1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

The Official PC building thread -3rd Edition

Discussion in 'Building a new PC' started by ddp, Jul 16, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. ChrisC586

    ChrisC586 Regular member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2005
    Messages:
    964
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    What i found on my AMD boards with XP3 is if I nstalled the pre release final edition and then the final edition with the updates everything works well. On the last 2 builds I tried XP3 on the updates as recommended and had lots of problems. What I found was to install the pre finish version then installed updates and then installed the final version.The XP pro 64 bit with its own
    updates is a cluster____!Any advise on this XP 64 would be greatly appreciated. Chris
     
  2. Mort81

    Mort81 Senior member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    5,921
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    116
    ZoSo,

    I really don't want to give you any OC suggestions/advice until I've had a chance to get my feet wet with my Q9450. This is my 1st quad core. theoretically it should OC the same as a C2D but there are some differences. I want to get some experience under my belt before offering advice or help OC'ing it. I don't yet know what limitations there might be with the 8x multiplier and FSB. give me a few days. besides you're already smokin fast at stock speed :-D my RB/CCE times of my Q9450 (stock 2.66ghz) are mirroring the times of my E3110 (E8400) @ 4.0ghz. it's even faster with hc encoder by hanks, best quality setting by almost 10 minutes. suprised even me.

    haskins69,

    with that many mobo failures, even different models, I would seriously look into the possibility of an outside problem other than the mobo. I know the reputation of asus mobo's with nvidia chipsets is not outstanding but there are also quite a few cases of them being very good performers/OC'ers as well.

    if I was in your situation, I would try to get into a mobo with an intel chipset (P35/45, X38/48) even if I had to front a little money. if that is not an alternatve under any circumstances, I would go with EVGA. I wouldn't let the asus supreme sound card influence me in any way. onboard audio has come a long way and is much better than it used to be and besides you can get into a creative SB audigy for a little over $30. now the X-Fi fatal1ty's do cost considerably more but can't be compared with the supreme audio. different ballpark.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2008
  3. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    5,977
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    128
    bigwill68

    Other than the points I mentioned above they appear to be the same. They both use the same chipset and both have 8 Phase power supplies. I have the P5Q Deluxe and it's been great board thus far. It even surpassed by expectations which is rare.
     
  4. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    33,355
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    118
    Mort: So far so good on my 2006 580W, but it doesn't get used that often. The fan bearing in the 2005 480W unit though is absolutely ruined, and that hadn't seen use for over a year.
    Krj: Awesome link. The results don't surprise me in the slightest really, for a cheap 450W PSU, 335W is miles too much load, you generally need to divide by about six to find the safe load for a budget brand PSU.
    Haskins: The problem is primarily with nvidia chipsets, not Asus (though you can't entirerly absolve them from blame) - getting an EVGA nvidia chipset board is not guaranteed to give you any better luck. Stick with an Intel chipset board like the Asus Rampage, Gigabyte X48-DS4 or one of DFI's X48 offerings.
    Also, what PSU is your system running on? Has that ever been changed?
     
  5. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    5,977
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    128
    Most power supply fans can be replaced with an inexpensive case fan of the same size and properties. To keep prices down parts manufacturers universalized many parts to be used for similar purpose in several areas.

    Solid advice Mort, too bad others don't see it that way.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2008
  6. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    33,355
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    118
    Indeed, I know they can be replaced relatively easily, but I don't really use that PC any longer, and the fan does still work, so I'll probably pass on that repair.
     
  7. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    5,977
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    128
    No, it will probably take up to $10 and technical skills that are equivalent to changing a light bulb to complete this daunting task.:p
     
  8. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    33,355
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    118
    Anyway, moving back on topic, reading up on Nehalem has left me a bit confused with the different sockets. We've had celerons, P4s, Pentium Dual cores, Core 2 Duos, Core 2 Quads and both extreme and Xeon versions of some of these on LGA775 for all this time. Why now have we got LGA1160 and LGA1366? What's the significance of the two different structures?
     
  9. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    5,977
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    128
    Nehalem's structure requires a greater Pin count (pinout) than does the the LGA775. Nehalem has a larger pin count. Most processors sockets were the actual number of Pinouts such as socket 478=478 Pinout, 939=939pinout. LGA775 is a little long in the tooth since it was originally engineered for the P4, and Nahelem probably can't function with so few pinouts.
     
  10. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    33,355
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    118
    I understand why Nehalem requires a greater pin count, what I'm asking is why there are two different sockets for it in the mainstream market, and what the differences are.
     
  11. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    5,977
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    128
    If you understand why it requires a greater pin count then you should understand why there will be two different sockets, different pincounts. Intel hasn't said much about Nehalem, but we do know that some if not all of the Nehalem's will have Hypertransport and hyperthreading (QPI)on top of being multi-cored. There is going to be an 8 core Nehalem, and Nehalem will be introducing 3 channel memory instead of two on all or perhaps just s. Although this isn't entirely clear it also explains why a new chipset is also needed. I can't say whether or not the numbers reflect the actual pinouts since socket "7" and socket "A" didn't, but there is a strong likely hood of that being true. Also it is not unusual for a processor manufacturer to introduce a socket difference for pro boards and consumer boards.


    edited because I forgot a word "Hyperthreading" a comon error in my posts. LOL
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2008
  12. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    33,355
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    118
    Perhaps I don't then. If the P4 with hyper-threading can share the same socket as a Core 2 Quad without it, then as far as I can see it, the number of cores at least, along with whether or not HT is included doesn't seem to make much difference to the socket required.

    We already have the server grade socket and mobile socket listed as separate figures, leaving two in the mainstream. A little more research suggests that very little is known about 1366, so it may not even come to being. We shall see, I suppose.
     
  13. Sophocles

    Sophocles Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    5,977
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    128
    It would seem that socket 775 has limitations that are apparently inadequate for the new Nehalem design. Socket 775 uses on motherboard memory controllers and requires a front side bus. Intel with Nehalem has taken a lesson from AMD and decided to do away with the on motherboard memory controller and the FSB. No add three channel memory which is also a departure from socket 775 and the implications of increased pin count begins to make sense. A lot of what I'm saying is to a degree pieced out of bits of articles that I've stored on hounds along with a little educated speculation.


    Core 2 duo and quads weren't really an evolution in processor design in that they were built out of older architectures such as the PIII and earlier designs for laptops (earlier Pentium M)but can't remember the core name at the moment. There were quick fixes to stop the corporate bleeding cause by AMD. Nehalem is a true processor evolution and socket 775 would have probably meant a limitation to the design.

    I believe the forgotten core was the Yonah.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2008
  14. rick5446

    rick5446 Guest

  15. bigwill68

    bigwill68 Guest

    @sophocles
    thanks well the P5QC will be my choice,cause i like the option of using ddr3 down the line , plus cost of ddr 3 is goin down..

    That is very much true..so people don't even know that they see it as it comes how it is likea used car..me i like to modify changes things around see how they work better yet takes them apart..I have a Cooler Master eXtreme RP-500-PCAR 500W PSU powering my system now..that Santa Gave me..lol..let me tell you the box lied (super silent) no way that fan sounded like a lawn mower running without cutting grass..I brought that to my co-worker CincyRob attention and show him that you can change the fan out..and we did with new cooler master 120mm Blue Led..fan cost only $5.00... only modify ..i had to do was splice the red & yellow wire together to get the led's to work..cause the mobo on the psu has 2 pin connection where fan has 3 pin..it's went from bein real loud with the factory down to bein nice and silent you can't hear it but you see the light..lol..:)

    now question is there a difference in what type plastics used to make fans..i believe the bearings matter also and blade count cause they all cut the air different because of the sounds they make of bein loud or silent aka dba/cfm..I believe you change any PSU Fan out if the fan is to noise for you..

    Now on the Intel Nehalem issue..they say some chips will be banned from over clocking..this what..i read..i don't know if it's true or not but there's goin to be 3 chips made and two of them you can't Oc..here it is We get to know that Intel will change overclock policy when LGA1366 and LGA1160 to replace LGA775 and then Intel just allow high-end quad core Bloomfield to overclock.


    Nehalem products include high-end Bloomfield (core quad, LGA1366), mid-end Lynnfield (core quad, LGA1160) and low-end Havendale (core 2 duo, LGA1160).


    It is said that Intel wont limit Bloomfield to overclock but Lynnfieed and Havendale will be banned.


    Nehalem family will be integrated most functions of current Northbridge chipset and Intel maybe to change something such as BIOS visit, FSB control, etc.


    We dont know why Intel did this and we also wonder if Intel will change their mind. It is possible that overclock will be only belonging to high-end gamers while the mid-end and low-end users just can ran at the default clocks.

    so Oc'ing will be limited?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
  16. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    33,355
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    118
    Rick: That's quite neat actually, I like it. I'm not too sure how I'd feel about plug-on contacts for hard drives after a few months of use, especially if you regularly swap out drives.
     
  17. rick5446

    rick5446 Guest

    I agree with that
     
  18. creaky

    creaky Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Messages:
    31,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Yeah, sounds like a novel idea, but for my usage i can't beat the most important drives being internal to the PC therefore always accessible, plus any external drives i have are suited to caddies as they're just backup drives (will be adding another 4x 500GB in caddies pretty soon (1TB drives are still too pricey for my liking).
     
  19. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    33,355
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    118
  20. cincyrob

    cincyrob Active member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    5,065
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    96
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page