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HELP! i need a VIDEO EDITING computer! Budget of $1000 - 1200. These specs good?no? show your specs!

Discussion in 'Building a new PC' started by joesokol, Dec 8, 2009.

  1. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Joesokol: The case, while very poorly made, will suffice for your system. For the CPU cooler I would recommend one of these:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186134 - or alternatively, the high-end solutions offered by either Thermalright or Noctua (newegg don't sell Thermalright products). Xigmatek coolers are generally regarded as the low-quality imitators of the other designs. They fare reasonably well in the tests, but for the money they're far from ideal. If you're spending that on a tower cooler, may as well get the genuine article: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835608014
    Xplorer: Given the schools of thought about HDDs (there are lots of bad Samsungs, lots of bad Seagates, and many people who won't go near WD drives) there's no magic bullet sadly.
    Cheap external HDD enclosures always go wrong eventually, but 99% of the time it's the enclosure not the drive.
    Joesokol: The video card is far from kickass, you really need to get something better than a 9600GT, but it depends on the budget. Something like this for instance absolutely destroys the 9600GT for performance (and you can add another, or even 2 others at a later date if you get a 3-slot board), but appreciably costs a bit more:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161317
     
  2. Xplorer4

    Xplorer4 Active member

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    I realize that Sam, about the HDDs, but if you look at WD I would say 90% or greater, agree WD is solid. When dealing with Seagate, the numbers are still high but drop noticeably. Then from the sounds of it the press on Hitachi's current line up is split 50/50. To me that would say beware and I'll go with WD or Seagate.
     
  3. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    I must admit, Killerbug is the only person around afterdawn that really puts down WD, though I do usually find that there aren't that many people that tout WD as the main brand to buy like I do. Usually people who dislike Seagate vote Samsung and people who dislike Samsung vote Seagate.
     
  4. Xplorer4

    Xplorer4 Active member

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  5. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    I've read about this a few times, but don't seem to be able to get any detailed info about it. How many boards use the Foxconn socket? (As far as I knew almost all 775 boards had Foxconn sockets fitted). What sort of voltages does it require to cause this? How likely is it to occur below the normal causal voltage?
     
  6. Xplorer4

    Xplorer4 Active member

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    I dont believe any Gigabyte board use the foxconns, but aside from that I really dont know. I regret, buying the MSI P55-GD65 simply based on the socket. The GD64 does come with another socket option but i forget the socket. The guys on the MSI forums have a hunch the socket can be identified by the serial number.

    As far as I know the foxconn sockets are excellent for over clocking on the 775 boards. The problem seems to have only surfaced in there 1156 sockets.

    I will look into the voltage issues as best as I can, because I am actually interested to know just how much you can push the chips on these sockets. Now from what I recall this only happens on over clocked chips when using air cooling. Water cooling seems to be a different story. By all means let me know if you come up with anything on this, because Im interested in pushing my i7 just to see what the chip can do.
     
  7. joesokol

    joesokol Member

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    So I'm set on the MSI P55M-GD45 the reviews are definitely pretty good right now. I understand it has a limited ability but for the price it looks pretty solid. If i want to get an after market cooler, go for water? Lets say I get Radeon HD 5770 1GB 128-bit and later down the line I get a second one, upgrade my power supply, buy a good cooler, then over clock the sh$t out of it (to its proven limit). My cpu will burn? What precautions will definitely prevent that? B/c that would not be cool. Is there a 1000watt psu out there for under $110? I would love to find one!?
     
  8. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Xplorer: What concerns me about this is that connectors don't burn out simply because you raised the wattage that runs through them by a small amount. Remember the LGA1156 chips are only a 95W TDP. The fact that they're burning up with the sort of overclocks achievable on air suggests that the problem could conceivably occur with a 130W TDP chip eve at stock. There are no current 130W TDP LGA1156 chips and there may never be, but this highlights the fact that the socket type is defective from the get-go, not just incompatible with overclocks. It could potentially happen to anyone. It's certainly given me food for thought on which i5 board to buy. Given the delays and half-truths about Lucid, my current intention is to buy an i5 system on a traditional backbone and live with the bandwidth issues it brings for the interim. On that basis, I am looking at something like a Gigabyte P55A board for the USB3 support.

    Joesokol: Wrong attitude on the PSUs. 1KW is way overkill for pretty much ANY PC system. I use a system with two HD4870X2s, not only does that mean 4 GPUs, the 4870 GPUs also use a lot more power than 5770 GPUs. On top of that my CPU is a quad core (that uses as much power as an i5) and is overclocked and overvolted. An 850W PSU handles this system with no fuss, since it's typical maximum draw is 700W or just under.
    For two 5770s and an i5 I would suggest something like a Corsair TX 650W. Ample power for the system.


    I will be interested to contact MSI and find out about the sockets used in their boards.
     
  9. Xplorer4

    Xplorer4 Active member

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    http://techreport.com/articles.x/17789
    The GD45 has a risk of a burn out because it may utilize the foxconn socket to. So if your running that risk of burn out, why not save a few bucks and go with the P55-GD65.

    I wouldnt say the socket type as a whole is defective. As far as I know it is only the foxconn sockets with these problems. As far as I know no other socket is causing these problems its more or less problems with pin contact on these sockets.

    An I stand corrected, Gigabyte is using the foxconn sockets as well.

    So far the official response from MSI and/or Foxconn has simply been that the socket is designed to meet the specs for 1156 laid out by Intel. Over clocking, of course, is pushing the chip/socket beyond those specs.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2009
  10. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Done some research into the matter.
    Turns out Gigabyte implement Lotes sockets as of their P55A range. The normal P55s use Foxconns, the P55A boards use Lotes sockets. I am a little relieved to find that the sockets are typically burning out at speeds in excess of 5Ghz, so it's probably not a huge issue for normal users, but still not a risk I'd like to take.
     
  11. Xplorer4

    Xplorer4 Active member

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    http://www.ocforums.com/showthread.php?p=6295872#post6295872
    Turns out the Lotes socket is at risk to.

    I have heard some hearsay, people saying there has been burn outs at stock settings. From what I could see there was no evidence to support this.

    But yes, after looking into it more I to realized the OCs in question were 5+ GHz.
     
  12. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Nah, that's just a case of someone being stupid and using too high a voltage. It isn't the same sort of pattern the Foxconn sockets seem vulnerable to, it's just user ignorance. What happens at 1.6V is of no importance to me, remember the i5s are 1.2V chips. 1.6V is quite an increase.
     
  13. joesokol

    joesokol Member

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  14. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Don't buy ASRock stuff, it's cheap and nasty. The same goes for Jetway. The Biostar board is fine, if a little basic.
    The EX58-UD3R is an LGA1366 board, so don't get that. The MSI is microATX which is really designed for miniature PCs.
    The combo deal isn't bad, but my personal choice would be this:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128412
     
  15. Xplorer4

    Xplorer4 Active member

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    What exactly are you looking for in a motherboard???? You seemed set on the GD45, but I have already told you the GD65 is better for various reasons, and cheaper. Theres nothing wron with wanting the best mobo for the money but it seems like there is some sort of catch.

    Now of the ones you listed, I would stay clear of the gigabyte simply because it is an open box. ASrock, as Sam pointed out, isnt good. The MSI GD65 is good but theres no reason for a micro mobo when you have room for a normal sized mobo thats cheaper.Then there's the biostars. The last Biostar comes with a 4890 video card. Very good gpu, but might be a bit more then you need.
     
  16. joesokol

    joesokol Member

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    I want a safe,reliable mobo. I want a mobo that has expandability options. I want a solid mobo from 100 - 150 preferably in the 125 range. I want to have raid options, good 1394 onboard, safe overclocker, and have a straight forward design that can speed up my learning curve and not inhibiting it by having to much going on.

    I really don't know overall what I'm looking for I guess. I guess its like shopping for a new car. You don't know until you see it!? I am shooting for my shopping cart to be under 1100. Then I was thinking. at first (next 3 months or so) I Will be using this system for only video editing. So maybe I can drop the high dollar card right now. Pick one up later down the road when I have leisure time. But I want the ability to play whatever I get froggy for playing.

    How big of a difference would 8gb total ram make?
     
  17. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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  18. KillerBug

    KillerBug Active member

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    Other than the firewire, that is a great board. I would not even consider it for crossfire...but let us remember that this build started with a nVidia 220 video card...so a single card can easily dominate that many times over. There isn't much point paying more for expandability that you will never use. Come to think of it, you might consider getting a cheap video card without good 3D capabilities for now, then saving $150-$200 for a nice video card in the near future.

    The board should do RAID-1 (mirroring for protection) just fine; just don't expect good speeds from RAID-0, and don't even attempt RAID-5...software RAID-5 is less reliable than a single drive with no RAID.

    The 8GB of ram would not make much difference; few programs can use more than 4GB of ram (most are limited to 2GB by default, or 3GB with windows tweeking). If you are doing a lot of multi-tasking, or if you have serious 64-bit apps like Solidworks or Autodesk, that is where the 8GB would shine. Even PhotoShop CS4 x64 does not use more than 3GB unless you have a ton of huge photos open at once.
     
  19. Xplorer4

    Xplorer4 Active member

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    Well if you never tell us these things then we don't know.

    RAID is best left to a controller card imo.

    The MSI P55-GD65, is a pretty safe over clocker for the the reasons Sam and I pointed out. You have to push it to the extreme to get it there. Extreme being +5 volts. Personally I didnt even reach 4 before with OC Genies before a crash, but that was just for fun to see how good OC Genies was.
    http://valid.canardpc.com/show_oc.php?id=881408

    I dont think theres a such thing as "good" 1394. Either it has it or it doesnt. The GD65 does.

    The boards ports arent to hard to learn, but the same goes for every mobo. Every piece only fits one way no matter what mobo it is.
     
  20. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Not as safe as the Gigabyte P55A series however as they use they Lotes socket, while the MSI does not.
     

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