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The Official PC building thread - 4th Edition

Discussion in 'Building a new PC' started by ddp, Sep 13, 2010.

  1. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Oh yeah definitely, the 8-series was a fairly substantial leap over the 7 and not one I've really seen replicated at Intel's end yet. To be quite honest, the Ryzen 7 I upgraded to runs rings around my 8400, but given the price of Intel CPUs seemed to jump when the almost identical 9400 was released, it was quite a while before you could get a deal as good as I had from my 8400 three years ago (where does the time go?)
    I don't have any real benches to compare the CPUs with other than handbrake video encodes, which I've run on many of my machines, mostly for processing dashcam footage and the likes. The 7600 in my main PC would process at about 0.9x realtime, the 8400 in the LAN PC about 1.5x realtime, and the 3700X about 3x. Games-wise there was noticeable difference between the 7600 and 3700X as well, but as I've not run the 8400 in tandem with a capable GPU it's not easy to say how that would compare. Probably quite well.
     
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  2. Estuansis

    Estuansis Active member

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    Were I to acquire an 8700K or 9900K I could ideally overclock that to 4.8-5GHz all cores. There aren't really any Ryzen chips that can manage that on air. A huge number of 8700Ks and 9900Ks can. And do it well. Considering the similar IPC of the architectures, I daresay that matches or beats any 6c12t or 8c16t Ryzen respectively. The 8700K would at least be significantly better than a 3600X. And considering current prices stateside it's actually an okay value as well. The 9900K currently isn't a whole lot more expensive new than a 3800X. And good boards are equivalent. The i7 8700K can already be had for a reasonable ~$250 on ebay as we speak.

    The i5s are indeed pretty humble though. This 6c6t doesn't hold a candle to any modern 8c16t chip in raw power. Luckily clockspeed is still king for my needs. I intend to overclock this 8600K as high as I can manage. That should close a lot of the performance gaps, at least with some CPUs, lol. 6 threads isn't a lot. However that makes this a cheap entry to a better platform for me. I had a chance at a 9600K for slightly more but everything I've found says the 8600K is a better chip for overclocking, haha. Architecturally they are identical. Only difference is a soldered IHS and clockspeed on 9th gen. And the solder job isn't amazing either. The TIM on the 8600K is still fine. It hasn't been a big issue since Ivy Bridge and Haswell. I looked at a 7700K based setup, but 4c4t or 4c8t seems so limited to me and the platform is entirely defunct and expensive like Haswell. I want at least 12 threads in the future. Coffee Lake does this cheaply.

    The good deal on the board and CPU were what compelled this move. ~$120 for the board and ~$170 for the CPU. Much less than what I paid for my current setup, with equivalent board capability to handle the CPUs it was designed for, with similar build quality. The RAM was cheaper than my current 16GB(2x8GB) DDR3-2400 kit at $140 as well. Not counting the used price of the additional 8GB(2x4GB) kit. So I get more and faster RAM for cheaper as well. With less slots used and the option for more. With less overall power usage and heat output in my poor house assaulting my poor AC unit and budget. With PCIe 3.0 4x for my NVMe drive.

    A lot of stuff had to fall into place to compel me to do this. It had to be a solid true upgrade and it had to be cheap enough. Ryzen never really offered that to me. I do not like the lack of clockspeed and crappy overclocking. I never moved on a cheap 2600X to step into the architecture, and now Coffee Lake 8th gen is just as cheap. With the current Ryzen CPU prices, I might as well go used Intel.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2021

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