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Does EAC compression option of 'high quality' = VBR?

Discussion in 'Audio' started by Wedge_Man, Sep 9, 2002.

  1. Wedge_Man

    Wedge_Man Member

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    Hi all. I'm new to this forum.

    The reason I am asking this question is because I have the setting at 'high quality' but I have chosen a bit rate of 128. When I look at the properties of a newly created mp3 it displays the 128 bit rate, which is what I would expect if the encoding was done at a CBR, rather than VBR.


    Now, just to make a comparison, I used Cdex to encode at a VBR. When I have a look at the properties of the file I see that the bit rate value is 503kbps.

    What I'm basically asking is this: If I choose 'high quality' when using EAC am I definitely using a VBR scheme to create the file? The reason I ask is because the bit rate value I see in the properties of the file appear to be a CBR value.

    If, in fact, I AM compressing with a VBR using EAC, does it even matter if I choose the bit rate value at all?

     
  2. cd-rw.org

    cd-rw.org Active member

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    IF you are using latest EAC, installed with the setup wizard, then the HIGH QUALITY witch should equal to "--alt-preset standard" commandline parameters which is VBR.

    If you are unsure, then just manually enter the "--alt-predset standard" to the options field. The bitrate selector has no effect since the -b value it defines is overridden in the alt-preset standard with "-b 128" (minimum VBR bitrate).
     
  3. Wedge_Man

    Wedge_Man Member

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    I am using the latest EAC, and High Quality. So, I have been using "--alt-preset standard" even though I didn't know it. The quality has been excellent; no complaints there. For some reason Windows Media Player just shows whatever bitrate happens to be chosen even though it makes no difference for the encoding.


    I'm curious.....when using "--alt-preset standard" the minimum is 128(VBR) then what is the maximum?
     
  4. cd-rw.org

    cd-rw.org Active member

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  5. Wedge_Man

    Wedge_Man Member

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    Thank you cd-wr.org for the link.

    Also, I wanted to mention that I have sorted out how to control the bit rate in EAC. Read on if you are a newbie. Otherwise, you probably already know this......

    To choose the constant bit rate (CBR) you must choose the LAME MP3 Encoder as the Parameter Passing Scheme (located in Compression Options) and then choose the bit rate from the bit rate drop-down menu.

    If, however, you wish to use the presets (which include VBR, ABR, and CBR) then you must choose User Defined Encoder in the Parameter Passing Scheme. Then you can use the command line options for entering the exact preset.

    The reason I'm sure it's working this way is because the DOS window that opens during encoding clearly shows which method is being applied.

    Now I am able to do what I orignally wanted, which is to compare mp3 quality among the different bit rates, both constant and variable.
     
  6. cd-rw.org

    cd-rw.org Active member

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  7. Wedge_Man

    Wedge_Man Member

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    Thank you for the link.

    I see where I am wrong in my assumptions.

    To all that read this...please disregard what I have said about "user defined encoder" and "LAME MP3 Encoder". That information is simply incorrect.
     

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