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Rebirth of CRT as a SED

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by Prisoner, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. Prisoner

    Prisoner Guest

    Soon to be a fourth option or really third option in the High definition world is SED (Surface-conduction Electron-emitter Display). a 40-inch sized panel can be no thicker than 10 mm, weigh less than 20kg and consume around 60W. These are the "Ideal" specs on the inital protypes. Developed by Canon and Toshiba has signed on, Toshiba has decided to withdraw from CRT production by September 2004 and switch the CRT plants to SED.

    This should be really exciting to see the new systems. The reported release now is 2005, but I think they may get out for christmas this year.
    Links:
    http://www.canon.com/technology/detail/device/sed_display/
     
  2. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    Yeah, this does look like really interesting stuff. Only thing is, i wouldnt buy a Flatscreen at the minute. Nothing really compares to a high contrast xga+ projector in terms of a home cinema experience. Likelyhood is it will be many thousands of the £'s, and at that cost, an Optoma H56/H76 or Marantz projector would be better for me :) I'll keep dreaming for now :-( ....
     
  3. dRD

    dRD I hate titles Staff Member

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    The SED sounds interesting and might as well provide a good way to push down the prices of other big screen formats as well.

    I wouldn't consider spending money to plasma in Europe right now myself, as the plasmas available in Europe generally are for traditional PAL resolutions and the HDTV units are just around the corner. Happy with my 32" Sony right now :)
     
  4. Mattrage

    Mattrage Regular member

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    I am interested to see what comes of this. I worked in Consumer Electronics here in the states before plasma and lcd were even close to accessible for most, but everyone always wanted one. I myself never really saw a better contrast on any of the currently available technologies than can be had on a good ol' CRT, like an XBR series Sony. I hope this technology (or something similar) is actually able to achieve what they claim. Large size, true hdtv resolution, flat, and best of all, picture on par with crt, and I may have to finally invest in a large tv.
     
  5. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    To be honest, it will be ahrd to get a contrast ration like that on a CRT. The contrast on those can go to phenomenal levels.
     
  6. Prisoner

    Prisoner Guest

    I am really interested to see how it performs. The bigest problem I have with LCD, is the lack of Black. Due to the back lighting you can`t get black. A similar problem seem to occur with Cheap DLP as you get rainbowing. Only with a CRT can you get true black, thus why the contrast can be amazing. Also with my images (my research) black is required. I also like it with dark movies. The grays on my LCD, look good, but for research is a little annoying.
     
  7. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    The reason with cheaper DLP and black levels is that the mirrors only rotate at 10 degrees. With the new DDR Dark chips, there is a black coating underneath the mirrors and extended rotation to 12 degrees. This allows for a deeper level of black. The better projectors like the marantz have a 7 segment colour wheel. This is 2x RGB colours and one Dark Green colour. The dark green colour allows for even better contrast ration, while the 2x RGB eliminates any Rainbow effect. These sort of projectors can get anywhere up to around 5000:1 contrast ration, which is really more than anyone would ever need. Your local cinema will most likely only be around the 1000:1 contrast. My Panasonic arrives tomorrow moening, so ill get to test it properly soon. I have seen ones working though, and the contrast looks great. My biggest problem with LCD is the low fill factor of the pixels which ends up producing a Screen Door Effect (names after looking through insect screen doors. With DLP there is virtually no screen door effect and with CRT, pixels, and thus problems associated with pixels, dont come into play. My honest belief is that SED will stay as a Flatscreen technology, but the future for home cinema fanatics will be 3 chip DLP Projection and no colour wheels. Sorry for the one paragraph, but my enter key always seems to just stop working sometimes??
     
  8. Prisoner

    Prisoner Guest

    You have to stop eating while you type, that will save your keys. :)

    But seriously, it depends on your purpose for contrast. In my Microscopy imaging anaysis, and colour detection systems the contrast is critical. However for watching movies, yes 500:1 is really all you need. One of the researches spend 2 million on a highest contrast, large LCD screen. This is amazing, I should see what a movie looks like. But I do think your right about DLP, Unless the SED are really cheap. Then I think that will take over, the major advantage DLP has is the bulbs can be easily replaced and they just go, you don`t get a fading effect that is noticable with LCD or Plasma.
     
  9. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    Yeah with DLP it can be scary when a bulb goes. It gives a load pop and thats it, however there is usually a warning about 20 hours before this happens. The lamp life of the Panasonic is 5000+ hours which is really brilliant. My old sony only had 2000 hours which is about normal. Yeah, im looking forward to seeing what SED does to the market in terms of prices. Any new technology, even if not used by most of us, inevetably helps us anyway through pricing.
     
  10. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    Got the Panasonic today and the picture looks amazing in terms of quality. However, both the settings for Cinema1, Cinema 2 dont quite have the right colour saturation in them. It just seems far to green. Im going to spend sometime and try to get it set up correctly....
     
  11. Prisoner

    Prisoner Guest

    Good to hear. Let me know how the setup goes. I have found that most of the present settings like that suck. Just like current receivers, the Music setting is alwasy better than the cinema setting. I find that odd.
     
  12. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    Yeah, im working on it. All the reviews i have read say that the Cinema1 and 2 settings are amazingly realistic, and they seem fine for some films, but lord of the rings looks poor. I'll keep working on it...
     

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