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Blurry pictures

Discussion in 'Digital photography' started by bishop626, Mar 15, 2007.

  1. bishop626

    bishop626 Member

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    I have a Sony DSC-P100, I've had for some time now and the thing is that I can't keep some of my shots focused. I have adjusted the auto focus, scene selection to sports and just can't seem to get the camera to get some good, quality non-blurry pictures. I have read the manual and it states that you hold the button half way until the camera let's you know that it's focused then press all the way. I do that but it's only good if my subject are still or barely moving. Even if I move my hand while taking a picture and holding the camera will get blurry photos.I took a group shot and someone moved their head to the left, when they moved their head, it was a blurry image while everyone who was still was a clear. Any suggestions?
     
  2. NINVIN21

    NINVIN21 Regular member

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    I have the Canon A530.
    I just wanted to say your not alone my camera does the same thing.
    It's very hard for me to get non blurry action shots.
    The sport setting usually helps alot I don't no All I can really say is try to be in a well lighted area,and hold your camera with 2 hands as steady as you can, Maybe use a tripod.
    I know the blur is due to your subject moving but it will still help a little. I would also mess around with your manual settings set it so the shutter speed is fast,and Just mess around with the settings.

    I'm new to photography I just wanted to say I have the same problem I think the problem is due to us useing Point and Shoot camera's.
    Nice camera by the way I was just looking at the specs
    Good luck.
     
  3. bishop626

    bishop626 Member

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    Yeah, using point and shoot cameras sure do have their limitations. I'm nowhere near a "photographer" but you'd think that the point and shoot cameras would be a no brainer. At least the time I bought mine and now they have these new cameras that seem to have solved those problems. For the price I paid for mine when it first came out I just can't go out and afford another one. Like you said though, I will just have to mess around with the camera and work out the bugs. Thanks for the input.
     
  4. stickweed

    stickweed Regular member

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    I'll give you a tip, whenever you use the zoom instead of being close to the subject of the photo the blur will increase. Therefore either move closer or get a tripod.
     
  5. rjessa

    rjessa Regular member

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    I also purchased a Canon A530, great camera, but similar problem. If you are really interested in getting some fabulous photos I would suggest to upgrade to a Canon SLR Rebel XT. Absolutely amazing pics. I realize its slightly expensive, but prices have dropped since XTi and 30D have been released. Trust me Rebel XT is a better then the other 2. I think is is good enough to last you a few years, unless of course you are a tech freak and must always have the latest and the best.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2009
  6. isaac4130

    isaac4130 Regular member

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    Agreed on the above advice to move closer - the more zoom, the less likely you are to get a clear shot. Like many people have said, use a tripod - these are cheap as chips nowdays and really worthwhile
     
  7. GryphB

    GryphB Regular member

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    Can't say I've been a big fan of point and shoot cameras, but here's the advice I can offer as I mostly use a digital SLR camera. If you are doing a fast action type of shot, you need to adjust your speed iso high enough to handle the request (shutter speed is a priority). Secondly, get a tripod, this will take away the noise effect, and any shaking caused by the one holding the camera. If your camera supports a remote, use it, that will also help reduce those effects. If you're trying a group photo, zoom in just enough that they are all in, readjust your shutter speed, and focus them in. also you should use a tripod and do a timed shot to reduce shaking and allow people warning to stop moving when its time to take the shot. I use a canon powershot A630 for most of my hanging out photos, and I understand the problems. Sometimes, it helps to just take some time and mess around with the camera settings until you are familiar with it's functions and limits. Lighting does have some impact on the subjects in the picture becoming all blurry. Be sure to check your AF points and see what is in focus and what isn't, and smack those of them that don't stay still, j/k. Putting the camera into sports mode doesn't always fix the problem with higher shutter speed. You sometimes have to put it into manual mode (M) and adjust the settings yourself. Does that help?
     

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