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The Generic, Basic, (Mini) Linux Starter's Thread

Discussion in 'Linux - General discussion' started by The_Fiend, Nov 17, 2006.

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  1. blivetNC

    blivetNC Regular member

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    Yes, you can download, yes you can play a game, only one operating system can run at once, just have a choice on which one to use.
     
  2. dragondog

    dragondog Regular member

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    ok i see, right now i am downloading a lg3d pclinux and alinux and going to try it out on live disk.
     
  3. janrocks

    janrocks Guest

  4. dragondog

    dragondog Regular member

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    what about the 3d desktop how do i get it i google and i dont understand this stuff like i said b4 im a fetus when it comes to linux
     
  5. dragondog

    dragondog Regular member

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    when i google i know its called lg3d looking glass 3-d but every time i try to get it to work the linux os does not find it is there i linux that comes pre installed?
     
  6. dragondog

    dragondog Regular member

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    i can not get alinux to work maybe bad dl but anyway pclinuxos is allright just hate that everything is so big i do not know how to shrink it the icons are huge just too big for my eyes if there is a way to get smaller i would really like that os but so far new ubuntu is doing good foe me out of the ones im checking out....but again i love the look that pclinuxos has looks more orginized like ms windows
     
  7. janrocks

    janrocks Guest

    PCLinux icons. Right click somewhere on the desktop and select "desktop preferences" from the drop down menu. There should be a setting for large-medium-small icons in there. Or increase the screen resolution.
     
  8. dragondog

    dragondog Regular member

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    the res is set to highest witch is 800 600...but i boot from live disk i do not know if have any thing to do with it and i looked 4 large and small but did not find.....ill keep trying
     
  9. janrocks

    janrocks Guest

  10. bunny_c

    bunny_c Guest


    Nice guide,definitely one for the bookmarks.

    To my memory you were planning on writing a guide,explaining how to make a dual boot system for Linux\Windows.

    Do you have any idea for when it's coming out?
    As i am impatiently waiting to do so.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 20, 2007
  11. janrocks

    janrocks Guest

    You got me there too ;).. I will never ever use windows again, so it can't have been me.

    The secret of dual boot is make 2..repeat 2 partitions, then install windows on the first. That makes installing linux on the second easy, and all modern linux installers will deal with it for you.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 20, 2007
  12. The_Fiend

    The_Fiend Guest

    It will probably get done... On A Cold Day In Hell.
    Unless more members that i deem respectfull ask for it, there will be no more linux guides/help from me, other than minimal advice on what distro's one should not use, and simple security pointers.
     
  13. janrocks

    janrocks Guest

    This is a tutorial on how to create a dual boot with a flavor of Linux and Windows XP(using the NTFS file system) using the GRUB boot loader.

    While some of the things discussed in this tutorial may seem obvious to the more advanced members of the AD linux community, Please remember that this tutorial is made so that even if someone has no prior experience with Linux or doing a clean install, they can still set up a dual boot with XP using the GRUB boot loader. If you think that you do not need this tutorial or do not wish to learn more on the topic, please do not continue reading. ;-) before anybody jumps in being critical of some of my methods.. this was how I did it back when I was a linux n00b too, and I wrote this not long afterwards.. some things may be dated, I was running NT back when. Please feel free to comment/add suggestions.

    I wrote this tutorial because when I first attempted this I thought I knew what I was doing, and quickly found out I had no idea what I was getting myself into. I even started a thread that asked for advice on this topic. Unfortunately, there are just so many little things that people assume others know. When I finally got enough info to make a dual boot, I decided to write this tutorial to give people like myself a helping hand, by writing a how-to on dual-booting. Also, I noticed that a large amount of people that attempted this using the NTFS file system for their XP partitions experience problems that force them to convert their XP partitions to the less secure FAT32 file system. Using the GRUB boot loader solves this problem.

    This tutorial is aimed at the following people:

    * People looking to EASILY set up a Linux / XP system.
    * People that are interested in the new GRUB boot loader and how to implement it.
    * People that are just looking for something to do with their free time.=)


    Preparation before the Installation:
    There are a few things that we need to have before we can start. Obviously, we need a copy of both Windows XP and Linux.
    The easiest way to obtain a copy of Linux is to download the bootable ISO’s from a site and burn them to a CD-R. http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major I recommend the use of the mirror sites over the actual companies’ site, because the companies’ FTP server tends to be really slow.

    In order to burn the ISO’s into a CD, you must have a third-party CD burning program. The native burner which is built into Windows XP DOES NOT have the ability to do this. It will only copy the ISO onto the cd which does you no good (see any of the iso burning threads on afterdawn if you don't know what to do with a XXXXXXXX.iso file)

    The final preparation step is to back up all your files(Don't forget your e-mails!! - I lost over a thousand e-mails and all my bookmarks because I forgot to back them up!).

    Partitioning, Formatting, and Installing XP:
    Once, you’ve backed up all of your files that you wish to save(don’t forget your e-mails!), you’re ready to begin. It is good practice to install Windows XP first since it does not have the level of customization that Linux does(XP has the nasty habit of taking the first partition it finds).

    Pop in the XP installation CD and restart. When your Computer’s start up screen comes up, enter the BIOS setup by pressing the necessary key(s). Set it up to have your computer boot from your CD drive. When the CD boots up, you’ll be greeted with the standard Windows XP set-up screen.

    The next step is to use the fdisk partitioning utility and carve your hard drive into partitions. Fdisk comes with XP. After you ok the installation for the first time it will let you delete your current hard disk and partition it. How you partition your hard disk is up to you and what your system can handle. I did the following on a 40 GB hard drive:

    15GB for XP and applications (NTFS)
    1GB for XP Swap/Paging File (NTFS – not necessary for XP)
    16.5GB for Data and Files (FAT32)
    7.5 GB for Linux (Will be formatted during the Linux install)

    I decided to make the Data and Files partition FAT32, because that way both Linux and XP can read and write to it (Linux can read from NTFS, but writing to it is still “experimental” and not suggested). After you partition the hard drive you format the partition XP on using NTFS (make sure that your XP partition is the FIRST partition).

    Continue with the XP setup and finish installing. Once you’re done, you can format the other partitions (not necessary for the Linux partition though) by going to Start -> Control Panel -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. There are tools in there that you can use to format your partitions and make them recognizable and usable in Windows.

    Partitioning, Formatting, and Installing Linux:
    The Linux install is only slighty more complicated, but is faster ( ~20min). Pop-in the 1st Linux CD and restart again. Your system should still be set to boot from CD, so the Linux installation screen should come up. You want to do just an install. In most linux distros (I was using redehat/fedora at the time) this brings up the installation GUI for Linux. When it asks you what kind of installation you would like to perform you want to select “custom” or “expert” (custom is the easier of the two, only use expert if you are sure that you know what you are doing!), since you’ll need to tell Linux what partition to install on.

    Setup will eventually ask you what program you want to use to partition your hard drive. I chose to use Disk Druid.(others are available..these days I like cfdisk, most new distros have a partitioner all their own) It’s a pretty easy utility to use and it has a GUI (unlike fdisk which is command line). Linux will recognize your Windows partitions and show them. If Windows decided to format your Linux partition to FAT16 (mine did for some weird reason…) just delete it. Out of the free space left on your hard drive you need to make the following partitions:

    50MB for Boot Partition, listed under “\boot”
    2x your current amount of RAM for Linux Swap/Paging File(ex: 256MB RAM -> 512MB Paging File, and its REQUIRED for Linux), listed under “\swap”
    3GB or more for the Linux OS Partition, listed under “\” which is called “root”

    Once this is done, you can continue through the rest of the setup, just make sure that when you reach the point of what Boot loader you want to use, pick GRUB and make sure it installs to the MBR(Master Boot Record). This will cause Linux to boot instead of XP the next time your computer boots from the hard disk.

    Once your done picking and choosing what you want installed along with the Linux OS, setup will do the rest for you. Make sure you make a user account for yourself other than “root” when prompted by the Linux setup, because when you are logged into the “root” account you can do anything and everything to the partition Linux resides on, including DELETING THE WHOLE PARTITION by accident.

    Post Linux Installation:
    Ok, so now we have both OSs installed. Once Linux is finished setting up you can remove the CD, and restart. This time go back into the BIOS setup and set the computer to boot from the hard drive again. GRUB will appear and give you a choice between either Linux and DOS or just Linux to boot to. Select Linux with your keyboard. Linux will boot and bring you to a login screen. Login under the “root” account, using the login name “root” and your “root” password. - This is the only way to modify the necessary file to get Windows XP to boot from GRUB.


    (historic info follows.. Most modern linux distros will have asked you a while ago about the grub bootloader and cohabiting with another OS.. Use your common sense and chose the option you want)
    Once Linux is finished loading, bring up the Command Line Shell (In Redhat 7.2 this is the computer monitor Icon with a shell on it located in the taskbar, if you can’t find it in **insert name of linux distro here** just hover over each icon with your mouse and the name of the program will appear as “Terminal”, “Root Terminal”, "Console", "Command Line", or something to that effect.). Once the Command Shell appears, you need to navigate to the following directory and file:

    /etc/grub.conf

    If you’ve never used the command line interface in Linux before(like me), go to the “Sessions” button and click on the “Root Midnight Commander” (the non-“Root” version won’t allow you to edit the file). This will bring up a very basic GUI(similar to the BIOS setup in use) that will allow you to easily navigate your Linux files.

    Once you open up the file, either through the command line or through Midnight Commander, go all the way down to the bottom of the file and add the following lines after the rest of the lines in the file:

    title Windows XP
    [TAB]root (hd0,0)
    [TAB]makeactive
    [TAB]chainloader +1

    PLEASE NOTE that the word TAB inside the brackets indicates where you should indent with a TAB. Make sure that you type the bolded lines in EXACTLY as written above with the spaces and capitalizations all correct. Save it and exit. The next time you restart and the GRUB boot loader comes up, Windows XP should be listed under Linux. Just select it with the keyboard and hit enter. Windows XP should boot up and your system is now dual-booting Windows XP and Linux!! If the Windows XP title does not appear on your GRUB boot loader screen then you know that you did it wrong (real simple test, right? ;-) ).

    There you go.. And you wanted to know how to do it right??
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 20, 2007
  14. bunny_c

    bunny_c Guest

    thankyou so very much,i can't wait to get started doing this when i get home.
     
  15. dragondog

    dragondog Regular member

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    i have linux and xp on my hard drive....i can only select one to operate at a time..... is that dual booting?...or is dual booting something else?
     
  16. dragondog

    dragondog Regular member

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    and what is the point of dual booting?
     
  17. bunny_c

    bunny_c Guest

    Yes,you have a dual boot system.
    A dual boot system is a computer with two operating systems. At startup, a boot manager program lets the user choose which one to load. "Multiboot" may refer to a dual boot system or to one that hosts more than two operating systems. For example, System Commander lets you install all the operating systems you wish on one PC and choose which one you want at startup.
    http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia_term/0,2542,t=dual+boot&i=42074,00.asp

    If you have a dual-boot system you have the advantage of being able to use the positive factors of one OS when needed and they other when needed.
     
  18. ddp

    ddp Moderator Staff Member

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  19. janrocks

    janrocks Guest

    Nothing for trolling and double posting??? LMAO!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 27, 2007
  20. corn

    corn Guest

    I don't know... It seems about a trillion and one times better than XP. Soon I think I will switch. If I mess up my computer, Pa will have my hide : ), lets just put it at...
     
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