the glue causing the glue and the paper to shrink. This would cause the disks to warp a bit. They don't need to warp much for them to become unplayable. Running error tests on these disks always showed much higher error rates towards the outer edge, which is where the warping would be at a maximum. The problems may alleviate somewhat when the ambient humidity increases, but the label may already be permenantly distorted.
    Thanks Pulsar, right you are, bit of a brain fart...
    Anyways, that my theory, I may be blowing smoke so don't crucify me if you don't agree. I'm only using printable disks now, pas de probleme.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2005
  4. pulsar

    pulsar Active member

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    I think the term is "hygroscopic". A bit like brake fluid! Brake fluid would get rid of labels. And knacker your discs too.
     
  5. orbiter5

    orbiter5 Regular member

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    I had some quite large labels on some cd's for many years and recentely decided to rid the disks of them. My choice of chemical was "meths" (methylated spirits.) After picking off much of the label, I soaked the remains of the sticker with the meths, let it soak for a few seconds then rubbed it off the discs surface.

    Being careful is the way with this stuff and I needed to add more meths as I went along as it evaporated really quick. The disc was ok though :)

    I never use lables anymore and would advise a test with a coaster first if your going to try meths on a dvd.
     
  6. rneffle

    rneffle Member

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    A little update on my earlier post regarding label removal using an ammonia solution. After doing label removal for an entire evening, it became apparent this process had some drawbacks. The ammonia solution did work, but it also desolved any color in the label as well as the adheasive in the removal process. After doing a few labels the solution became more and more contaminated with ink and adheasive residue which would then get on the completed disk. Also, I found that some labels took additional soak time to remove, probably due to the different adheasives used with different brands of labels.
    I decided to give Mineral Spirits a try next, and found it was much faster, only four minutes soak time was required and the solution did not contaminate and stayed crystal clear. Label removal required that you start a small piece near the edge with your fingernail, but then after getting it started, the label just peeled right off in one piece, and all adheasive along with it. This left a VERY clean disk surface after rinsing off with water. I suppose I should have processed more disks before declaring the ammonia solution a success, but this evening I have already done over twenty disks using the Mineral Spirits with no problems at all.
     

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