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4.7 GB !! but only 4.37Gb ?? (huh)

Discussion in 'Safety valve' started by 97bullock, Apr 12, 2005.

  1. 97bullock

    97bullock Regular member

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    aah,i feel better now.

    what is with dvds that are supposed to be 4.7gb but are really only 4300mb?

    ive had dvd video files before (got one now actually) that wont fit on a dvd because of this problem!

    theres probably a technological explanation to do with compression methods and such that explains why it has to be this way but if there is,i wanna hear it!
     
  2. bilbo65

    bilbo65 Regular member

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    Has only to do with the type of math you are using.
     
  3. djscoop

    djscoop Active member

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    4.7GB unformatted, more like 4.5 formatted. Just like your HDs. You don't get all 80 GBs of and 80 gig HD, do you?
     
  4. squizzle

    squizzle Active member

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    no and I'm only getting about 186 out of my 200. Them lying bastards!
     
  5. djscoop

    djscoop Active member

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    ouch thats bad. I get 152 of my 160, and 111 of my 120s. the bigger they get the more you lose. those bastards!
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2005
  6. Xian

    Xian Regular member

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    Its a scam to inflate their figures - 120 gig sounds better than 112 gig. They measure capacity as 1000 bytes where a kilobyte is actually 1024 bytes when your computer measures it. That 24 byte difference adds up when you start talking gigabytes.
     
  7. baabaa

    baabaa Active member

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    Weren't you always taught to round up rather than round down...............
    The Inland Revenue in the UK are very good at doing this.....

    And they say you get more for your money................LMAO........
     
  8. Auslander

    Auslander Senior member

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    if i ever meet bill gates, i'll be fighting the urge to hug him and beat the shit out of him at the same time. so it'll probably wind up being a very firm handshake.
     
  9. squizzle

    squizzle Active member

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    I feel the same exact way.
     
  10. bbmayo

    bbmayo Active member

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    A lot of people wonder why there 4.7GB discs only write 4.38GB at maximum capacity. There is nothing wrong with your disk, but just and industry standard of calculating gigabytes. To be frank there way is incorrect because it actually takes 1024 bytes to make a full MB, yet the industry uses 1000? Go figure.. [bold]4.7 GB discs = 4.38 GB or 4489 MB for DVD-R and 4483 MB for DVD+R.[/bold]
     
  11. Auslander

    Auslander Senior member

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    squizzle, i think anyone who's had to work with Windows for any period of time will feel pretty much the same.
     
  12. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    @ 97bullock :

    heres a post that was made last year which should help you:
    [bold]Properties of a 4.7 gig disc[/bold]
    cgram7
    Newbie
    29. August 2004 @ 13:26
    Keep in mind that manufacturers quote the capacity of a writable DVD disc in decimal (base 10) rather than binary (base 2) notation so a 4.7 GB disc stores 4.7 billion bytes [4:700,000,000 bytes ÷ 1000 = 4,700,000 KB ÷ 1000 = 4,700 MB ÷ 1000 = 4.7 GB] . Expressed in binary notation (as is typical with CD-R, CD-RW and most operating systems) the same disc has a capacity of roughly 4.38 GB [4:700,000,000 bytes ÷ 1024 = 4,589,844 KB ÷ 1024 = 4,482.27 MB ÷ 1024 = 4.38 GB] .
     
  13. Gnomey

    Gnomey Member

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    Same thing happens with my PSP 256MB Sandisk Pro Duo memory stick... It sazys 256. I can only use about 237. It takes that much away when formatting? I can understand 10<MB but 20 for 1/4 GB? I mean c'mon now...
     
  14. bilbo65

    bilbo65 Regular member

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    Need to understand differences between math in base2 and base10. Read andmerr's post above. Same applies.
     
  15. squizzle

    squizzle Active member

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    Well, 256 ÷ 1024 = .250 ÷ 1024 = .000244. So technically Gnomey's PSP should say 244 MB. Unless it is reserving some space for something and not showing it to you.

    I do understand the math between base2 and base10 perfectly well, I just wish they would use one format or the other and not both. Just a marketing scheme.

    Technically, my 200GB should say 190, not 186.
     
  16. DaOsT

    DaOsT Regular member

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    YEAH the 4.7 gig is japenese which has 1000 meg in a gig

    4.37 is western which has 1024meg in a gig hence the difference
     

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