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Nvidia GeForce 1070 overheating in Chrome?!

Discussion in 'PC hardware help' started by retroborg, Jun 27, 2021.

  1. retroborg

    retroborg Regular member

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    Good day,
    I have the following setup:
    Win 7 Ultimate 64bit
    Intel Core 2 @9500 Quad 2.83GHZ
    8GB
    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Gaming X
    Driver 441.87

    Whenever I'm using Chrome Browser and then run MSI Afterburner, I noticed that that the GPU & Memory frequency and temperature are quite high as if I'm playing some game!
    GPU Clock: 1582MHZ
    Memory Clock: 4006MHZ
    Temperature: 59C


    If I close Chrome, they drop down to normal idle settings.
    GPU Clock: 139MHZ
    Memory Clock: 405MHZ
    Temperature: 46C

    This does not happen when I use Firefox or TOR and remains idle.

    So is there something wrong here and what can I do?! It doesn't seem right going so high by just running Chorme?!
    Perhaps I have caught some malware, virus that uses my GPUs resources to mine crypto currency & bit coins?!

    Any info would be highly appreciated!
    Thanks in advance
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2021
  2. ddp

    ddp Moderator Staff Member

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    when did this start to happen & have you tried a system restore to before this problem started? what anti-virus/malware program(s) are you using?
     
  3. retroborg

    retroborg Regular member

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    OK, I just disabled hardware acceleration in the Chrome Advanced settings and now the GPU, Mem & Temp remain low same as in Firefox. So is that Hardware acceleration in Chrome even needed and where does it benefit overall? It seems to stress the card a lot when it's on!

    There is also another setting "Continue running background apps when Google Chrome is closed" which I also disabled but it doesn't seem to affect the GPU either way. I don't even know what's the point of having this enabled when you're not running Chrome?!
     
  4. wither 1

    wither 1 Regular member

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    In this blog- https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforc...edded-framework-incompatibility-after-388-xx/

    a possible solution is to set Anisotropic Filtering to less than 8x in the Manage 3D settings section of the NVIDIA control panel. You would probably want to do this in Program Settings, for Chrome if you don't want to do that for all programs.

    I didn't look at the NVIDIA forum to see if there's any other possible solutions.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2021
  5. wither 1

    wither 1 Regular member

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    Did this get resolved?
     
  6. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    I think that's what he's saying in this post.


    A thought! The GPU clock and memory clock speeds he listed in his original post are within normal parameters for his card. It's not uncommon for an occasional application such as Chrome to cause heating issues. His card is made to run at higher temperatures which is why in its specs it lists clock speeds for silent, gaming, and overclocking. In his first post he also mentioned that he is using MSI afterburner, an application I also use. When temperatures run high he can manually adjust the fan to increase his its speed to keep or bring temperatures down. I do a little gaming myself and some games can really stress a card, especially if like mine it's borderline gaming capable.
     

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  7. wither 1

    wither 1 Regular member

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    Good information.

    I asked because the things he's had to do, such as disable hardware acceleration, shouldn't be necessary and other people have had the same problem with NVIDIA drivers. The information in the link I provided seems to solve that.
     
  8. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    I also have a couple of Nvidia cards currently running, and I too had similar overheating issues. I quickly resolved it by using MSI afterburner to increase the fan speed, saving the adjustment, and then setting it to load on boot. After I made the fan setting the idle temps dropped from mid 70c to 37c. The issue was caused by a faulty Nvidia driver affecting fan speed, and has since been resolved in recent a Nvidia update. A driver causing graphics card overheating won't go away until the driver itself is fixed, but it can be mitigated by improving its cooling or removing the driver and installing a previous driver version.
     
  9. wither 1

    wither 1 Regular member

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    When I bought this system 13 years ago, it had two NVIDIA cards in SLI. After a couple of years, one burned out. I went to the NVIDIA forum and found that NVIDIA had purposely disabled fan adjustment in the driver. It didn't take long for the second to burn out. I never found out why they had done that.

    Thanks for the tip though. I never used the MSI afterburner for the card I have now to make adjustments. I haven't had any problems with fan speed but the only time I really work the card is when I'm transcoding video projects.
     
  10. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    MSI afterburner is free, and it's worked with every NVIDIA card I've ever owned. I use NVIDIA cards for coprocessing video transcodes and reencodes using their CUDA feature. I started building computers more than 25 years ago before Nvidia even existed. Transcoding can cause a card to overheat. Try this. Download a copy of MSI Afterburner, install it, take a screenshot of your idle temps, and then transcode and take a screenshot of your temps.
     

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  11. wither 1

    wither 1 Regular member

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    My original cards were not MSI. The card I bought to replace them is MSI and came with the MSI Afterburner. I have never used it because I've never had to. Works like a champ. I use an older driver with it because, starting with the 600 series cards, NVIDIA did away with hardware acceleration support for older cards in it's newer drivers. Radeon did a similar thing.
     
  12. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    It's a flaw I sometimes have in my thinking in that I assume most people have relatively current hardware. I recently rebuilt an older Q9650 system using a GTX 960 and it's still supported. You don't need an MSI card to use Afterburner, just a supported NVIDIA card. I do however have some older cards sitting a box that are no longer supported such as a GTX260.:D
     
  13. wither 1

    wither 1 Regular member

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    My other system is a Dell m6500 precision workstation which has an NVIDIA graphics card (actually, I think it's a chip). It overheats quite often and, of course, I get a BSOD each time. The Dell pros told me they had to modify it to fit and the driver can't be updated. They told me to just reset back to factory settings to fix the problem. That lasts for a while and then the problem starts occurring again.I'm not going to bother with factor resets and reinstalling software. I might look into Afterburner for it.
     
  14. ddp

    ddp Moderator Staff Member

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    wither 1, is that Dell a laptop?
     
  15. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

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    Overheating seems to be a Dell issue, and laptops already tend to overheat easily. I used to oversee 100 Dell Desktops. The kind the monitor stacks on top of. When I opened the case the first thing I noticed is there's a single fan at the front that cools everything. It blows over the entire motherboard, and a heat sink that cools the CPU. They were constantly overheating because the staff kept turning the air conditioner in the room down. The bios has a manual speed adjustment which I cranked up and that helped. Another issue was it would crash and give an sound hardware issue warning, and the fix was always the same. Crack the case pop out the ram and then reinstall it, and up it would boot. I think the board bulged when it got hot and unseated the ram. Try looking in your laptop's bios to see if it has a manual cooling fan adjust.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2021
  16. wither 1

    wither 1 Regular member

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