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Windata DVD+R Bad burn on first disc out of package

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by KlawdeK, May 9, 2010.

  1. KlawdeK

    KlawdeK Member

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    I used a Samsung slim external DVD writer TSSTcorp CDDVDW SE-S084C and burned approx 4.2 GB on a 4.65 GB windata disc at 8X. The Windata disc had an obviously fake MID of MCC 004.

    I used Nero essentials 9 which came bundled with the drive. Nero reported a bad file during verification. The data was all flv files. The bad file would play part way through then my viewer (VLC) reported it could no longer read the format.

    I did a Nero disc speed scanDisc and several sectors at the end of disc are bad. Nero wont let me do disc quality. I would post the .png of the scan but I do not have a place to host the file:(
     
  2. JoeRyan

    JoeRyan Active member

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    In a follow-up post you ask "Why is (sic) there so much bad media?" My assumption is that the second post may be related to the experience you describe here, and there are some potential flaws in some of your conclusions drawn here.

    1) You are using an external drive. That involves USB connections, and USB has had some difficulties in the past. When USB 2.0 arrived, computer manufacturers put USB 2.0 ports on the back of the computers and left USB 1.1 on the easy-t0-reach fronts. That caused external drive manufacturers thousands of complaints, particularly for DVD drives. USB 1.1 could not pass video signals fast enough, but the drive manufacturers, not the computer designers, took the heat for bad design. I'm sure your USB is 2.0, but problems with external connections must be considered as a potential source of problems.

    2) In my experience Samsung/Toshiba drives have not offered the best support for the many different kinds of discs on the market. That may have changed in the couple of years I've been away from optical research, but those drives were seldom the leaders in wide, up-to-date firmware support. That is also a consideration.

    3) How do you know that the MID code is "fake"? It could simply be that CMC or MBI, the two manufacturers of Verbatim single layer discs, sold discs to Windata that Mitsubishi/Verbatim rejected as B-grade. If you purchased the discs at an extraordinarily low price, you may have ended up as the quality sorter of questionable discs that the factory did not want to spend money picking through themselves. That is another possibility.

    4) Are the flv files downloaded files with complete integrity? If not, burning them to any disc will create errors that software may read as disc flaws. You would have to eliminate the files themselves as contributing factors in the problem.

    5) Nero "won't let" you do disc quality because that feature is not available in the drive. It is a drive limitation, not a software limitation.

    Recording optical discs is a complex process that may seem simple once you get the hang of it. The complexity is so great that blaming disc quality is often the first reaction but seldom the true cause once one begins deep troubleshooting.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2010
  3. KlawdeK

    KlawdeK Member

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    1) My system is USB 2.0 on all ports according to the specs.

    2) I have heard that samsung is a very tolerant of bad media drive.

    3) I suspect fake media codes becouse there has been some talk of that on this and other boards for instance:

    http://forums.afterdawn.com/thread_view.cfm/763500

    http://www.digitalfaq.com/reviews/dvd-media.htm
    scroll to the bottom the last entry indicates they use fake MIDs

    and if you google windata discs you can come up with others.

    4) My flv files are OK and can play when on the HD.

    5) Yeah I know. If I want to do scans I would have to get a lite-on.
     
  4. JoeRyan

    JoeRyan Active member

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    The MID code tells the drive what power levels and pulse rates to use for a particular medium based on the information in the drive's memory table that is part of the firmware. That information is entered by the engineers who tested multiple versions of discs using that MID code and determined the best compromise of settings for jitter, S/N ratios, and dozens of other test criteria. A fake MID code not only cheats the owner of the real stamper, it also cheats the buyer of the discs because there is little to no relationship between the instructions for the drive and the actual performance of the groove geometry and dye combination. That such discs work at all would be a surprise. I wonder why consumers don't get outraged at that kind of cheating because it hurts them, the owner of the MID code, and the developer who should be getting royalty payments--and fake MID codes are a violation of customs rules in almost all countries. If Windata does use fake IDs, then they ought to go to jail or face enormous fines that put them out of business. (If, however, they buy up B-grade stock and sell it to unsuspecting customers, they should just go out of business.)
     

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