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1080i vs 1080p

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by xodome, Jun 12, 2007.

  1. xodome

    xodome Guest

    I plan on buying a Samsung 32" widescreen HDTV that has a resolution of 1080i. This tv

    Since 1080p is supposedly the true HD should I just spend a little more and buy a 1080p tv or is this tv just fine?
     
  2. cheezzzz

    cheezzzz Regular member

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    For a tv that small you don't need 1080p.
     
  3. xodome

    xodome Guest

    Oh kool thanks
     
  4. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

    There is no such thing as a Samsung LCD that has a resolution of 1080i. It accepts 1080i but its resolution is 1366x768 (or 768p). The 1080p tv has a resolution of 1920x1080. That is almost twice that of the 768p display. At 40" to enjoy 1080p (over 768p) you would have to be sitting less than five feet away.

    -Ceddie Ced
     
  5. shark12er

    shark12er Guest

    spammer removed
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2007
  6. CHDC

    CHDC Member

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    At what size does the switch to 1080p make a difference?
     
  7. cheezzzz

    cheezzzz Regular member

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    I would say 50 or larger plus viewing distance.
     
  8. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

    Yea at 50" and ~5 feet you can really start to see a difference between the formats. I think 60" is a good compromise, but to really see a difference you need a 70"+ screen. At that size everything is as large and life-like as, well, life (or bigger).

    -Ceddie Ced
     
  9. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

  10. CHDC

    CHDC Member

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    Thanks. My friends have been debating the 1080i vs 1080p thing for months. I found a really amazing deal on a 36" 1080p back in January and went with it anyway but more because of the deal and all of the connections it provided. Even if the 1080i would be just as good at that size, I'm really happy with the TV so no complaints!
     
  11. ABMone

    ABMone Guest

    Ok so after reading that article it pretty much says we can only notice 720p at 50in. Right or did I not understand that right.
    But if that's true does that mean you wouldn't be able to tell the difference of say a blu-ray movie on 720p display and a 1080p display? Even though its outputting 1080p?
     
  12. shadester

    shadester Member

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    Yea, I am confused on that as well... I have a 44" RCA DLP (HD44LPW62) and I bought it on impulse for 490 bucks at Target - (was a Display model + 50% off clearance + employee discount lol, retails about $1799 USD I think...)

    One site said it can show 480p, 720p, 1080i AND 1080p, but I dont think that it can show 1080p... It does have a HDMI input though, so when I get my PS3 I will be able to play that in HD... Also I have it set to 1080i for Xbox 360... would it run smoother/better at 720p?

    But also, I did a high def test with JPEGs on a CD through my DVD player, and the 720x480 picture looked better and smoother than the 1280x720... does that make any sense?
     
  13. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

    It depends on the size and the distance you are siting at. That is all the article addresses.

    No you won't see a difference with 720p or 1080p on a 50" screen at 10 feet, but you will on a 70" screen at 10 feet (or a 50" screen at 5 feet, ect...).


    Your tv set's native resolution is 1280x720 progressive (or 720p). It can except many different video signal resolutions (except 1080p) but it only has 1280x720 pixels to work with. Since your TV has to do the work of de-interlacing and scaling the 1080i video signal to 720p anyway you would most likely be better off letting the more powerful Xbox 360 do the required video processing. The 360 has a lot more horse power under the hood than the typical (cheap) HDTV does.

    Ced
     
  14. limelight

    limelight Regular member

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    You want the 1080p.

    1080i displays half the lines of resolution (540) at one time. Its so quick that the human eye doesnt notice it, EXCEPT when the show or movie has fast motion sequences (like a boat flying down the river, fast camera pans, etc). When this happens you'll notice a "tearing" effect on the picture, which looks bad.
    1080p displays ALL lines of resolution all the time, so theres no tearing .
     
  15. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

    To clarify, a 1080i tv set shows as much detail per 1/60th frame as a 1080p does. A 1080i tv set shows two 1/30th fields of 540 odd and then even lines. A quality 1080i CRT will look the same as a quality 1080p Fixed Pixel Display (FPD).

    All current tv technologies are considered FPDs because they have a set amount of pixels to work with at all times. This can give a higher perceived resolution to people watching a FPD compared to a CRT. This is not the case with a state of the art CRT display as the CRT can display richer blacks than any FPD technologies available.

    Ced
     
  16. n8dog8

    n8dog8 Member

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    so just to clarify as long as the viewing distance for a 50in tv is more than 5 feet away you wont be able to really see the difference between 720p and 1080p. But when you are viewing inside of 5 feet for a 50 incher a slight difference will be detected? If this is true what would be the minimum viewing distance for a 40/42 in tv before you could start to see the difference between 720p and 1080p or is 40/42 in so small you wouldn't be able to detect the difference at all?

    Also, if you hook a ps3 up to a 720p set then the 1080p of the ps3 is wasted? the ps3 will then be displayed at 720p?
     
  17. n8dog8

    n8dog8 Member

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    very new at all this hdtv 1080p, 720p stuff. Looking at hdtvs now and just trying to figure out what i want/need for now and future. besides the obvious price difference between 720p and 1080p only ps3 and blu-ray display 1080p as of now? ...right? all other hd channels are displayed in 720p? What is the future of 1080p? when direct tv launches these new hd channels in september what are they going to be displayed in?
     
  18. diabolos

    diabolos Guest


    Max viewing distance to resolve the pixels for a 80" 16:9 tv set

    720p: 27.9

    1080i/p: 10.5


    Max viewing distance to resolve the pixels for a 50" 16:9 tv set

    720p: 17.4ft

    1080i/p: 6.5ft


    Max viewing distance to resolve the pixels for a 40" 16:9 tv set

    720p: 13.9ft

    1080i/p: 5.2ft

    All results of this viewing distance calculator:
    http://www.myhometheater.homestead.com/viewingdistancecalculator.html


    These numbers represent the maximum distance at which you will resolve all the pixels on a tv screen with 20/20 vision. This calculator shows a lot of data. Pay some attention to the THX recommendations as they will show at what size screen and viewing distance producers and directors of movies expect when mastering their products. The SMPTE recommendation is based on the threshold of the human eye.

    But don't forget that your source plays a huge role too. Watching SDTV on a HDTV will look different on every display. Most of the 1080p TV sets over ~$5,000 have good video processing and can make the best out of SDTV (to a reasonable point). The general rule still applies though, the bigger the screen the and the higher the resolution the worse SDTV will be and the farther you will have to sit from the screen, to enjoy it.

    -Ced
     
  19. n8dog8

    n8dog8 Member

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    thanks ced. that helped a lot (i think) so if i were to buy a 40in 1080p tv the farthest away i would want to sit from the tv would be 5.2 feet. Past 5.2 feet, assuming i have hd and am watching a hd channel would be kind of wasting the 1080p resolution? correct?

    And am I correct bout direct tv hd currently being broadcasted in 720p? and only blue-ray and hd dvds being in 1080p?

    thanks again for all help and insight.
    nathan
     

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