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Transfer DVR videos to computer

Discussion in 'Digital TV - United States & Canada' started by ima49311, May 23, 2006.

  1. ima49311

    ima49311 Regular member

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    I currently subscribe to Time Warner and have a digital package with them that includes their DVR system.. Is there a way to hook that unit up to a computer or external hard drive and transfer the recorded shows allowing me to burn them to a dvd?? I know you can do that with TIVO systems but this is with Time Warner.. thanks in advance!
     
  2. Mounties

    Mounties Member

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    Ima, I have the same equipment and the same question. I notice that nobody has responded and was wondering if you have figured it out?
     
  3. WizRD

    WizRD Member

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    i have same problem. I have a DVR 625 box from Dishnetwork and I called them an be able to do it enless I had some one that knows alot about computers. So i come where the exprets are and I find that they are asking the same qustion. So I will find out some way some how and relay on a step by step. Thanks
     
  4. WizRD

    WizRD Member

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    Let me try to help y'all...
    Forget the type, brand, and service provider for a second...

    You have 3 options to transfer things from the DVR, and each provides more/less capabilities:

    1) Some people are using a TV tuner card to capture the images (imagine your computer as a digital vcr). Using this method, you would be able to get Audio/Video from any source (DVD, DVR box, XBOX, PS2, Cable, etc.), but not HD, since the TV tuner card doesn't have HD input (not commercialized yet I think).

    Pros: It works really easily and universally. You will have a guide that tells you what to do once you buy the tuner.
    Cons: You need to buy a TV tuner card if you don't have on, and it needs to support at least MPEG2 (DVD) to have high quality (check woot.com often, they sell 'em for ~ $20). *Note: MPEG4 is better, and after ripping to Vxid, DivX, and such you save space tons of space for a lil' loss of quality). Also, unless you are recording in real time, transferring files means RE-recording them. (Sequential Recording: 120min of video means 120min waiting time.) And no matter what, you will never get HD video this way, unless the TV tuner has HD input.

    2) Others, like me, are trying to hack (hack = getting into the box; not illegal!) into the dvr cable box using either Usb2.0, Firewire, Smartcard, etc ... It's anyway of getting into the memory (the 120gb/160gb thingy in your DVR)... try google, and search for "your_brand_here firewire hack" or "your_box_here usb access" or so.

    And here, you have 2 sub-options?:

    a) Record live programs or old recording from the DVR using the firewire, just like you did with the TV tuner. (Same setup, but only a firewire cable needed). You will only have Read Access (you can only see the files, but you can't erase nor put new files into the DVR). This is all most of you want btw...

    or

    b) But since you already need a computer for this, why not go ahead and have Read/write Access right? (going a step further now though...) This allows you to transfer downloaded videos from your PC to your DVR, and erase old recordings/files, which is very useful since you save storage (linux/programming experience required, but it's really not that hard). I'm not explaining this because any person capable of running linux/programming should know how to do this without help.

    Pros: It's free if you have the cables. Data transfer is faster, since it's non-sequential. If saved as HD video, you could see them in your laptop as HD, and if you get to access the Hard Disk from your computer, you will have a Virtual Media Center which will allow playback from downloaded files. You can also manage your recorded content which allows for more recording time.

    Cons: You will need help (and probably no one will help you) so you really need to know your sh*t. Firewire cable required, Linux and programming knowledge may be needed. Also, you will need a higher Firmware than 7.10. Contact your Service provider for an upgrade. (This info is somewhere in a sticker around your DVR cable box)

    3) A friend of mine here in college (PhD student ECE fellow) hooked up his cable box to the house network using a Ethernet port (his box came with one), and was able to hack into the box using the router-Ethernet access. He uses the box as Storage, Media Player, and TV broadcast system (he watches live TV anywhere he is since his connection is so fast). I don't know how to do this, but I do know it's possible, so anyone is welcome to post how. This transfers at roughly 1gbit connection running on a T3... so that’s like a fiber optic connection. And with simple DSL he gets HD anywhere. Erm... sweet huh?

    Just for a legal reference, the only illegal action you can commit from doing all this is illegally sharing recorded programs. The next link is mentioned only as a reference on how to transfer recordings from your DVR to your computer (using DCT6412/DCT3412 and Windows XP) and then how to save recorded programs. Even if you don't have this specific box, look at it, and understand it, and see the required steps... All boxes will need something similar.

    http://replayguide.sourceforge.net/dct6412/ <--- Comcast in Atlanta, GA

    So, that's how you do it. Specifics are up to you, and some people here might help. So now try posting only your cable box model and maybe someone can help you hack into it, if that's what you want. Or ask for a good TV tuner Card. And no more "how to do this" questions; everything should be clear now
     

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