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Ask Your Vista Questions Here.

Discussion in 'Windows - General discussion' started by ozzy214, Feb 24, 2006.

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  1. ozzy214

    ozzy214 Regular member

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    I got to experience vista beta 2 and thought it sucked just like win 64 bit pro. Your thoughts?
     
  2. wdowsing

    wdowsing Regular member

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    At the moment every 64 bit os that microsux have brought out sucks, even tho its not all there fault, the manufactures of comp components arnt helping by not releasing any older drivers out for 64, so although microsoft try to make ppl think is great its just a money making schemel ... again.
     
  3. svar91

    svar91 Regular member

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    i'd say stick with xp until all the bugs are fixed in vista.
     
  4. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    OR stick with win 95 until all the bugs are worked out of win,98,me.2000.and xp.
    go win 95...
    [​IMG]
     
  5. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    Ten Reasons to Buy Windows Vista

    And a few reasons to think twice before upgrading.

    Michael Desmond
    Tuesday, February 21, 2006

    Unless you've been living under a rock for the past few months, you probably know that the latest version of Windows--called Vista--is due to hit store shelves later this year (in time for the holidays, Microsoft tells us). The successor to Windows XP offers a little something for everyone, from eye-catching graphics and new bundled applications to more-rigorous security. In fact, there is so much in the new operating system that it can be tough to get a handle on it all.


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    I've been noodling around with a recent beta version of Windows Vista (Build 5270) and had a chance to make some observations. While the sleek new look and polished interface caught my eye, it's what's under the covers that impressed me most. Microsoft's done a great job of improving security across the board. Things like Windows and spyware library updates are streamlined, and I definitely appreciate the more robust Backup software.

    Still, there's plenty of unfinished work left to do. Internet Explorer 7 struggled to properly render some Web pages, and I found local network connectivity to be a hit-or-miss affair. And then there's the stuff that isn't even in there yet--like the intriguing Windows Sidebar, which will put real-time weather info, stock quotes, system status, RSS feeds, and other information on the display.

    So during my time with Windows Vista, I kept an eye out for the reasons I--and you--might ultimately want to lay my hands on the new OS when it's available. And frankly, if you buy a new Windows-based PC at the end of this year or any time in, say, the next five years, you'll probably end up with Vista by default.

    Keep in mind, this is based solely on my experience with prerelease software (and a whole new beta could be out by the time you read this). Features get tweaked, they come and go, but from what we can tell, Vista is now starting to harden into the product that will be running many, many desktops for the foreseeable future. And by and large, that's a good thing.

    Here's what to be excited about:

    1. Security, security, security: Windows XP Service Pack 2 patched a lot of holes, but Vista takes security to the next level. There are literally too many changes to list here, from the bidirectional software firewall that monitors inbound and outbound traffic to Windows Services Hardening, which prevents obscure background processes from being hijacked and changing your system. There's also full-disk encryption, which prevents thieves from accessing your data, even if they steal the PC out from under your nose.

    Perhaps most crucial (and least sexy) is the long-overdue User Account Protection, which invokes administrator privileges as needed, such as during driver updates or software installations. UAP makes it much more convenient for users to operate Vista with limited rights (meaning the system won't let them do certain things, like load software, without clearance from an administrator). This in turn limits the ability of malware to hose your system.

    2. Internet Explorer 7: IE gets a much-needed, Firefox-inspired makeover, complete with tabbed pages and better privacy management. There's also the color-coded Address Bar that lets you know if a page is secured by a digital key, or, thanks to new antiphishing features, if it's a phony Web site just looking to steal information about you.

    These features will all be available for Windows XP users who download IE7. But Vista users get an important extra level of protection: IE7 on Vista will run in what Microsoft calls "protected mode"--a limited-rights mode that prevents third-party code from reaching your system. It's about darn time.

    3. Righteous eye candy: For the first time, Microsoft is building high-end graphics effects into Windows. The touted Aero Glass interface features visually engaging 3D rendering, animation, and transparencies. Translucent icons, program windows, and other elements not only look cool, they add depth and context to the interface. For example, hover your cursor over minimized programs that rest on the taskbar and you'll be able to see real-time previews of what's running in each window without opening them full-screen. Now you can see what's going on behind the scenes, albeit at a cost: You need powerful graphics hardware and a robust system to manage all the effects.

    4. Desktop search: Microsoft has been getting its lunch handed to it by Google and Yahoo on the desktop, but Vista could change all that. The new OS tightly integrates instant desktop search, doing away with the glacially slow and inadequate search function in XP. Powerful indexing and user-assignable metadata make searching for all kinds of data--including files, e-mails, and Web content--a lot easier. And if you're running Vista on a Windows Longhorn network, you can perform searches across the network to other PCs.

    5. Better updates: Vista does away with using Internet Explorer to access Windows Update, instead utilizing a new application to handle the chore of keeping your system patched and up-to-date. The result is quicker response and a more tightly streamlined process. The update-tracking mechanism, for instance, is much quicker to display information about your installation. And now key components, such as the Windows Defender antispyware module, get their updates through this central point. Like other housekeeping features, a better Windows Update isn't a gee-whiz upgrade, but it should make it easier--and more pleasant--to keep your PC secure.

    6. More media: Over the years, one of the key reasons to upgrade versions of Windows has been the free stuff Gates and Company toss into the new OS, and Vista is no exception. Windows Media Player (perhaps my least favorite application of all time) gets a welcome update that turns the once-bloated player into an effective MP3 library. The Windows Photo Gallery finally adds competent photo-library-management functionality to Windows, so you can organize photos; apply metatags, titles, and ratings; and do things like light editing and printing. The DVD Maker application, which was still very rough when I looked at it, promises to add moviemaking capabilities--along the lines of Movie Maker--to the operating system. There are even some nice new games tucked into the bundle.

    7. Parental controls: Families, schools, and libraries will appreciate the tuned-up parental controls, which let you limit access in a variety of ways. Web filtering can block specific sites, screen out objectionable content by selected type, and lock out file downloads. You can also restrict each account's access by time of day or day of the week. As a dad, I can tell you this will be great for keeping kids off the PC while you're at work, for instance. You can even block access to games based on their Entertainment Software Rating Board ratings.

    8. Better backups: When Windows 95 first came out, the typical hard disk was, maybe, 300MB in size. Today, desktops routinely ship with 300GB or 400GB hard drives. And yet, the built-in data-backup software in Windows has changed little in the past decade. Windows Vista boasts a much-improved backup program that should help users avoid wholesale digital meltdowns. Microsoft also tweaked the useful System Restore feature--which takes snapshots of your system state so you can recover from a nasty infection or botched software installation.

    9. Peer-to-peer collaboration: The Windows Collaboration module uses peer-to-peer technology to let Vista users work together in a shared workspace. You can form ad hoc workgroups and then jointly work on documents, present applications, and pass messages. You can even post "handouts" for others to review.

    10. Quick setup: Beta code alert: There are some Vista features I hope dearly for even though they haven't been built yet. This is one of them. Jim Allchin, Microsoft's co-president, says that Windows Vista boasts a re-engineered install routine, which will slash setup times from about an hour to as little as 15 minutes. Hurray! The new code wasn't in the beta version of Vista that Microsoft sent to me--my aging rig took well over an hour to set up--so I'll believe it when I see it. Still, any improvement in this area is welcome.

    Five Things That Will Give You Pause

    All this is not to say that Vista is a slam-dunk and everyone should be running out to buy it as soon as Microsoft takes the wraps off. Heck, Windows XP has developed into a fairly stable, increasingly secure OS. Why mess with that?

    Yes, during my time with Vista, I've found more than enough features to get excited about--features that will make a sizable chunk of Windows users want to upgrade. So why would anyone in their right mind stick with what they've got? Here are a few reasons:

    Pay that piper: Vista is an operating system. It's the stuff your applications run on. But it'll cost $100 or more to make the switch. Unless you're buying a new PC and starting from scratch, you may be better off saving the money for something else.

    Where's my antivirus?: For all the hype about security in Windows Vista, users may be disappointed to learn that antivirus software will not be part of the package. There's every indication that an online subscription service--possibly under the OneCare rubric--will offer antivirus protection to Vista users down the road. But for the time being, you'll need to turn to third-party companies like Symantec, McAfee, Grisoft, and others for virus protection.

    Watch that hourglass: Vista is a power hog. Unless you have a top-end PC with high-end graphics hardware, for instance, you won't see one of the coolest parts of the new OS--the Aero Glass interface. Microsoft did the smart thing by offering Aero Basic and Windows Classic looks as well, which will let older and slower PCs run Vista. It just won't look as pretty.

    Curse the learning curve: Microsoft has already ditched some aggressive ideas--such as the whole "virtual folders" thing--because the concepts proved too confusing for users. Even so, you'll find that the new Windows changes a lot of old tricks, and not always for the better. Heck, it took me almost five minutes to find the Run command, which used to show up right in the Start menu. And many users may struggle with the new power scheme, which defaults to putting the PC into hibernation rather than shutting down. I know it frustrated me the first time I wanted to power down the system to swap out a disk drive.

    Meet the old boss, same as the new boss: Microsoft has added lots of new stuff to Vista, but some features are just warmed-over fare. Windows Mail is nothing more than a rebranded Outlook Express, and Windows Defender is simply an updated version of Microsoft AntiSpyware.

    So keep your eyes peeled for future previews of Vista. It may not be perfect (what software is?), but in a lot of ways, it's a giant leap forward.

    Michael Desmond writes about technology from his home in Colchester, Vermont.
    http://pcworld.com/reviews/article/0,aid,124642,00.asp
     
  6. esrever

    esrever Regular member

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    But still lacks DOS.
     
  7. ozzy214

    ozzy214 Regular member

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    Hmm...I been trying out vista and it seems nice with the eye candy, but yet I cant get it to run on virtual pc. I had to find a junk hard drive to install it on. Setup takes a long fricking time.

    Also now I recently found out there are two versions of vista. 32 and 64 bit. I have no idea which version I have other than dec release, but it sucks. It acts just like 64 bit pro. Im running this on the first pc in my sig and I have problems like slow loading of proggies and when playing music it stutters like a cd skipping. SO I really dont see what the hype is about..:>
     
  8. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    Windows Vista Hardware Requirements
    While not providing exact specifications (such as recommended processor speed) this is a good guideline if you are looking at buying a new computer now.

    I think the real key here is the video card. People LOVE graphics so if you are in the market for a new PC and you have to make a choice between a higher end graphic card or a really fast, kick-ass processor go with the graphics card. This is a balancing act for sure.

    So you’re getting ready to buy a new computer, and you want to make sure that the computer you buy now will work well with Windows Vista. Well, the good news is that just about any new computer you buy today will work fine with Windows Vista. Because of the way Windows Vista is designed, it will work well across a broad range of hardware. However, to get the best Windows Vista experience, there are some basic system requirements and suggestions you need to know about. In this column, I’ll take a look at how to make decisions now that will leave you in the best possible position when Windows Vista ships.

    - Microsoft.com
    - blogs.msdn.com
    __________________
    Digital Dave
    digital@winxpcentral.com
    2004/2005/2006 Microsoft MVP



    Windows Vista Hardware
    Which decisions to make now so that you're ready for Windows Vista
    By Charlie Russel, Microsoft MVP for Windows Server, Security, and Tablet PC

    So you’re getting ready to buy a new computer, and you want to make sure that the computer you buy now will work well with Windows Vista. Well, the good news is that just about any new computer you buy today will work fine with Windows Vista. Because of the way Windows Vista is designed, it will work well across a broad range of hardware. However, to get the best Windows Vista experience, there are some basic system requirements and suggestions you need to know about. In this column, I’ll take a look at how to make decisions now that will leave you in the best possible position when Windows Vista ships. The examples I’ll use below cover the products that are available as of beta 1 (July 2005).
    *
    On This Page
    Processor (CPU) Processor (CPU)
    Memory Memory
    Graphics Graphics
    Storage Storage
    Networking Networking
    Summary Summary
    Contact Me Contact Me
    Processor (CPU)

    As a general guideline, just about any mid-range and better processor shipping from Intel or AMD is a good fit for basic functionality in Windows Vista. The lower end of the current processor range will work, but those processors wont provide the optimal experience for most users and definitely wont provide the best experience for high-end gaming or video editing.

    Both Intel and AMD are starting to ship dual-core processors at the upper end of their processor lines. These powerful processors will be excellent choices for Windows Vista.

    Now is the time to decide whether youre ready to make the jump to a 64-bit processor. The current x64 processors from Intel and AMD will be excellent processors for Windows Vista, and I think well see a widespread move to 64-bit by the time Windows Vista ships. The x64-enabled processor lines include Intel Pentium 4 with EM64T, Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition with EM64T, and the AMD Athlon 64, AMD Athlon 64 FX, Mobile AMD Athlon 64, and AMD Turion 64. Because these x64 processors will run 32-bit or 64-bit Microsoft Windows equally well, and because these processors are at the upper end of the processor spectrum, they are an excellent choice in getting ready for Windows Vista, and they let you build a system that's ready to move into the 64-bit processing world whenever you're ready.

    For links to up to date information about CPU guidelines, please see http://www.microsoft.com/technet/windowsvista/evaluate/hardware/entpguid.mspx#ECAA.
    Top of pageTop of page
    Memory

    To take better advantage of Windows Vista functionality, you should have at least 512 MB of RAM, on your PC. This provides enough memory for both the operating system and a typical application workload. And while 512 MB is great for many scenarios, more advanced users will want 1 GB of memory or more. If your typical workload is heavy, you do a lot of image editing or development, or you run multiple applications all the time, then more memory is good. In general, an investment in additional memory is wise, and you should certainly make sure that the computer you buy has room to add additional memory later.
    Top of pageTop of page
    Graphics

    One important thing to keep in mind as youre thinking about the graphics capability of your new system is that while Windows Vista will have a new and graphics-intensive look, it will also be able to automatically and gracefully degrade down to the current graphics look of Microsoft Windows XP.

    The new graphics capabilities in Windows Vista will require support for Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM), if you want to take full advantage of all the new and cool stuff, such as the new AERO Glass look. While more information about specific video cards will come later, some general rules can prepare you for getting the most out of Windows Vista.

    If you are building or buying PC today, you probably want to avoid the low end of the current GPU range and make sure you get a GPU that supports DirectX 9 and has at least 64 MB of graphics memory.

    Whether you are building or buying a PC today, choose a design that includes a separate PCI Express or AGP graphics card. This way, even if the card you choose ends up not being an optimal choice, you can easily upgrade just the graphics card. And the choice of AGP or PCI Express will ensure that you have sufficient bandwidth to support the enhanced graphics of Windows Vista.

    If you choose a system today that has integrated graphics, look at the specific chipsets that are targeted to support WDDM, such as Intel's 945G express chipset or ATI's RS400 or RS480 family chipsets. You may also want to consider dual channel UMA solutions and 1 GB of system memory.

    When choosing a notebook today for use in Windows Vista, you may run into the trade-off between better graphics or thinner and lighter ultra portables. Exactly which chipsets for mobile PCs will end up fully supported is still open at this point. However, if you are purchasing a mobile PC today, and want to get AERO Glass experience, you will need a discrete card. When buying a notebook today, ask your PC vendor for more concrete information regarding graphics cards that would support WDDM.

    Whether you choose desktop or mobile configuration today, not all graphics cards will have in-box drivers in beta 1. Note that, to get the AERO Glass look with beta 1 of Windows Vista today, your system will need discrete cards. However, you should be able to get AERO Glass on systems with advanced integrated graphics choices with the later builds of Windows Vista.

    For links to up to date information about GPU guidelines, please see http://www.microsoft.com/technet/windowsvista/evaluate/hardware/entpguid.mspx#EBAA.
    Top of pageTop of page
    Storage

    Windows Vista will enable some exciting new capabilities for digital image processing, and those capabilities will push the need for large amounts of storage ever higher. If you're buying a PC, specifying one with a large hard disk is a good idea, but even more important will be the ability to add one or more additional hard disks later if you find you need the extra storage capacity.

    Because the hard disk is generally the slowest core element in your PC, you can often get useful gains in overall performance by carefully selecting technologies that improve basic hard disk performance. The typical Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) hard disk has a speed of 7200 RPM and a 2 MB cache. By selecting a Serial Advanced Technology Attachment (SATA) drive with an 8 MB cache and Native Command Queuing (NCQ), you can give your system a boost in performance, especially if your typical workload involves running several different applications simultaneously.

    A DVD drive that is capable of both reading and writing DVDs will be an important element of a Windows Vista PC. These drives have come down in price dramatically, and you should look for a drive that can handle both -RW and +RW formats (i.e., DVD±RW) to ensure maximum compatibility.
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    Networking

    Windows Vista will take full advantage of the connected world in which we operate, so you should make sure that the PC you buy has the latest networking capabilities built into it. For a laptop, this means built-in 802.11 wireless capability, and for the home PC, you should include at least 100 Mb of Ethernet capability. Adding wireless 802.11 capability to a home PC gives you greater flexibility in where you use that PC and makes it easy to connect your mobile laptop to your home network.
    Top of pageTop of page
    Summary

    As you can see from the guidelines I've covered in this column, you don't need to choose an absolute top-end computer to ensure that it will work well for Windows Vista. But you do want to make choices that are at least at the midpoint in the general price range. You also want to pay special attention to making decisions that give you maximum flexibility later to upgrade individual components as appropriate. This is a good idea for any PC decision, but its especially important for choosing a Windows Vista-capable PC.
    Top of pageTop of page
    Contact Me

    If you're using Windows Vista, or if you're just interested in knowing more about the next version of Microsoft Windows and you have a topic you'd like to see me cover, feel free to write me at Charlie@mvps.org. I'd love to hear what you think and how you expect Windows Vista to make your computing life better.

    Please understand that it is impossible for me to acknowledge or answer individual e-mail messages. Nor can I provide individual technical support via email. I do regularly participate in the beta newsgroups, and I hope to see you there.
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/windowsvista/evaluate/hardware/vistahardware.mspx

    http://blogs.msdn.com/leitenmu/archive/2006/02/25/539123.aspx
     
  9. rihgt682

    rihgt682 Regular member

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    When is this thing coming out? in the summer?
     
  10. ozzy214

    ozzy214 Regular member

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    i have it right now in dvd format. Its not supposed to be released till the end of 2006 i thought. Damn bird keeps bringing shit to me..:>
     
  11. ZippyDSM

    ZippyDSM Regular member

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    ireland
    WTH 98 was a hell of alot better than 95,ME tho is much like he 64bit windose useless....


    esrever
    it now sues virual PC to run dos and win9X apps I am not sure how much of it is in the home versions of Windows Vister(I dub thee vister untill thy proves thyself as a OS for the masses)
    As a gamer it dosent help me much at elast half of my win9X games are 3D DX and the stupid virtual PC dose not support 3D man they should learn to code from emulator makers >>
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2006
  12. garmoon

    garmoon Regular member

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    Doesn't matter each version sucks as bad as the last. There's no need to improve, it's the need to upgrade. Each upgrade is big bucks for Microsoft. All the programs are loaded with stuff all wanting to check the internet. It's a wonder DVDs can be backed up.
     
  13. ZippyDSM

    ZippyDSM Regular member

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    garmoon
    and your point being? the onyl time I pay for windose is when I buy a complete new Comp ..no bad...LOL

    ALtho you are right about improveing..its the need to sell new OS's that drives them not to make soemthign that works,I think they would be better off forceing bissnes to take vista and then focuseing on XPs compailty and secruity issues..but no we get crap... its the same old stinky crap wraped in a nice new fresh smelling package ><
    the onyl real thing vista dose new is secutiy it dosent do virus thats extra..oh wait whats secuirty without virus protection.....,if you had a PC that can run vista then your prefoemance with XP on that comp would be better....of corse once all the new games are forced onto vista you have to go vista >< 2 thigns that got me on XP 1 stableibty compared to 98 and games..mostly stabilty tho...
     
  14. garmoon

    garmoon Regular member

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    @ZippyDSM What I said you just said it better!
     
  15. ZippyDSM

    ZippyDSM Regular member

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    garmoon
    this should be interesting tho seeing that XP is stable compared to 9X (well unless you installed ever 100% win9x pice of hardware with no driver/hardware issues and such) so going from XP to vista is kinda pointless sicne it offers nothing worthwhile the only pll useing vister will be new PC users and hardcore OS nuts and mabye a few bizzness's.
    SO only by foceing new progrmas (cough halo 2 cough) to be vister only vister aint going to be selling to well 0_o
    and I hope it hits M$ hard......
     
  16. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    Microsoft: Vista won't get a backdoor


    By Joris Evers
    Staff Writer, CNET News.com
    Published: March 3, 2006, 6:00 PM PST
    Tell us what you think about this storyTalkBack E-mail this story to a friendE-mail View this story formatted for printingPrint

    Windows Vista won't have a backdoor that could be used by police forces to get into encrypted files, Microsoft has stressed.

    In February, a BBC News story suggested that the British government was in discussions with Microsoft over backdoor access to the operating system. A backdoor is a method of bypassing normal authentication to gain access to a computer without to the PC user knowing.

    But Microsoft has now quelled the suggestion that law enforcement might get such access.

    "Microsoft has not and will not put 'backdoors' into Windows," a company representative said in a statement sent via e-mail.

    The discussion centers on BitLocker Drive Encryption, a planned security feature for Vista, the update to the Windows operating system. BitLocker encrypts data to protect it if the computer is lost or stolen.

    This feature could make it harder for law enforcement agencies to get access to data on seized computers.

    "The suggestion is that we are working with governments to create a back door so that they can always access BitLocker-encrypted data," Niels Ferguson, a developer and cryptographer at Microsoft, wrote Thursday on a corporate blog. "Over my dead body," he wrote in his post titled "Back-door nonsense."

    Microsoft is talking to various governments about Vista. However, the talks are about using the new operating system and BitLocker for their own security, Ferguson wrote. "We also get questions from law enforcement organizations. They foresee that they will want to read BitLocker-encrypted data, and they want to be prepared," he wrote.

    "Back doors are simply not acceptable," Ferguson wrote. "Besides, they wouldn't find anybody on this team willing to implement and test the back door."

    Windows Vista, the successor to Windows XP, is slated to be available by year's end.
    http://news.com.com/2100-1016_3-6046016.html?part=rss&tag=6046016&subj=news
     
  17. ZippyDSM

    ZippyDSM Regular member

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    ireland
    didnt they bascily say the same about the other windose?
    Altho if this is ture and the FBI,Police and MPAA cant uummmm "hack" into you I wonder if they could over copyies of thier OS's...altho the online key checker they dont realy need to....mmmmm
    realy tho if its ture thats great,I know Vista will more secure than XP SP2 but I use XP SP1 sicne it is more compatable and dosnet have boardband limitors (couldnt they have made half open sockets a option) but no lets make it defaut so it can degrade the full speed potinal of every other Program and game.....
    I dont know why Gov and law enfocement is so afriad of bitlocker ,it will only take a year or 2 for a hacker group of soem kind to break it and spread the info across the web *L*
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2006
  18. ozzy214

    ozzy214 Regular member

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    Zippy they do make a patch for the tcip dll file. I forgot where I got it from, but since it was freeware I can up it to rapidshare. It basically patches the tcip dll to whatever max connections you want.:> Let me know.
     
  19. ZippyDSM

    ZippyDSM Regular member

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    ozzy214
    I have tried that and it didn not work for me..mabye you found a newer version or one that worked...altho being on dailup it would be hard to tell any diffrance ><

    PM links or a name of it and I can try again hell I used Ed on dailup back in the day so mabye I can tell *L*
     
  20. GrandpaBW

    GrandpaBW Active member

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    As long as everything that I have, or some software that I want in the future, runs on WinXP, I doubt that I will upgrade to a more bloated OS such as Vista. (Not to mention the DRM B.S.)
     
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