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recording copy-guarded material with VCR/DVD re-writer combo?

Discussion in 'Other video questions' started by corneileo, Jan 21, 2008.

  1. corneileo

    corneileo Member

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    Hello all!

    I just got a Samsung DVD Recorder & VCR, model DVD-VR330 as a late x-mas present. Well, I know to some people this would sound illegal, but due to the fact that DVDs, when taken care of, will last a whole lot longer than tapes, I would like to take all my pre-recorded VHS videos and copy them to DVDS. Well, I found out that this DVD recorder wont let me copy copyrighted material. Is there anyway to bypass whatever causes this? I dont feel like Im doing anything wrong. Ive already bought these videos on tape and would be rather upset if I had to re-buy them on DVD.

    Ive heard that in some of the older VCRs that there was something in there that you could put a piece of tape over that would somehow prevent the playing VCR from activating the copy-guard when it was plugged into a rcording VCR .

    If the above is true, is it possible to do this to this dual-deck VCR/DVD recorder?
     
  2. attar

    attar Senior member

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    Unless the deck has external connectors from the VCR that can connect to input connectors on the DVD Recorder, the Macrovision protection can't be bypassed.
    Note, though, that not all commercial VCR movie tapes have Macrovision.
     
  3. corneileo

    corneileo Member

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    So what yer saying, is the "electrical tape trick" wont work on this dual-deck VCR/DVDr? Where would find informaion about this? I cant remember where I found out about it, but I heard quite some time ago from someone that there was a little steel post inside a VCR that activates the copy guard, if there is one, when the outputs of that VCR was connected to another VCR.

    But, I guess if this dont work, I ave the Sima Color Corrector Pro-Series to hopefully block the copyguard. Te only bad thing, I'll have to use another VCR with my DVDr.

    One more thing, am I really breakin the law by doing this? Its not like Im makin illegal copies of my movies and sellin them to people. These are strictly used in my library.
     
  4. attar

    attar Senior member

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    Macrovision is part of the tape video.
    I don't know of any method to circumvent the protection, except by filtering electronically.

    Traditionally, recording machines incorporate an automatic gain control circuit that accepts the spurious signal and lightens and darkens the picture so that it is unwatchable.

    TV sets do not have this circuit and therefor show the picture as normal.
    New recording devices simply tell you that the source is copyright.

    A regular VCR's output jacks can be fed into a 'video enhancer' whose output is fed to the recording device, thus filtering out the protection signal.

    I use this in-and-out method with a standalone VCR and my DVD recorder.
     

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