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Intel vs. AMD

Discussion in 'PC hardware help' started by flip218, May 21, 2006.

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  1. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    CRTs can manage resolutions any size, LCDs have to pixel map anything that isn't 'native res' so you would get issues from that. The overall picture quality will however be higher.
     
  2. Estuansis

    Estuansis Active member

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    I agree to overall better quality... just more crisp for one.

    But even at a crazy price I think there is a market for the super-thin CRT. You get the space saving of the LCD. And 30+ inches has already been done so you can at least get a decent size with nearly infinite resolution.

    Be back on later... my buddy's here to pick me up...
     
  3. theonejrs

    theonejrs Senior member

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    Estuansis,
    That's why I would love to see a DLP monitor as no resolution would be a problem. They would all look magnificent! "It's the mirrors"! LOL!! Yes they would be expensive, but gamers would lap them up!

    It's funny, but go into a TV store and you don't even have to ask which ones are DLP! Just look for the best picture quality in the store and you've found them! LOL!! I walked into Sears one day and they were easy to spot from 150' away. LCDs are good and so is Plasma but DLP is the Bomb!! With a contrast ratio of 8000:1, nothing else compares!

    Clock On,
    theone :>}
     
  4. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    And they're also cheap! You just have to go big. I almost ordered one, but unfortunately they're not legal in the UK, since they have to be imported from abroad and are too large and fragile to be carried into the country.
     
  5. theonejrs

    theonejrs Senior member

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    sammorris,
    Well that kind of sucks! LOL!! What a world we live in, huh?

    Clock On,
    theone :>}
     
  6. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Well yeah, on ebay you can find Sony ones for a little bit more money, but that's all you find. One model for the entire country and you can only buy it on ebay!
     
  7. Estuansis

    Estuansis Active member

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    >.> The DLPs are nice... I want one. lol

    But I see only 1080i/p resolution DLPs. Are they resolution bound or are they just formatted to be compatible? They're huge and thin but if 1080i/p is the best it can do for resolution I would get some massive jaggies trying to game...
     
  8. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    What on earth? 1080i/p (1920x1080) is one of the highest resolutions you can get. Projectors will always seem low res if you sit right in front of them, the point is to be able to sit further away...
     
  9. Estuansis

    Estuansis Active member

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    Yes, for video or television 1920 x 1080 is one of the highest resolutions. But I frequently am able to game at 1600 x 1200+.

    Is there a(what is the) difference between HD integrated/progressive and high resolution? I would love an explanation.

    As you can tell, monitor/screen resolution escapes me.
     
  10. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    the I is for interlaced, not integrated.
    Interlaced is the standard old fashioned TV method where half of the screen (every other line) is sent one frame, and the other half is sent the next, so the whole screen only really updates 30 times a second, rather than 60 (or 25 versus 50 for the UK)
    Progressive is like a computer screen, everything on screen gets updated every time. This is why CRT TVs displaying computer images seem 'flickery'.
    HDTV only really encompasses two resolutions other than the normal TV res (640x480/850x480 for US, 720x576/1024x576 for UK), which are 1280x720 and 1920x1080. Anything in between, such as when you hook a PC up to an HDTV is being converted to the screen's native resolution.
    LCDs, Plasmas and DLPs only have one native resolution. This is usually the top resolution for monitors (1024x768 for 15", 1280x1024 for 17/19", 1600x1200 for 20", 1440x900 for 17-19" widescreen, 1680x1050 for 20-22" widescreen, 1920x1200 for 24-28" widescreen and 2560x1600 for 30" widescreen), but for TVs, not always. A true 1080p TV will be native at 1920x1080 so you get the proper picture, and the quality of a 720p signal is slightly reduced in order to fit properly. A 720p TV that accepts 1080i/p inputs is downscaling the 1920x1080 input to 1280x720 so it can be displayed.
    With me?

    For video/television, 1920x1080 is the highest resolution.
    Monitors however sit well above that, at 2048x1536 for CRT and 2560x1600 for LCD, assuming you buy the top end models.
    The CRT advantage is that they have no native resolution, only an optimal, so they can display all resolutions without having to convert the picture, very useful. That and you can get a 19" 2048x1536 screen, LCDs can't quite get that pixel density, unless you buy a very expensive laptop!
     
  11. theonejrs

    theonejrs Senior member

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    Estuansis,
    One of the major advantages of DLP over conventional rear projection TVs is there are no hot spots, so the viewing angle is much better. It also changes the distance of the focal point to a much shorter length than any CRT projection system could achieve. The angle of projection is much wider with DLP because the projection source is so much smaller. That's why the cases, while still deeper than an LCD or Plasma can be that thin. You can't really hang them flat on a wall, but the picture quality is so much better, who cares! The three primaries are mixed and aligned before projection so convergence isn't a problem. On a CRT projection the three primeries have to be aligned very precisely, while on the DLP, the mirrors take care of that problem. All of that results in colours that remain as good as new after years of use. That's one of the drawbacks to the Plasma. Even though they have improved those, they are still no match for the longevity of the DLP or an LCD!

    Clock On,
    theone :>}
     
  12. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    You forgot to mention that a 46" 1080p Bravia LCD is £2300, a 55" 1080p Bravia DLP is £1100!
     
  13. theonejrs

    theonejrs Senior member

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    Sam,
    The Bravia 46" LCD is $2,699 at newegg while the Toshiba 57" DLP, both with 1080P is only $1,399 or almost half the cost. Both sets are very highly rated here in the US. You can also get the Toshiba 65" for $900 less than the Bravia 46" LCD. You do the math!

    I tried to make the same comparisun that you made but I couldn't find both Sony models at newegg! No matter, the DLPs are cheaper! Finding one is easier too. Just look for the best picture (by a wide margin) in the store. That's what the Salesman at sears told me! Took me maybe 15 seconds to scan up and down the display area from about 100 feet away and spot which ones were DLP! People seem to buy the LCDs because they can be mounted flat on the wall. If I want it up that high (which I don't), I'll build a simple shelf!

    Clock On,
    Russ :>}
     
  14. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Knowing how hot my LCD monitor gets, I'm not sure I'd want to mount an LCD TV on a wall anyway...
     
  15. Estuansis

    Estuansis Active member

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    @sam, Heat is a non-issue for me so far... pretty warm, yes. But not hot or anything near starting fires ;P.

    So, let me get this straight. A DLP is basically a CRT that projects at a wider angle and instead uses mirrors to flip and stretch that image? Tell me if I'm wrong here.

    But if what I said is correct that means that the DLPs have a virtually limitless resolution. But they're sized to fit a 1080 resolution? Is that why what I looked at said 1080p?

    Again, if I'm wrong here, dumb it down and point out where I'm wrong :)
     
  16. theonejrs

    theonejrs Senior member

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  17. Estuansis

    Estuansis Active member

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    That's really very interesting.

    But I don't get it. How do the tiny mirrors move? Electro-magnetic currents?

    Does the number of mirrors give it its max resolution as the number of pixels do in an LCD? Are DLPs susceptible to burn-in on the screen?

     
  18. theonejrs

    theonejrs Senior member

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    Estuansis,
    Go here!

    http://www.itsthemirrors.com/
    I don't know the answer to the first question. Whatever it is, is pretty freekin tiny!

    The second question is a yes and no answer as it's a bit complex. The overall pixels in terms of resolution are the standard 1080p, but the individual pixels of that 1080p are made up of many more pixels. Millions of them! They are not susceptible to burn in! It's picture density is many times that of an LCD screen as each color is controled in a manner that an LCD can't be. When you click on the link you will see just how small the picture it starts out with really is. The little girl is right, It's the Mirrors! Check it out! Truly amazing!

    Clock On,
    theone :>}


     
  19. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Damn it Russ, look what you've made me want? lol
    On a side note, as per usual we're not discussing Intel vs AMD!
    Does anybody know the release date of AM3?
     
  20. theonejrs

    theonejrs Senior member

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    sammorris,
    LOL!!
    How do I run my monitor in 1080p? It does both 1080i and 1080p or is that just for HD TV?
    Hey, you can plug your AMD or Intel computer into most of them! LOL!!

    Clock On,
    theone :>}
     
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