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Whey Protein - URGENT

Discussion in 'All other topics' started by DiRect, Jun 10, 2007.

  1. DiRect

    DiRect Regular member

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    I just purchased "Six Star Muscle Fuel: Whey Protein"

    In the instructions it says, for maximum muscle build, take 2 servings 3 times daily... does that mean I take 2 servings at once 3 times a day for a total of 6 servings?

    Also, when am I supposed to drink this, after a workout or before, or does it matter when I drink it as long as I workout once a day... because I really do not intend to workout 3 times a day while taking the whey protein, so does it matter when I take it as long as I do 1 h 30 mins of intense workout every day?

    Once in the morning, once in the afternoon right BEFORE or AFTER my workout and once at night? Please advise.

    I need this question answered as quickly as possible please :)
     
  2. Indochine

    Indochine Regular member

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    Don't be fooled by the hype. Whey is great stuff for many reasons, but you won't "add mounds of muscle in ultra short time" from the simple addition of whey to your diet.
     
  3. DiRect

    DiRect Regular member

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    Yes, I knew that :p I know it won't immediately help right away, but it will make a difference over a period of time, that's why I am using it. Anyone else to answer the questions I asked?
     
  4. Ripper

    Ripper Active member

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    Sounds right to me.

    Can't answer the other questions as I don't take proteins.
     
  5. Indochine

    Indochine Regular member

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    The RDA (recommended daily allowance) for protein is 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body weight. However, protein expert Dr. Peter Lemon recently concluded that exercise more than doubles your need for protein. Based on his review of the research, Lemon reports that if you're exercising on a regular basis, you'll need to consume at least 1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight. For people who want to build muscle as fast as possible, this figure should be nearer 2.5 grams per kilogram of bodyweight.

    I can't answer the detailed questions about when to take the portions, although I would personally suppose they mean breakfast, lunch and evening meal times.

    As to the dosage you mention, 6 scoops of 25 grams each makes 150 grams which would, going by those figures above, be:-

    - the recommended amount RDA for a person of 416 pounds weight.

    - Dr Lemon's dose for a regularly exercising person of 194 pounds weight

    - Dr Lemon's dose for building muscle as fast as possible for a person of 132 pounds weight.

    Bearing in mind, even if you are a really big guy, you are taking the protein recommendation for a 416 pound man daily, even if you don't eat anything else, which you should be doing. I used to breed greyhounds, and let me tell you, if you feed 'em just protein, they get very fast on the track, but their leg bones snap easily.







     
  6. DiRect

    DiRect Regular member

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    Thanks Indochine your response really helped :)

    Okay this is how I plan to do it, I don't weigh anywhere near 416 lbs. I am in between 132 lbs. and 192 lbs. more on the 132 lbs. side (about 140-145 lbs. I believe).

    I originally eat a lot of food, and I try to eat healthy but being my age, its easy to get spoiled. I don't plan to completely stop eating when taking the protein shake, I will still consume milk and my normal diet because my workout sessions are pretty intense. The protein is supposed to help me lose fat as well, and I don't have a lot of fat left on my body, so I don't want to be hurting my body, but I figure if I eat the same way I eat now, I should keep that balanced out.

    Also the bones breaking easily part scares me, is there any research that this much protein consumption can weaken human bones as well (considering I will also consume my normal diet and not just the protein shake). The protein shake only has 110 calories. and only 3 grams of sugar per scoop, so that's not a lot of fat or sugar which is good. The thing is, I am not VERY big, but I am pretty muscular, but I plan to play football, so I want to get a little bigger size wise, not fat. I workout on a daily basis (except for the weekends) and as I said before, my workout sessions are very intense!

    What do you recommend I do?
     
  7. Indochine

    Indochine Regular member

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    I am not a nutritionist, but I reckon you should eat a normal balanced diet, and use the whey powder to bring your daily protein dose up to the 150g figure, rather than just exist on the whey stuff. That remark about brittle bones - I never had a dog break a leg, but some guys would feed dogs on a purely meat diet, they would get very brittle bones. i used to feed a mixed diet, wheatgerm, oats, biscuit, eggs, fish, milk, some meat, you get the idea.

     
  8. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    JUST SOME INFO,AS THIS INFO SHOULD HELP A ADULT


    The New Food Guide Pyramid




    October 19, 2005 02:55:01 AM PST

    When it comes to feeding your child, it may seem like there are a dizzying number of rules to follow. Your child needs nutrients to grow strong and healthy, but you also have to limit treats and serving sizes so that your child doesn't develop weight and health problems down the line.

    Obesity is becoming a common problem in the United States. Almost two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, and more than half of them get too little physical activity.

    U.S. nutrition officials are trying to help out. In 2005, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) created new dietary guidelines to provide more practical advice on how to give your child a healthy, balanced diet. The new guidelines suggest that kids eat more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains than in the past and that they get 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise each day. The recommendations are tailored for kids based on age, gender, and exercise habits. You can find out what guidelines are appropriate for your child by logging on to the USDA's website. (See the Additional Resources tab).

    With the new guidelines, the Food Guide Pyramid also got a new look and a new name: MyPyramid.

    Inside the pyramid, six stripes represent the five food groups as well as the oils and fats that your child should consume each day. Stairs on the pyramid represent the importance of exercise and the simple steps you can take each day to improve your child's health.

    * Orange: grains
    * Green: vegetables
    * Red: fruits
    * Blue: dairy and calcium-rich foods
    * Purple: proteins (meats, beans, and fish)
    * Yellow: fats and oils

    Keep in mind that the serving sizes are guidelines and that, on some days, your child may eat more or less of a certain food group. That's OK. Different foods have different mixes of nutrients, so it's important to offer your child a variety of foods on a regular basis. Moderation is a key part of a healthy diet.

    Also, remember that the nutrition content of a food can vary depending on how you prepare it. Apples, for example, are packed with nutrients and can make for a great after-school snack. Apple pie has all those nutrients. But it has lots of fats and sugars, too, so you may want to limit how much you serve.

    Grains
    The grains group, which includes foods like bread, cereal, rice, and pasta, should provide the majority of the energy your child needs each day.

    These foods are high in complex carbohydrates, which are the body's favorite fuel, and give your child the energy to play, pay attention in school, and do many other activities.

    Grains also provide other important nutrients such as vitamin B-complex (folate), which helps your child's body use the protein needed to build muscle.

    At least half of the grains your child consumes each day should be whole grains, such as oatmeal, brown rice, and rye bread. Whole grains contain dietary fiber that can help protect against diseases like heart disease and diabetes, and also help control your child's weight. They are different from refined grains, such as those in white bread and white rice, which have been processed, and many of the nutrients have been taken out.

    The new guidelines take into account a child's gender, age, and activity level. For example, for kids who get about 30 minutes of exercise per day, the USDA recommends:

    * 2- to 3-year-olds: 3 ounces
    * 4- to 8-year-olds: 4 to 5 ounces
    * 9- to 13-year-old girls: 5 ounces
    * 9- to 13-year-old boys: 6 ounces
    * 14- to 18-year-old girls: 6 ounces
    * 14- to 18-year-old boys: 7 ounces

    What's an ounce? Each of the following equals about 1 ounce:

    * 1 slice of bread
    * 1/2 cup of cooked rice or pasta
    * 1/2 cup of oatmeal

    Vegetables
    Vegetables provide many of the vitamins and minerals kids need for good health, and they provide fiber to aid digestion. So it's important to have a variety of them in your child's diet.

    Be sure to scrub vegetables before cooking them. It's best to steam or microwave vegetables, or eat them raw. Occasional stir-frying is OK. Boiling vegetables is also acceptable, but some of the vitamins and minerals will be lost to the cooking water.

    For kids who get about 30 minutes of exercise each day, the USDA recommends:

    * 2- to 3-year-olds: 1 cup
    * 4- to 8-year-olds: 1 1/2 cups
    * 9- to 13-year-old girls: 2 cups
    * 9- to 13-year-old boys: 2 1/2 cups
    * 14- to 18-year-old girls: 2 1/2 cups
    * 14- to 18-year-old boys: 3 cups

    more...

    When it comes to feeding your child, it may seem like there are a dizzying number of rules to follow. Your child needs nutrients to grow strong and healthy, but you also have to limit treats and serving sizes so that your child doesn't develop weight and health problems down the line.

    Obesity is becoming a common problem in the United States. Almost two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, and more than half of them get too little physical activity.

    U.S. nutrition officials are trying to help out. In 2005, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) created new dietary guidelines to provide more practical advice on how to give your child a healthy, balanced diet. The new guidelines suggest that kids eat more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains than in the past and that they get 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise each day. The recommendations are tailored for kids based on age, gender, and exercise habits. You can find out what guidelines are appropriate for your child by logging on to the USDA's website. (See the Additional Resources tab).

    With the new guidelines, the Food Guide Pyramid also got a new look and a new name: MyPyramid.

    Inside the pyramid, six stripes represent the five food groups as well as the oils and fats that your child should consume each day. Stairs on the pyramid represent the importance of exercise and the simple steps you can take each day to improve your child's health.

    On the pyramid, each color represents a different food group.

    * Orange: grains
    * Green: vegetables
    * Red: fruits
    * Blue: dairy and calcium-rich foods
    * Purple: proteins (meats, beans, and fish)
    * Yellow: fats and oils

    Keep in mind that the serving sizes are guidelines and that, on some days, your child may eat more or less of a certain food group. That's OK. Different foods have different mixes of nutrients, so it's important to offer your child a variety of foods on a regular basis. Moderation is a key part of a healthy diet.

    Also, remember that the nutrition content of a food can vary depending on how you prepare it. Apples, for example, are packed with nutrients and can make for a great after-school snack. Apple pie has all those nutrients. But it has lots of fats and sugars, too, so you may want to limit how much you serve.

    Grains
    The grains group, which includes foods like bread, cereal, rice, and pasta, should provide the majority of the energy your child needs each day.

    These foods are high in complex carbohydrates, which are the body's favorite fuel, and give your child the energy to play, pay attention in school, and do many other activities.

    Grains also provide other important nutrients such as vitamin B-complex (folate), which helps your child's body use the protein needed to build muscle.

    At least half of the grains your child consumes each day should be whole grains, such as oatmeal, brown rice, and rye bread. Whole grains contain dietary fiber that can help protect against diseases like heart disease and diabetes, and also help control your child's weight. They are different from refined grains, such as those in white bread and white rice, which have been processed, and many of the nutrients have been taken out.

    The new guidelines take into account a child's gender, age, and activity level. For example, for kids who get about 30 minutes of exercise per day, the USDA recommends:

    * 2- to 3-year-olds: 3 ounces
    * 4- to 8-year-olds: 4 to 5 ounces
    * 9- to 13-year-old girls: 5 ounces
    * 9- to 13-year-old boys: 6 ounces
    * 14- to 18-year-old girls: 6 ounces
    * 14- to 18-year-old boys: 7 ounces

    What's an ounce? Each of the following equals about 1 ounce:

    * 1 slice of bread
    * 1/2 cup of cooked rice or pasta
    * 1/2 cup of oatmeal

    Vegetables
    Vegetables provide many of the vitamins and minerals kids need for good health, and they provide fiber to aid digestion. So it's important to have a variety of them in your child's diet.

    Be sure to scrub vegetables before cooking them. It's best to steam or microwave vegetables, or eat them raw. Occasional stir-frying is OK. Boiling vegetables is also acceptable, but some of the vitamins and minerals will be lost to the cooking water.

    For kids who get about 30 minutes of exercise each day, the USDA recommends:

    * 2- to 3-year-olds: 1 cup
    * 4- to 8-year-olds: 1 1/2 cups
    * 9- to 13-year-old girls: 2 cups
    * 9- to 13-year-old boys: 2 1/2 cups
    * 14- to 18-year-old girls: 2 1/2 cups
    * 14- to 18-year-old boys: 3 cups

    Fruits
    Fruits are especially good sources of important vitamins like A and C. This food group also adds minerals such as potassium and fiber, which help digestion. Be sure to scrub fruits before feeding them to your child. It is best to eat fruits raw.

    For kids who get about 30 minutes of exercise each day, the USDA recommends:

    * 2- to 3-year-olds: 1 cup
    * 4- to 8-year-olds: 1 1/2 cups
    * 9- to 13-year-old girls: 1 1/2 cups
    * 9- to 13-year-old boys: 1 1/2 cups
    * 14- to 18-year-old girls: 1 1/2 cups
    * 14- to 18-year-old boys: 2 cups

    Dairy
    This food group, which includes milk and other foods like milk, yogurt, and cheese, is an important source of vitamin A, vitamin D, calcium, and protein.

    Vitamin A helps build healthy eyes, skin, and hair. Vitamin D helps your child's body absorb calcium and use it for healthy bones and teeth, along with muscle and nerve functions.

    For kids who get about 30 minutes of exercise each day, the USDA recommends:

    * 2- to 3-year-olds: 2 cups
    * 4- to 8-year-olds: 2 cups
    * 9- to 13-year-old girls: 3 cups
    * 9- to 13-year-old boys: 3 cups
    * 14- to 18-year-old girls: 3 cups
    * 14- to 18-year-old boys: 3 cups

    Meat, Fish, Beans, and Nuts
    This food group provides your child with protein, which helps your child's body maintain and repair body tissues and build muscle.

    Foods in this group also provide vitamin B-complex and iron, which helps build strong bones and teeth and support muscles.

    For kids who get about 30 minutes of exercise each day, the USDA recommends:

    * 2- to 3-year-olds: 2 ounces
    * 4- to 8-year-olds: 3 to 4 ounces
    * 9- to 13-year-old girls: 5 ounces
    * 9- to 13-year-old boys: 5 ounces
    * 14- to 18-year-old girls: 5 ounces
    * 14- to 18-year-old boys: 6 ounces

    Of course, 1 ounce of meat, poultry, or fish counts as a 1-ounce serving for this group. In general, the following each equal about 1 ounce:

    * 1/4 cup cooked dry beans
    * 1 egg
    * 1 tablespoon of peanut butter
    * 1/2 ounce of nuts or seeds

    Fats, Oils, and Sweets
    Fats and oils are essential nutrients to maintain body function but should be used sparingly. Fats help the body absorb vitamins A, D, E, K, and beta-carotene. Even though fats may be needed to maintain good health, it may be a good idea to limit them, since they still contain calories.

    Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature, like the vegetable oils that are commonly used in cooking. Oils can come from many different plants and fish. Some other common oils include olive oil, corn oil, soybean oil, and sunflower oil.

    Some foods are naturally high in oils, like nuts, olives, some fish, and avocados. Most oils are high in monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats. These fats raise your child's level of (good) HDL cholesterol, which seems to help prevent heart problems, and do not raise levels of (bad) LDL cholesterol, which can lead to heart problems.

    Solid fats, like butter, shortening, and margarine, contain more saturated fats or trans fats, which can raise (bad) LDL cholesterol levels in the blood and increase your child's risk for heart disease.

    Fats shouldn't be restricted in children under age 2. The developing brain and other organs of the young child need a certain amount of fat for proper development.

    Sugars are quickly absorbed into the bloodstream to provide your child a quick dose of energy. It's a good idea to limit the amount of sugar you feed your child from candy, sweets, and other foods. That's because the body stores the extra sugar it doesn't immediately need as fat. That can lead to weight gain and other health problems.

    Updated and reviewed by: Barbara P. Homeier, MD
    Date reviewed: April 2005
    Originally reviewed by: Heidi Kecskemethy, RD, CSP
     
  9. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    The Longevity Diet


    By Matt McMillen
    Last Updated: 12/01/2006 09:18:26
    The fountain of youth has yet to be found, bottled, and sold for $3.99 at Whole Foods. But that doesn't mean the secret to living a long, healthy life can't be bought at the supermarket. "By eating right, you maximize the probability that you won't develop conditions like diabetes or Alzheimer's," says James Joseph, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Beyond choosing the best foods, new and intriguing evidence shows that eating less — less than you probably think — can reduce the toll time takes on your body.

    We pored over the latest research on how food affects your life span and found seven no-fail food rules. Follow them — plus the detailed eating plan we created — and you'll have the best possible chance of blowing out 100 candles on your birthday cake. Not to mention keeping your much older self out of the rocker and on the dance floor, yoga mat, mountain bike — or wherever else you want to be.

    RULE 1: Go For Color
    The biggest anti-aging breakthrough in recent history comes from new discoveries about the power of antioxidants. For those who have heard the word but are fuzzy on the details, here's a crash course. As the cells in our bodies metabolize oxygen, unstable molecules called free radicals form. These cause cell damage that has been linked to age-related illnesses like Alzheimer's and heart disease. Many scientists think that all symptoms of aging are the direct result of free radicals attacking our cells.

    Antioxidants (cue the superhero music) neutralize free radicals, preventing them from doing any damage — and thereby slowing the aging process. "Antioxidants can even reverse damage to our cells," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, R.D., a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. While there's ongoing debate about how many of the large variety of food-derived antioxidants our bodies can actually use and how efficiently we can use them, a convincing pile of research points to a strong connection between foods loaded with antioxidants and a longer, healthier life.

    Luckily, spotting foods high in the amazing stuff is easy, thanks to a handy trick of nature: They're the ones bursting with color. Berries have tons of antioxidants, and according to Dr. Joseph's research, they help maintain cognitive and motor functioning as we age. Pomegranates have been found to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. And results recently published in the British Journal of Cancer show that broccoli and brussels sprouts — which will probably taste better to you now than they did when you were 5 — contain compounds that help prevent breast cancer.

    RULE 2: Rely On Real Food, Not Supplements
    Given all the hype about antioxidants, your local health-food store is probably already shilling an antioxidant pill with a label covered in promises. Well, stroll past it. Supplements have nothing on fresh, whole foods. Case in point: the massive Iowa Women's Health Study. Researchers found that among the 34,492 women participating in the study, those who ate foods rich in vitamin E, such as nuts, lessened their chances of suffering a stroke. Vitamin E supplements, on the other hand, provided no protection.

    Natural foods contain "thousands of compounds that interact in complex ways, and if you take one out, there's no predicting how it will function on its own," says Frank Hu, Ph.D., associate professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. He points out that large-scale trials of individual antioxidant supplements have been largely disappointing.

    RULE 3: Avoid Processed Foods
    Processed foods — those full of preservatives, chemicals, and added colors — simply aren't as nutritious. And every time you eat a highly processed food, you're bypassing another food that actually can help delay the effects of aging.

    The classic example is whole-wheat bread versus white bread. Whole wheat is proven to fight heart disease, thanks to its abundance of fiber and other nutrients. White bread isn't. "Many nutrients are taken out during processing, and few are put back," says Lisa Hark, Ph.D., R.D., director of nutrition education at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

    Your body also typically digests whole food more slowly than processed food, which keeps blood sugar and insulin levels from fluctuating rapidly. "In the long term, this may help you avoid diabetes," Dr. Hu says. And because whole foods pack fewer calories per gram, they ward off weight-related illnesses like heart disease and stroke.

    RULE 4: Don't Be Afraid Of (Good) Fats
    Fat is not a four-letter word. "Unsaturated fats from vegetable oils, nuts, avocados, and fish improve insulin sensitivity and reduce blood lipids," Dr. Hu says. That translates into lower risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke.

    Healthy fats help make the Mediterranean-style diet — consisting mostly of vegetables, nuts, beans, olive oil, and fish — so superior. The Harvard School of Public Health and University of Athens Medical School found that this type of diet reduces the risk of death from heart disease and cancer by 25 percent. And a recent Columbia University Medical Center study reported that it can lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease by 40 percent.

    Treating yourself to salmon and other fish that deliver omega-3 fatty acids two to four times a week, along with a small handful of nuts a day, may reduce your risk of heart disease by 30 percent and lower your cholesterol as well, according to research from Harvard. Your looks will benefit too: Early evidence suggests that omega-3s will have your grandkids crooning, "Grandma, what soft, wrinkle-free skin you have!"

    RULE 5: Sip Red Wine
    Another revelation of the Harvard/Athens study was the benefits of red wine. Drinking one glass a day, four to five times a week (preferably with a meal), has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attacks, diabetes, and other life-threatening illnesses. Part of the credit goes to the alcohol, which helps soothe inflamed arteries. But specific to red wine — especially pinot noir — are antioxidants called flavonoids which are particularly good free-radical fighters.

    Consuming wine conservatively (pace yourselves, people) will help you reap all the heart-healthy benefits, but you should go easier on the bottle as you age: Alcohol consumption has been linked to increased risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

    RULE 6: Guzzle Green Tea
    Packed with powerful antioxidants — this time called catechins — green tea may be the single most life-prolonging substance you can put in your cup. A mug a day will decrease your chance of developing high blood pressure by 46 percent. (A good thing, since 35 million women are currently hypertensive.) Drink more and reduce your risk by 65 percent.

    Enough studies have shown green tea's ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells that the National Cancer Institute is conducting trials on both a tea-based pill and a topical ointment to treat cancerous skin growths.

    The best of the best? A recent study in the Journal of Food Science found that, of all 77 U.S. brands tested, Stash Darjeeling Organic Green Tea delivers the greatest number of catechins — 100 per gram.

    RULE 7: Eat Less
    Want proof that staying slim is linked to a longer, more enjoyable life? Just look around: The 90-somethings running after their grandkids on the beach or dancing at weddings aren't the overweight ones.

    Science backs this up. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health found that women who stayed closest to their weight at 18 — yes, 18 — throughout their lives had a 66 percent lower risk of developing heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and gallstones compared with women who put on 11 to 22 pounds by middle age. Another study found that women who gained 60 pounds after age 18 were up to three times more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Of course, as we age, extra pounds seem to materialize out of nowhere. "If you keep the physical activity the same and food the same, you will put on a pound or two a year," says Walter Willett, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health and one of the lead researchers of the study. Thanks to a natural decrease in hormones that help maintain muscle mass, "those muscles shrink, you burn less energy, and you accumulate fat," he says.

    There's a two-part solution. First, start weight training, if you don't already, and keep it up through the years to retain calorie-burning muscles.

    And, more important, start cutting calories — while keeping nutrients. In 2004, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reported that people who consistently ate 10to 25 percent fewer calories than the average American, while still keeping a balanced diet, had remarkably low blood pressure and low levels of bad cholesterol and triglycerides — too much of which can spell "heart attack." Reduced calorie intake has also been linked to lower risk of cancer and Alzheimer's.

    The National Academy of Science has several theories about why eating less makes such a difference. While we often strive to boost our metabolism to stay slim, some researchers believe we need to do the opposite to live longer: A low-cal diet slows your metabolism, and a slow metabolism produces fewer free radicals. When you eat less, you also produce less glucose, which has been linked to cell damage. And low-calorie diets reduce your body's core temperature and its response to insulin, both of which may increase longevity in humans.

    Okay. If you start skipping snacks, how many years will you add to your life? Doctors aren't sure — but studies have shown that calorie-restricted rats live 30 percent longer than rats that eat normally.

    This rule is the toughest one of all to follow. But if it makes you feel better, Sergei Romashkan, M.D., Ph.D., chief of clinical trials at the National Institute of Aging, says that eating 25 percent less than usual caused very little crankiness in his study subjects. "Our participants were quite happy and full," he says.

    And that's the best news about the longevity diet — there are enough filling, delicious, life-saving foods out there that you can stay happy and satisfied. Does knowing this make resisting ice cream any easier? Probably not. But if you find something that does, let us know.
     
  10. pstamer

    pstamer Guest

    Hello DiRect: I would use the whey protein within 2 hours after the workout. That's when your muscles need the protein the most in order to minimize muscle recuperating time. Also a huge part fo the muscle growth process takes place while you sleep, so try to get between 8 to 10 hours of sleep. Hope this helps. Happy workout.
     
  11. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    More Food, Less Fat
    Provided by: Men's Health
    By D. Milton Stokes, R.D., Men's Health
    Last Updated: 12/04/2006 13:00:37

    Some things are sadly predictable. Extra winter poundage, for instance. Or holiday binges. Or the 3 o'clock slump, which sags before you like a hammock every afternoon.

    Here's a happier prediction: Eat more often and you'll avoid all of those problems. Spreading six smaller meals across your day operates on the simple principle of satisfaction. Frequent meals tame the slavering beast of hunger. The secret? Each mini meal should blend protein and fiber-rich complex carbohydrates. "Protein and fiber give you that feeling of satiety and keep you from feeling hungry," says Tara Geise, R.D., a nutritionist in private practice in Orlando and a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association (ADA).

    Controlling hunger shrinks your gut. In a study published in the International Journal of Obesity, one group of overweight men was given five small meals, then was free to choose a sixth meal. A second group ate a single meal containing the same number of calories as the total of the other group's first five meals, then later had a free-choice second meal. The six-meal men ate 27 percent less food at their last meal than the two-meal men did at their second.

    Consistent eating will also keep your protein levels high, helping you build muscle. "Your body can metabolize only so much protein at one time," says Katherine Tallmadge, R.D., author of Diet Simple. "Protein is metabolized better when it's divided evenly."

    The challenge is keeping the mini meals mini. "It's critical that at the end of the day, the calorie content of your mini meals does not exceed what you would eat in three larger meals," says Jeannie Moloo, Ph.D., R.D., an ADA spokeswoman in Roseville, California. If you already know your calorie count, start eating.

    With a suggested calorie count in hand, you can mix and match from the list of meals shown here. Yes, you can take two items from one meal list—if they're small. Looking to lose? Choose lower-calorie options. Regular Joe? Be as flexible as you please. Building muscle? Double up on a couple of the items—have an extra slice of pizza or two containers of yogurt.
    Breakfast: (6 to 8:30 a.m.)
    You're sleepy, so we'll keep it simple: Mix protein and quality carbs. "When protein is included in a meal, not only does it help prevent overeating at other times of day, but it also sustains energy levels and improves concentration," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, M.A., R.D., C.D.N., an ADA spokeswoman. This means choosing a milk-infused latte instead of plain coffee, or a slather of peanut butter along with the jelly on an English muffin. Do not leave home without breakfast—this is the foundation for the rest of your day.

    1. 110 calories: Latte with reduced-fat milk
    2. 140 calories: Skippy brand Squeeze Stick of peanut butter
    3. 200 calories: 1 cup reduced-sodium cottage cheese with fresh peaches and cinnamon
    4. 200 calories: 1 cup blackberries, blueberries, or strawberries with 6 ounces light yogurt and 1 tablespoon low-fat granola
    5. 250 calories: Any-way-you-like-it egg on a whole-grain English muffin with melted cheese
    6. 250 calories: Oatmeal made with milk instead of water; add brown sugar, walnuts, and/or any fresh or dried fruit
    7. 260 calories: Cold whole-grain cereal, such as Kashi or raisin bran, with reduced-fat milk
    8. 300 calories: Peanut butter and jelly on a whole-grain English muffin
    9. 300 calories: Scrambled-egg burrito with turkey sausage and salsa
    10. 300 calories: Two-egg omelet with spinach, mushrooms, and feta cheese

    Midmorning Snack: (9:30 to 10:30 a.m.)
    Planning matters. If there's nothing but junk in your workplace vending machines, buy the foods you need—string cheese, granola bars, trail mix, whatever—and keep a stash at your desk. (See "Make It, Take It," below.) 1. 80 calories: Stick of string cheese2. 100 calories: Hard-boiled egg with a handful of grape tomatoes3. 180 calories: Nature Valley granola bar4. 250 calories: Ready-made reduced-fat smoothie, such as Stonyfield Farm5. 250 calories: Clif bar6. 275 calories: 2 or 3 small handfuls of trail mix7. 290 calories: Kellogg's Nutri-Grain bar with a handful of pistachios or almonds8. 300 calories: Slice of whole-grain bread topped with peanut butter and banana 9. 300 calories: Small bagel with 2 slices of Muenster cheese, melted10. 400 calories: Medium-size fruit muffin (best if made with whole-wheat flour)
    Lunch: (12 to 1:30 p.m.)
    Be careful here! If you've had only a latte, fruit, and some string cheese so far, go ahead and have a big lunch. But if you've already eaten 700 calories (an omelet and a muffin, say), keep lunch light. Whatever you do, eat slowly, no matter how un-American that seems. It'll help you feel satisfied—and keep you that way.

    1. 175 calories: Canned tuna with balsamic vinegar on whole-grain crackers or bread
    2. 300 calories: 3 corn-tortilla flautas stuffed with refried beans and dipped in salsa
    3. 350 calories: Half an avocado, sliced, or ½ cup prepared guacamole with tomato and onion in a whole-grain pita
    4. 375 calories: Baked potato with chopped broccoli and a slice of American cheese, melted
    5. 400 calories: Seafood salad in a whole-grain pita with diced tomato, cucumber, and onion
    6. 400 calories: 3 or 4 slices of bacon, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese, thin apple slices, and peanut butter on toasted whole-grain bread
    7. 400 calories: ½ cup hummus with roasted vegetables
    8. 400 calories: Small ham-, turkey-, or roast-beef-and-Swiss wrap with vegetables and mustard, in a whole-wheat tortilla
    9. 400 calories: Fresh mozzarella and tomato slices on a bed of greens, with balsamic vinaigrette and extra-virgin olive oil
    10. 450 calories: Six pierogi with salsa or reduced-fat sour cream
    Midafternoon Snack (2:30 to 3:30 p.m.)
    Steer clear of the candy bowl on your P.A.'s desk. "You could eat four small chocolates for 100 calories," says Geise, "or you could eat a cup of yogurt." The chocolate gives you hardly any protein; the yogurt delivers 8 grams.

    1. 160 calories: Reduced-fat Cheddar melted on apple halves
    2. 175 calories: 5 Laughing Cow cheese wedges
    3. 200 calories: ½ cup baba ghanoush (roasted-eggplant dip) with vegetables
    4. 210 calories: Half a container of Cracker Jack
    5. 250 calories: 1 cup reduced-fat yogurt
    6. 250 calories: Small handful of chopped pecans over a cup of fruit salad
    7. 260 calories: Apple, pear, or banana smeared with peanut butter
    8. 300 calories: Cup of chickpeas with a dash of cumin and fresh mint
    9. 340 calories: 2 ounces roasted nuts
    10. 350 calories: 1 cup each fat-free milk and frozen yogurt blended with a spoonful of peanut butter
    Dinner: (5:30 to 7:30 p.m.)
    Okay, this isn't dinner as you used to know it. But don't panic. At first, reining in meal sizes will seem strange. But portion control can make or break the plan. "This is crucial, whether you're looking to control weight, manage blood sugar, or maintain energy levels," says Tallmadge. And remember—you'll be eating again in 2 hours.

    1. 200 calories: 2 cups mixed vegetables (fresh or frozen) with ½ cup marinara sauce and some grated Parmesan cheese
    2. 275 calories: 3 or 4 large handfuls of greens sautéed in olive oil with a handful of walnuts and ½ cup raisins
    3. 300 calories: 6-piece sushi meal with a cup of miso soup
    4. 325 calories: Buffalo burger topped with coleslaw, onion, and tomato
    5. 350 calories: Quesadilla made with a small corn or whole-wheat tortilla, cheese, beans, shredded chicken or lean ground beef, onion, and jalapenos, and dipped in salsa
    6. 400 calories: Slice of pizza topped with cheese and ground beef or ham
    7. 400 calories: Turkey London broil cut into strips, sautéed with onion, red and orange bell pepper, and teriyaki sauce
    8. 450 calories: Small plateful of nachos—baked tortilla chips, shredded reduced-fat cheese, refried beans, and salsa (plus some corn or black beans, if you want)
    9. 500 calories: Lentil, minestrone, or tomato soup with a grilled-cheese sandwich on whole-grain bread
    10. 550 calories: 1 cup pasta tossed with browned ground turkey breast, black olives, diced onion, a drizzle of olive oil, and 1 ½ tablespoons crumbled Gorgonzola cheese

    Evening Snack: (8:30 to 10 p.m.)
    Famished? Feeling as if this was the longest day of your life? Maybe your calorie count is too low. Adjust it by adding more sensible foods to your plan. Or try choosing higher-fiber foods; they're digested slowly, so they'll help you feel fuller longer.

    1. 150 calories: 5 cups Jolly Time light microwave popcorn sprinkled with hot sauce and/or 1 tablespoon Romano cheese
    2. 150 calories: 1 cup rice pudding
    3. 150 calories: 6 or 7 strawberries dipped in yogurt and drizzled with chocolate sauce
    4. 150 calories: 1 cup cocoa made with skim milk
    5. 175 calories: Sliced sweet potato (with skin), tossed in olive oil and baked
    6. 175 calories: 1 cup skim ricotta cheese sweetened with Splenda, vanilla flavoring, and a dash of nutmeg or cinnamon
    7. 175 calories: Seltzer with 2 scoops frozen yogurt, a handful of berries, and a shot of flavoring syrup, such as strawberry or cherry
    8. 200 calories: Root-beer float with 2 scoops frozen vanilla yogurt
    9. 200 calories: 2 handfuls olives
    10. 275 calories: 2-ounce Snickers bar
     
  12. MasterChu

    MasterChu Guest

    Moving to Langjökull in Iceland - so all the info I posted is moving with me!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 11, 2007
  13. DiRect

    DiRect Regular member

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    thanks everyone, thats a lot of information

    thats pretty intense MasterChu but I don't wanna go that far :p

    I don't plan on consuming 10,000 calories a day and 300 grams of protein. I will maintain my normal diet, with the 150 grams of protein, will that be fine?

    My workouts are not TORTURE but they are still pretty intense. I am just waiting to get a little older than I might try that, but if I just eat normally with the 150 grams of protein a day on top of that (ill take two servings in the morning, two in the afternoon after my workout and two at night before I sleep) will that help me develop properly over a period of time? Will my strength increase? Will my muscle body mass increase?

    That's all I want, I don't want to be THE HULK MasterChu :p
     
  14. MasterChu

    MasterChu Guest

    Moving to Langjökull in Iceland - so all the info I posted is moving with me!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 11, 2007

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