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Clipping of EAC rips

Discussion in 'Audio' started by marren, Feb 22, 2004.

  1. marren

    marren Member

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    Hi!
    I have a problem with EAC. When I rip a cd it seems that the peak level becomes about +1 to +.5 dB resulting in several samples clipping. I wonder if anyone has the same problem and if they've found a solution.
    cheers
    Marren
     
  2. tigre

    tigre Moderator Staff Member

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    What format are you ripping/encoding to?
     
  3. marren

    marren Member

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    Mostly to wav for burning, in some cases mp3 using external LAME encoder v3.95.1 and the --alt-standard preset. I'm a bit confused since from what I've read clipping shouldn't be a problem when ripping to wav.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2004
  4. tigre

    tigre Moderator Staff Member

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    I asked about the format because lossy formats like mp3 can cause clipping on decoding of tracks that haven't clipped before. To deal with this you can use replaygain/mp3gain.
    http://replaygain.hydrogenaudio.org

    Something similar can happen if you use an equalizer (or other DSPs). Even if you only lower some bands and leave the other at 0 position, clipping can happen.

    I'm not completely sure what you're talking about, though:
    CD audio (16 bit PCM) can contain sample values between -32768 and +32767. Clipping would mean sample values out of this range - but these can't be stored on CD ... ;)
    [nitpicking mode: off]
    OTH many recent Pop/Rock CDs are mastered too loud using e.g. dynamics compression and also amplification to levels that introduce clipping (= sample values that would be out of +/-32767/8 range after amplification but are truncated to +/-32767/8).
    Depending on what program you've used to analyse your rips, peak levels > 0 are normal. For these programs peak level doesn't mean minimum/maximum sample value but they use some algorithm to judge perceived loudness. In this case "several samples clipping" would mean that there are more than 2 samples in a row with minimum or maximum sample value. As said above this is a sign of clipping that has happend during mastering, not during ripping. Another intersting link about this:
    http://loudnessrace.net
     
  5. marren

    marren Member

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    Ok that might be it. Thanks for your help.
     

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