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Cold Heat Soldering Gun

Discussion in 'Xbox - General discussion' started by Hrdrk20, Jul 15, 2004.

  1. Hrdrk20

    Hrdrk20 Regular member

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    **
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2004
  2. charvey

    charvey Guest

    will some one tell me where I can buy the cold solder gun
     
  3. ayoobusa

    ayoobusa Member

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  4. jflav1

    jflav1 Member

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    I've seen this as well, and am debating whether or not I should get it. Although, in their FAQs section:

    I would like to know if it's safe to use on the console motherboards. If someone has personal experience in using it for installs/repair, and can vouch that it does not affect the motherboard components, please let me know.

    I'm 90% sure I'm going to buy it, though. It will help if I need to do any other electronic installs/repair, such as car audio.
     
  5. Daskins

    Daskins Regular member

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    i might get thing lol
    _X_X_X_X_X_[small]Hail To The Redskins![/small]
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2004
  6. darthnip

    darthnip Moderator Staff Member

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    let me know how well this thing works, if it's good i'll order 20 of them for work. the only thing i'm leary about is where it sayd it heats to 500F in 1 second. I need it to be more like 650-700F
     
  7. Cyprien

    Cyprien Active member

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    o order one aswell now ^_^....
     
  8. jflav1

    jflav1 Member

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    The main site for this is at

    http://www.coldheattools.com

    In the FAQ, it says:

    There's also a number to reach them at for bulk orders.

    As for reviews, I'd suggest looking around the Internet. There are some on amazon.com's site, search under "Cold Heat Soldering Tool". Here are some I'm concerned about:

    and

     
  9. jairus

    jairus Guest

    Unfortunately I must say we are all a bit suckered in by this one. It seems like such a brilliant idea and of course the question is does it work. Well my suggestion to you guys is stick to your tempature controlled soldering guns with the nice pointed tips for any kind of [bold]electronic work like mother boards or using it to solder your componets[/bold]. As far as using it to [bold]solder wires[/bold] and such it would be a [bold]great tool[/bold], after all look closely to the commercial that had us all pissing in our pants the first time through watching it (for us experienced solder gun users anyhow.
     
  10. facuff

    facuff Member

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    Quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This tool generates heat in a joint by running a current through it (like a toaster does). This can be lethal to solid state components such as transistors and integrated circuits. Even work on automotive wiring may be risky, as most modern vehicles are crammed with computers that are susceptible to excess current.

    In reply, My question follows:
    Was the above quote given by the manufacture of the "Cold Heat" solder iron? Even if the iron uses electrical current at the tip to produce heat, it would NOT be a hazard to sensitive circuitry unless somehow the user could complete a path for the current to pass through the circuit and then back to the internal power supply. If this iron does this by design, then I have got to have one just to tear it apart to see how they have achieved such an impossible feat. This iron, unless it builds some large static charge at it's tip, will not harm even the most delicate cmos circuitry. OHM's law doesn't make it possible for this to happen. I think I'll buy one and hope it will solder as I am tired of fooling with the $100.00 gas models that work fine for a few weeks, then die.
     
  11. facuff

    facuff Member

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    Quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This tool generates heat in a joint by running a current through it (like a toaster does). This can be lethal to solid state components such as transistors and integrated circuits. Even work on automotive wiring may be risky, as most modern vehicles are crammed with computers that are susceptible to excess current.

    In reply, My question follows:
    Was the above quote given by the manufacture of the "Cold Heat" solder iron? Even if the iron uses electrical current at the tip to produce heat, it would NOT be a hazard to sensitive circuitry unless somehow the user could complete a path for the current to pass through the circuit and then back to the internal power supply. If this iron does this by design, then I have got to have one just to tear it apart to see how they have achieved such an impossible feat. This iron, unless it builds some large static charge at it's tip, will not harm even the most delicate cmos circuitry. OHM's law doesn't make it possible for this to happen. I think I'll buy one and hope it will solder as I am tired of fooling with the $100.00 gas models that work fine for a few weeks, then die.
     
  12. dud3

    dud3 Member

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    It sounds like resistance soldering to me and should be safe for electronics they have been using it for years on model railroads with dcc systems which have digital components such as ic chips.
     
  13. Old-Wiz

    Old-Wiz Member

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    On August 17... Facuff Wrote:
    In reply, My question follows:
    Was the above quote given by the manufacture of the "Cold Heat" solder iron? Even if the iron uses electrical current at the tip to produce heat, it would NOT be a hazard to sensitive circuitry unless somehow the user could complete a path for the current to pass through the circuit and then back to the internal power supply. If this iron does this by design, then I have got to have one just to tear it apart to see how they have achieved such an impossible feat. This iron, unless it builds some large static charge at it's tip, will not harm even the most delicate cmos circuitry. OHM's law doesn't make it possible for this to happen.

    WRONG...
    This device has two pins on its tip... one from the plus side of the 6 volt power supply and one from the minus side of this 4 A-cell battery pack... It heats by passing high current through what you touch it to... Now if you touch this tip to a PCB so that one pin hits the leg of a component and the other hits the solder pad on the PCB you will place 6 volts with high available current in series with that circuit... depending on the component and the width of the trace involved you could cause plenty damage with this device... This thing should NOT be used when any electronic components are involved...
     
  14. facuff

    facuff Member

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    Even if the iron has a positive and negative contact at the tip (to produce heat), which I can believe it does, the current (electron flow) will take the shortest path(the path of least resistance), which happens to be from the negative contact of the tip of the iron, back to the positive contact of the tip of the iron. Given this fact, no electrical damage would occur from the flow of electrons that produces the heat required to melt the solder. This iron will not pass current through the circuitry unless it is intentionally made to do so. Furthermore, all TTL circuitry is designed to operate on +5Vdc and sometimes at greater voltages. A +6Vdc power source has too low of a potiental to cause damage to even the most sensitive IC. The iron may burn a hole through to China and lightning may toast cmos, but this iron will not, by design, electrically destroy even the most delicate electronic circuit.
     
  15. jairus

    jairus Guest

    Not to bash any comments made against this statement, but there is a very good possibility of harming circuits. First of heat is the main issue, there is no way to control how hot it gets. Second the current going through the two tips can most certainly destroy sensitive components, the ampherage is deff higher than the allowable amount through any component. And any accidental connection from both sides of the tip to chips or ic because the wires are very close would most certainly damage it!
     
  16. facuff

    facuff Member

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    Well yes, heat will destroy things if you are not careful. As for damaging components with electrical current produced by this iron??? I guess this discussion is best left with those who understand the physic's of the atom! I'm sorry, I thought I could help someone understand that this iron IS SAFE TO USE. I guess those of us that understand this fact will enjoy using it.
     
  17. etvaugha

    etvaugha Guest

    Amperage is the amount of power available and voltage is the potential "push" of the electrons. If you have a 6-volt device that normally has .001 amps going to it you can send 6 volts and 1000 amps to it and it won't matter. Try hooking 8 AA batteries up to a 12v light bulb, then hooking up a car battery. Both will yield the same result but the car battery exceeds the AAs by hundreds of amps. Also, Kirchoffs laws tell us that adding current to a single pole does nothing. You could put 100,000 volts on one end of an NPN transistor and not harm it because there would be no way to complete the circuit. The split tip sends current out on one end and the has polarization on the other the will take in EXACTLY the same amount of voltage as was pumped out of the positive lead. The only damage I can see happening would be heat damage and maybe somehow bridging two poles on an IC with the tip.
     
  18. jairus

    jairus Guest

    I was just wondering if anyone has recieved there coldheat soldering gun yet?
     
  19. mercurym

    mercurym Member

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    I bought one. It didn't work. Draw your own conclusion. I asked for a new one and instead they refunded my money. Does anyone have one that works?
     
  20. newbie888

    newbie888 Member

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    I have one and i am returning it cuase it is very hard to solder a modchip onto the motherboard. ANds that the only thing i sue mine so if ur not goin to be solderin modchips its a very god solder gun> probably the best
     

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