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Can DTS playback 24bit 48KHz WAVs?

Discussion in 'High resolution audio' started by gctes, May 1, 2007.

  1. gctes

    gctes Member

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    Hi I'm new to the forum.
    I have 24 Bit 48KHz stereo WAV audio files and I want to copy them to a DVD-RW and play them back on my DVD player that supports DTS/Dolby Digital and has 24bit96khz converters. I have a PC with a DVD burner.Can I do this with freeware or what software do I need?

    Thanks
     
  2. gctes

    gctes Member

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    I've just tried DVD-Audio Solo by Cirlinca and it doesn't seem to write rewritables.Am I doing something wrong?
     
  3. jjolson

    jjolson Member

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  4. gctes

    gctes Member

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    Thanks

    The audio tools option does seem a little complicated.

    Do you know of any software that definitely does DVD-RW?. I get the message "Not writable" (or something similar) in the processing window. Then the whole burning process is executed (like a dummy run) and the final line repeats that the DVD was "Not writable."
     
  5. gctes

    gctes Member

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    I've tried a DVD-RW and a DVD+RW and both give the same error at he end of writing as "Disk not writable".The files seem to have been written O.K.

    I read the help file and it does write DVD RWs.

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  6. gctes

    gctes Member

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    Sorry it looks like the software does write to DVD-RW and DVD+RW. It's just that my DVD player doesn't play it back. The disc not writable means that the drive is not ready.

    What software do I need to write the 24/48 as a DTS file that the DVD player will read?

    Cheers
     
  7. jjolson

    jjolson Member

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    Didn't read your first posts good enough, I thought you had a DVD-Audio capable player since you talked about the Cirlinca program.

    If you want DTS, it's not just a question of "copy tracks" to a DVD-RW, you need to buy a DTS encoder for that.

    But - for stereo 24/48 you DON'T NEED DTS, it's for multi-channel. You need some "DVD Audio Creator" type of program, which DOESN'T create and DVD-Audio disks. It create a standard DVD-Video disk with a dummy video track and a 24/48 PCM stereo track.
     
  8. gctes

    gctes Member

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    Thanks

    It's just that my Samsung DVD-611 doesn't playback the DVD-RW nor DVD+RW that I've tried with "Audio DVD creator". I was trying all the formats possible to get it to play. I haven't tried a DVDR as it destroys the objective of listening to 24 bit mixes at home. It has to be a rewritable to be an interesting option.

    Could it be the media? I have tried Imation and Verbatim.

    Any other ideas?
     
  9. jjolson

    jjolson Member

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    Most of those "Audio DVD Creators" doesn't let you make tracks with uncompressed 24/48 PCM tracks - but they ought to create *something" (possibly a Dolby 2.0 track), and it should be playable.

    Start with trying to play the things you create on your computer, and try more of those programs. Many of them are "try-before-you-buy" shareware programs.
     
  10. gctes

    gctes Member

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    Many thanks.

    I will keep trying software.

    I am presuming 24/48 DVD video files should always sound better than a 16/44.1 CD of the same material, right?
     
  11. jjolson

    jjolson Member

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    24 bits are valuable :)
     
  12. gctes

    gctes Member

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    When I burn to DVD in Audio DVD Creator I can burn as:

    WAV 24/48 (Which is what I have to start with) or

    AC3 2Ch 96-640kbps

    1.What is the difference?

    2.Which is the less Lossy?

    3.Using the AC3 option is it necessary to go for 640(Max) or is this just overkill on my source material. I read 250 was a good value.96 is the minimum value.
     
  13. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    24/48 WAV will always be higher quality as long as it wasn't just upsampled from a lower quality file. Upsampling can't re-create information that doesn't exist in the original samples, just interpolate it. Interpolation is essentially a fancy word for making an educated guess as to what the missing samples should be.

    AC-3 is just Dolby Digital and it's lossy compression. It's good for retaining decent sound while keeping a small file size. A 24/48 uncompressed WAV file, on the other hand, should have great sound. So basically uncompressed 24/48 WAV -> AC-3 would be dropping quality from wonderful to acceptable. I'm also assuming this is music of some kind, which will probably make it easier to spot the difference between the original and an AC-3 version of it.

    Edit: Just a word of caution about putting 24/48 uncompressed audio on a DVD. If you don't have a DVD-A (DVD-Audio) player the only way to play 24/48 on a standalone is by making a DVD-Video disc. While it's true that the DVD-Video specs allow for this, I've never heard of a DVD-V player that handles 24/48 audio without downsampling - essentially losing all that wonderful definition in the original. I've heard of many people who thought they had such a player, but in every case I've ever heard of it turned out it was being downsampled. Just another reason why I've bought my last standalone. When I get the money to finally put together what I need for capturing analog audio from my albums to 24/48 I'm going to stick to a computer with one of Terratec's reasonably priced firewire audio boxes for playback. One day I expect the studios will pull their heads out of their collective asses and actually sell audiophiles high quality audio that can be easily played back this way. Until then I'll just have to be happy with my record collection.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2007
  14. gctes

    gctes Member

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    Thanks Vurbal.

    The sound files I want to hear are the mixes from a home studio.To hear the mixes at home I thought it would be better to burn the 24/48 to DVD-V rather than mixing to 44.1.

    I presume that a standalone DVD player will always have better converters than a standalone CD player (Must handle 96kHz)and therefore sound better. At least I will get 48KHz instead of 44.1 even if the extra bits are ignored.

    Would you agree?

    I will look into the Teratec idea.

    Thanks again
     
  15. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

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    24/48 and 24/96 for that matter on a DVD-Video disc will be in spec.
    However, all that is actually mandated is 16/48.
    *most* players will play back 24/48 as intended, as well as 24/96.
    There are some that will not though, and these will truncate to 16 bits (very ugly).

    DTS can be used in stereo with no problems at all, and in fact is the most hassle-free way to do this.
    24/48 PCM on DVD requres the files to be authored, which means menus, visuals, graphics and all that goes with it.
    All you need to do for Stereo DTS is resample to 44.1KHz
    You can encode DTS-CD in Stereo with 24/44.1 or even 24/88.2 files.
    All it takes is the DTS decoder to play the CD back.

    Even compressed it sounds better than 16/44.1 does.
     
  16. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

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    Denon 2910, 2930, 3910, 3930 just by certain knowledge all play back up to 24/96 PCM from DVD-Video, as long as the settings are correct in the firmware.
    Also the Cambridge Audio 540D Azur (A very under-rated player indeed, also supports DVD-Audio)

    In general though, you are spot-on correct and 24/48 is not required to be supported, only 16/48 as higher bit fdepths & sample rates are optional only.
    FWIW, it's not actually mandatory to support written media of any type. All manuals will say that the players will play back a (correctly) finalized DVD-Video disc, but they will not guarantee it.....
     
  17. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    Thanks for the list. It's good to know that somebody has real support for it since it's completely optional. No surprise that it's Denon.
     
  18. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

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    What still amazes me are the amount of ill-informed folks who consider themselves Audiophiles who insist DVD-A is "not necessary because you can put 24/96 PCM on DVD-V discs".
     
  19. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    I've noticed that as well. I've seen more than one swear their player supported 24/48 or 24/96 only to be proven wrong by someone who actually looked at the player's technical specs. Given how easily that information is obtained (usually from the manufacturer's website) you would think people would be more careful about getting the facts straight if that's important to them.
     
  20. jjolson

    jjolson Member

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    Many more players than Denon, at reasonable prices, playback DVD-V 24/96 correctly. What is strange is that some (if reports are correct) DVD-Audio capable players that can play MLP 24/96 5.1 can't handle DVD-V 24/96 2.0, or even 24/48 2.0. Must be different chips used for the decoding...
     

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